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Author Topic: Plexiglass/ Plastic Window Inserts  (Read 5185 times)
WA5CVI
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« on: December 14, 2010, 06:04:03 AM »

I recently read an ad for Plexiglass or perhaps Lexan window inserts with SO239's and feedthrough insulators already installed. They can be put into windows to allow feedthrough lines or coax to be brought into the house. Would anyone know of such a product? Thanks
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KG4RUL
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« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2010, 06:15:51 AM »

I went with an MFJ panel made of wood http://www.mfjenterprises.com/Product.php?productid=MFJ-4602  This panel has three UHF feedthroughs along with provisions for balanced line and random wire antennas.

This panel takes a different approach and provides five weather sealed, adjustable openings for bringing cable with connectors attached into the shack> http://www.mfjenterprises.com/Product.php?productid=MFJ-4604
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AA4PB
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« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2010, 06:16:30 AM »

One possibility: http://www.mfjenterprises.com/Product.php?productid=MFJ-4602

Try a google search on "window feed thru"
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AA4PB
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« Reply #3 on: December 14, 2010, 06:22:24 AM »

Here's another: http://www.qsradio.com/Mounts.htm
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WA4VBC
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« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2010, 07:28:24 AM »

You could go to a home improvement/building supply store, get them to cut a piece of plexiglass to the exact size of your window pane, install a few bulkhead UHF connectors (like the UG-263) and you are all set and saved a few dollars.  Sid.  WA4VBC
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AA4PB
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« Reply #5 on: December 14, 2010, 07:37:05 AM »

You could go to a home improvement/building supply store, get them to cut a piece of plexiglass to the exact size of your window pane, install a few bulkhead UHF connectors (like the UG-263) and you are all set and saved a few dollars.  Sid.  WA4VBC

You'd probably want to use Lexan for that rather than Plexiglass. Plexiglass will "yellow" over time in the sunlight.

By the way, one of the issues with using one of the bottom inserts is that the top of the window doesn't seal because it is always open by the height of the insert. You'll have to find some way to seal the top edge of the bottom window.
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G3RZP
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« Reply #6 on: December 14, 2010, 07:55:31 AM »

If you don't mind the result, do as I did. An 18 inch square hole through the two brick walls, a 2 foot sheet of 1/8 aluminium outside and inside, drilled together, and fitted with a selection of cable glands. The space in the cavity wall is filled with insulation. But it's my house....not very practical if you rent. The very long SO239 type back to backs weren't long enough. But how often do I need to disconnect?
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N1DVJ
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« Reply #7 on: December 14, 2010, 12:11:53 PM »

I've seen the SO-239 back to backs up to 11"  

Not especially easy to find, but not that hard either.

I was selling weather stations with an optional UHF pager, and I had to be able to provide antenna feedthroughs for 'race trailers'.  

I don't recall where I got them, and I had to buy a minimum, but they are out there...  I seem to recall they were available in 1/2" increments up to a certain size, then 1" increments after that.

I see that RadioWorks stocks them in 2", 4" and 6" sizes.  Each for under $7.  Cablexperts for under $6.
« Last Edit: December 14, 2010, 12:19:42 PM by Mike Yetsko » Logged
N1GNV
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« Reply #8 on: December 15, 2010, 05:37:11 AM »

Lexan -- a trade name for polycarbonate sheet -- is also **MUCH** friendlier to work with.  Plexiglass will chip, crack, and melt easily.  Lexan is easier to machine than wood.  It's handy stuff to have around for all kinds of projects.  A trip to the local window place (with a box of donuts in hand) will provide enough "scraps" to keep you going for quite a while.  For sealing the gap at the top of the window, a piece of foam pipe insulation works well and is usually invisible behind the window frame.

73, John Bee, N1GNV
Quicksilver Radio
www.qsradio.com
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73 de John Bee, N1GNV
Quicksilver Radio
http://www.qsradio.com
See us at Dayton Booths 462-463-464-465-469-470-471-472
And at Hamfests throughout the East Coast and Midwest
K8AXW
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« Reply #9 on: December 17, 2010, 07:58:01 PM »

N1GNV makes the most important point here when working with plastic.  It is pretty difficult to drill holes in Plexiglas without either melting it or busting it all up. Small holes melt the Plexiglas and large drill bits tend to grab and break Plexiglas.

Lexan is the stuff to get for drilling and cutting.  Google McMaster-Carr for your needs.  They have EVERYTHING and will sell you what you need and the shipping costs are very reasonable.

But, you can fabricate this window device from wood and it is easy to seal against the weather.  Any hardware store sells insulating foam to seal any opening. If I had to use the window option, I'd make it from wood and save a buncha bucks.

I had the same problem and I just drilled/busted/punched a hole through the hollow opening in one of the foundation concrete blocks, inserted a piece of gray (all weather) PVC pipe and ran all my cables through that.  I sealed the pipe hole with foam insulation that comes in an aerosol can.  The only drawback is that you can't include parallel feed lines with your other cables.

The PVC pipe ends can be sealed with something called Tranoseal or ductseal.  It is a putty like substance that never gets hard or shrinks.  This is good because if you need to add or remove a cable, just pull the ductseal out and do you what you need to do and then reinsert it and mould it around the opening again.  I terminated all of my cables in a large metal box abut 6ft from the wall.  During bad weather I pull the cables from the box and roll them up back against the house with the connectors protected from the weather by a shield.

73

Al - K8AXW
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WA5CVI
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« Reply #10 on: December 18, 2010, 05:52:44 AM »

I wanted to thank everyone for their time. Actually, I think that I would like to take the least invasive approach and use Lexan. I like being able to still see out of the part that has the insert. My hope is to use twin lead and run it from a 120 ft dipole and run it into two feed thru insulators spaced the correct distance apart, mounted in the Lexan. I have been off the air for many years, so this is sort of a new adventure for me.
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