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Author Topic: Power wiring for a Honda CR-V?  (Read 3567 times)
WS8X
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Posts: 10




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« on: December 28, 2010, 06:27:02 PM »

Hello,

I'm preparing to install a 2M mobile rig in my 08' Honda CR-V. Does anyone have any tips about power wiring to the battery w/ these vehicles? i.e. How to route the power leads from the radio, through the firewall, and to the battery terminals?

These vehicles seem to be pretty popular, so I was hoping someone might have some experience with them.

Thanks in advance!

73

Joe
WS8X
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K1CJS
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« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2010, 04:31:26 AM »

I know newer cars have more padding and sound absorbing materials in them, but the things to look for remain the same.  Look at both sides of the firewall near where the steering post goes through it or at some other easily identifiable spot.  Look at where harnesses and other connections from the drivers compartment get through into the engine compartment.  Sometimes you can wiggle enough space to get the power wires through an existing grommet--although that isn't as easy as it used to be on older cars.

If you can see a good place, examine it thouroughly on BOTH SIDES to make sure that there won't be any issues--moving parts, etc. that would slice into the wires.  Sometimes you can--very carefully--cut a small hole in an oversized grommet and get your wires through there, then seal the cut with a dab of silicone sealer.

All it takes is patience and common sense.  Good Luck!
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K0BG
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« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2010, 06:38:03 AM »

Visit my web site.

There is an easy way to get wiring into the cabin of most late model Hondas. The pass through is enough to pass a pair of #8s, but not large enough for the requisite fuse holders. The best way around this is to use Power POle connectors to splice the power cable.
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WS8X
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« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2010, 06:03:33 PM »

Thanks much for the reply K1CJS and K0BG! Alan, I had a look around your site. Very useful and well laid out site. Nice job! I read through much of the info you have up there. There's plenty to digest! I see that you're mobile with your Honda Ridgeline. Could you provide a bit more specifics on suggested entry points on newer Hondas?

Thanks!

Joe
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K0BG
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« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2010, 06:08:25 PM »

Actually, Joe it is on the web site.

If you look at the near center of the firewall, just under the rear lip which meet with the rear of the hood, you'll notice a small plastic plug. The hole is 12 mm (about 1/2 inch). On the inside, there is a partial cutout (it looks like three small arcs), and under that a cutout in the insulation. It is not easy to see from either side, but if you pull back the floor insulation on the inside, you can see the end of the plug. If you still can't find it, ask your local sound shop to point to it.
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WS8X
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« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2010, 09:49:26 AM »

Found it Alan. Thanks for the assist!

Happy New Year,

Joe
WS8X
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N6JSX
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« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2011, 12:24:45 PM »

My 2002 CR-V sports a IC-7000 and IC-2800 (50w). I always get very good reports!  Grin

I installed dual 10AWG thru the firewall at the steering/accelerator area - it was rather easy to push thru the gaskets.  VDC was by attaching to under-hood fuse box next to the battery.  IC-7000 at 100W CW, I measured a VDC line drop of only 0.3VDC - good enough for me. Length of wire acts as a resistor to current at 15VDC - I could have gone to one 10AWG but redundancy insures efficiency and reduced heat losses (something that is often not taken into consideration).

FYI, ya know what CR-V stands for..... when I bought it new they had to call Japan to find out, ya got to love this.... "Comfortable Riding Vehicle" (with the hardest seats I've ever sat on), how original.

Go to my Yahoo group to see pictures of my screwdriver custom made spare tire bracket mount. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/RDF-USA/files/Technical/

Truck EE design standards are:
Wire Gauge....Protective Device Size...............Max Current
18 AWG........10 AMP Fuse/ Circuit Breaker.......8 A
16 AWG........15 AMP Fuse/ Circuit Breaker.......12 A
14 AWG........20 AMP Fuse/ Circuit Breaker.......16 A
12 AWG........25 AMP Fuse/ Circuit Breaker.......20 A
10 AWG........30 AMP Fuse/ Circuit Breaker.......24 A
8 AWG.........12 Gauge Fusible Link..................80 A
6 AWG.........10 Gauge Fusible Link..................108 A
4 AWG.........two–12 Gauge Fusible Link............160 A


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K0BG
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« Reply #7 on: January 02, 2011, 01:06:03 PM »

Kuby, when you wire a vehicle, you really can't take amperage ratings out of a book. The main consideration is voltage drop. For example, the power cable with comes with the 7000 has a drop very nearly .5 volts at the rated current draw of the radio (23 amps).

The suggestion of using circuit breakers is questionable as well, if for no other reason than their hysteresis is somewhat longer than a fuse. As for fusible links, I wouldn't use one on a bet. GM and Chrysler learned the hard way when their fusible links started electrical fires.
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