Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Question on old Canadian licensing standards  (Read 6674 times)
AB2T
Member

Posts: 246




Ignore
« on: December 16, 2010, 11:06:13 AM »

Yesterday I finally got around to finishing up my Canadian licensing.  The code test was 5 wpm receive, no problem.  There was a sending test also.  Let me just say that I passed the sending, but my straight key fist was an utterly incomprehensible 13 wpm.  Hadn't used a hand key in at least 15 years or so.  Don't expect me around SKN anytime soon.  All in all, the code test was fun.  It reminded me of when I sat for the Novice as a kid.  Grin      

Anyway, afterwards I was talking to an older ham.  He told me that the decline in CW testing standards took place over a longer span of time than American restructuring.  Supposedly the code tests were 10 wpm for the intermediate license and 15 wpm for the full license.  Then the standards dropped to 5 wpm and 12 wpm.  Now the 5 wpm is still there but few take it as one can get on HF without it.  I only took it so I could apply to be an examiner.    

How did the Canadian testing program evolve over time?

73, Jordan  
Logged
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3880




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: December 16, 2010, 04:24:30 PM »

Here's one data point:

My 1964 ARRL Handbook has a section in Chapter 1 about Canadian licensing.

Here's what it was like in 1964:

- The first license was the Amateur Radio Operator Certificate. It gave full CW privileges on all bands and 'phone privileges on 6 meters and higher.

- Canadian amateurs had to be at least 15 years old

- Exam fee for an operator license was 50 cents; upon passing the operator exam, a station license could be applied for. Station license fee was $2.50 per year (a bit of money in 1964!)

- Exams were held at regional offices of the Department of Transport. Provisional licenses could be obtained by Canadians who lived far from the offices but were only good for 12 months. (The idea was that a provisional licensee could get to an exam session within a year).

- Exam was in three parts: 10 wpm Morse Code, written technical exam, and an oral exam.

After 6 months of CW operation, the holder of an Amateur Radio Operator certificate could get it endorsed to permit 'phone operation on the 11 and 10 meter bands. (Canadian hams still had 11 meters in 1964)

- For full 'phone privileges, the holder of an Amateur Radio Operator certificate had to upgrade to the Advanced Amateur Radio Operator Certificate. This required 15 wpm code and more-involved written and oral exams.

- If a person held a First, Second or Special Radio Operator's Certificate, they could upgrade to Advanced without further exam.

- Power limit was 750 watts input

- Licenses were limited to citizens of Canada, citizens of other British Commonwealth countries, and to qualified immigrants (but immigrants had 6 years to become citizens or lose the license).

- The Canadian amateur bands were similar to the US bands of the time, with two exceptions: Canadians still had 11 meters, and the Canadian HF 'phone subbands were wider than the US ones. For example, back then the US 75 meter band was 3800 to 4000 but the Canadian 75 meter band was 3725 to 4000.

----

My 1957 and earlier Handbooks say nothing about Canadian licensing. My 1967 Handbook lists the power limit as 1000 watts. My 1969 Handbook has nothing about Canadian licensing.


73 de Jim, N2EY
« Last Edit: December 16, 2010, 04:28:44 PM by James Miccolis » Logged
AB2T
Member

Posts: 246




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2010, 07:41:04 PM »

Thanks Jim.  Interesting history.

- Exam fee for an operator license was 50 cents; upon passing the operator exam, a station license could be applied for. Station license fee was $2.50 per year (a bit of money in 1964!)

Around $15 in 2009 dollars.  Not much per year, but it adds up.  I've always thought of ham station fees as regressive taxes.  I'm glad the FCC never imposed such a tax on American amateurs.

- Exams were held at regional offices of the Department of Transport. Provisional licenses could be obtained by Canadians who lived far from the offices but were only good for 12 months. (The idea was that a provisional licensee could get to an exam session within a year).

It took me three months to find an exam session in Quebec's largest city.  I would not be surprised if some of the conditionals lapsed before getting to the field office.  The rural Canadian prairies are sparsely populated and brutally cold this time of year.

- Licenses were limited to citizens of Canada, citizens of other British Commonwealth countries, and to qualified immigrants (but immigrants had 6 years to become citizens or lose the license).

Glad that rule was dropped, or I'd have a tough time operating under the reciprocal treaty for 5+ years.  I don't know if Industry Canada will let me be an examiner since I'm an American.  It'd be nice to examine new club members. 

Now that I can trustee, it's off to wheel and deal with the university student council boards for some money.  Hopefully I can get some sponsorship from the Engineering dep't. I have my old Kenwood hybrid here, but I suspect that in this age of instant gratification it'd be better to get a solid state rig with autotune.  I'm looking forward to making some wire antennas.  It might be a good learning experience for prospective and new hams.

73, Jordan
Logged
N3DF
Member

Posts: 252




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2010, 03:59:07 PM »

"From Spark to Space; The Story of Amateur Radio in Canada" (Saskatoon Amateur Radio Club, 1968) reprints the first set of Canadian radiotelegraph regulations (June 1914).  The one class of Amateur Experimental Stations could not exceed 1/2 kilowatt "at the terminals of the transformer." Permitted wavelengths depended upon the distance from "a commercial coast or land station or a route of navigation."  As to operator qualifications, the regulations provided that:

"Candidates for an amateur certificate will be examined in the adjustment and operation of the apparatus they propose to operate and will be required to have a satisfactory knowledge of the Departmental regulations governing the working of amateur experimental stations [regulations cited]....

The examinations will be practical and viva voce [i.e., oral] and the candidates will be required to send and receive in the International Morse Code at a speed of not less than five words a minute and to distinguish from other signals the signals "SOS", "STP" and the call signal of his station when repeated several times at a speed of ten words a minute."

The dual code-speed requirement seems interesting and unique.  I suppose that "STP" meant "stop transmitting"Huh


Neil N3DF/Miami
Logged

Neil N3DF
AB2T
Member

Posts: 246




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: December 17, 2010, 10:20:32 PM »

The examinations will be practical and viva voce [i.e., oral] and the candidates will be required to send and receive in the International Morse Code at a speed of not less than five words a minute and to distinguish from other signals the signals "SOS", "STP" and the call signal of his station when repeated several times at a speed of ten words a minute."

This code test started with a weird procedural signal KA, dadidadidah, and ended with AR.  What the heck is KA?  Never heard of it before.

Also, the Canadian test wasn't a mock QSO.  Rather it was just two sentences. Remember, this is 5 wpm, so there's not much that can be sent in three minutes.  I learned about the influence of meteor showers on HF frequencies.  Could've been "drink more Ovaltine" for all I care  Roll Eyes

I suppose the older code exams were similar, but with longer texts.

It's sad that this will be the last time I will ever take a code test now that they have been eliminated in most countries. 

73, Jordan
Logged
N4KZ
Member

Posts: 599




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2010, 06:50:50 AM »

KA as a prosign means start of transmission. Its use has largely faded from the scene. After all, indicating start of transmission is kind of meaningless once you've started transmitting! I was licensed as a novice in 1969 and encountered a few OT hams who still began each transmission with KA. I wonder if it wasn't a holdover from the ship-to-shore service as in "I'm about to begin passing traffic to you" or something similar.

Anyway, I've haven't heard anyone use the KA prosign in 35 to 40 years.

73, N4KZ
Logged
N3DF
Member

Posts: 252




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: December 20, 2010, 10:38:53 AM »

The examinations will be practical and viva voce [i.e., oral] and the candidates will be required to send and receive in the International Morse Code at a speed of not less than five words a minute and to distinguish from other signals the signals "SOS", "STP" and the call signal of his station when repeated several times at a speed of ten words a minute."

Also, the Canadian test wasn't a mock QSO.  Rather it was just two sentences. Remember, this is 5 wpm, so there's not much that can be sent in three minutes.  I learned about the influence of meteor showers on HF frequencies.  Could've been "drink more Ovaltine" for all I care  Roll Eyes

When I took the Amateur Extra code test in Manhattan about 1970, it consisted of ship position reports (latitude and longitude).  It was given on a great old code machine with large visible tubes and took a while to warm up to speed. 
Logged

Neil N3DF
WD9EWK
Member

Posts: 249


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #7 on: December 21, 2010, 08:43:06 PM »

Hi Jordan!

I don't know if Industry Canada will let me be an examiner since I'm an American.  It'd be nice to examine new club members. 

The RIC-1 document from Industry Canada is silent when it comes to any citizenship requirements.  As long as you're at least 18 years old, you meet the other requirements (holding a certificate with all 3 qualifications - Basic, Advanced, and Morse - and have Internet access).  Now you only need to find a radio club, educational institution, or your RAC regional director to sponsor you as an examiner. 

You can read RIC-1 at:

http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf01007.html

Good luck and 73!





Patrick WD9EWK/VA7EWK
http://www.wd9ewk.net/

Logged

Patrick WD9EWK/VA7EWK
http://www.wd9ewk.net/
AD7XN
Member

Posts: 36




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2011, 04:26:02 PM »

In the new issue of QST the article-A Flexible Audio Limiter Using a Shunt Diode String- the writer shows three call signs by his name.  How does that work ?

In the bio it claims that his CURRENT call signs are these three mentioned above.
Logged
WD9EWK
Member

Posts: 249


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #9 on: January 13, 2011, 08:04:43 AM »

In the new issue of QST the article-A Flexible Audio Limiter Using a Shunt Diode String- the writer shows three call signs by his name.  How does that work ?

In the bio it claims that his CURRENT call signs are these three mentioned above.

If you are referring to 3 Canadian call signs, Canadian hams are allowed to hold more than one call sign.  Additional call signs cost C$ 60.  Canadian hams are limited to one call sign with a 2-letter suffix, but can hold multiple calls with 3-letter suffixes.   

More information on the policy for call signs in Canada is available in the Industry Canada RIC-9 document, "Call Sign Policy and Special Event Prefixes", at:

http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf02102.html

73!





Patrick WD9EWK/VA7EWK
http://www.wd9ewk.net/

Logged

Patrick WD9EWK/VA7EWK
http://www.wd9ewk.net/
AB2T
Member

Posts: 246




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: January 14, 2011, 11:33:26 PM »

In the new issue of QST the article-A Flexible Audio Limiter Using a Shunt Diode String- the writer shows three call signs by his name.  How does that work ?

In the bio it claims that his CURRENT call signs are these three mentioned above.

If you are referring to 3 Canadian call signs, Canadian hams are allowed to hold more than one call sign.  Additional call signs cost C$ 60.  Canadian hams are limited to one call sign with a 2-letter suffix, but can hold multiple calls with 3-letter suffixes.   

More information on the policy for call signs in Canada is available in the Industry Canada RIC-9 document, "Call Sign Policy and Special Event Prefixes", at:

http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf02102.html

73!


I strongly suspect that the vast majority of Canadian hams have only one call.  Just my suspicion.  Wonder if there are any stats on this.

73, Jordan VA2AIT
Logged
VE3LHY
Member

Posts: 1




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: January 19, 2011, 07:49:23 AM »

I do have 2 call signs issued, a  VA3LHY (2000) and my primary call VE3LHY (since 1978).
I'm an Accredited Volunteer Examiner by the way only in the Province of Ontario.
from Oct. 2010  to Oct. 2013.

I had to go through an ORAL EXAM during those years in Aug. 1978. And had to pass the 10 WPM code.
The oral exams were part of the whole process in getting a HAM License back then.
Applicants had to describe and explain the stages of a superhet receiver from the Antenna to the Speaker.
also explain orally what a power supply stages do from AC to being converted to DC.
It was termed a "License" back then, but when they restructured the process, now called a "CERTIFICATE".
The DOC- Department of Communications issued 2 papers back then. A "Station License" and
"Amateur License"  or "Advanced License". That DOC department is now taken over by Industry Canada.
  
73.....de....VE3LHY
« Last Edit: January 19, 2011, 07:58:57 AM by VE3LHY » Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!