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Author Topic: Windows 10 SP1 released today  (Read 34673 times)
KAPT4560
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Posts: 203




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« Reply #210 on: December 25, 2015, 03:05:53 AM »

 Working as a DoD contractor, our company had to upgrade from xp to Win7 as xp support ended years ago. We had no choice.
 Some of the programs that worked so comfortably with xp didn't like the new Win7 OS too well.
 ProductionPro and TestStand were written for xp and the software companies that supplied those programs had little in the way of support or suggestions for us. Basically we were on our own.
 Although IT was studying the 'possible' compatibility issues before the changeover took place, they could not contemplate or prepare for all the variables that might come up. We were not prepared for the computers going down upon changeover.
  It works now (somewhat) with occasional 'glitches'. Patches and work-arounds are frustrating when you are used to a system that worked so well before.
 Because of factory dependence on computers, it almost brought us to our knees. Our network is on an 'intranet' with little interface with the internet. We are told that it is secure.
 When an assembly line with a production deadline and everything downstream of that is standing around waiting for IT to get things up again, it is a bad situation.
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K7EXJ
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Posts: 856




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« Reply #211 on: December 25, 2015, 06:37:57 AM »

We are told that it is secure.
 When an assembly line with a production deadline and everything downstream of that is standing around waiting for IT to get things up again, it is a bad situation.
As long as there is no connection to the Internet and no one is coming in with USB thumb-drives you are probably secure.

The Windows kernel is known as the "New Technology" or "NT" kernel develeoped in the late 1990s and is the basic kernel for Microsoft's "Windows" operating systems even today. Which is why many older applications will still work. The most vulnerable are the applications which make use of specific drivers written for specific processes. And controlling external hardware is probably the worst of these.

I have had clients that kept old NT machines on line because they worked with the Siemens SCADA architecture (of "STUXNET" fame) well. But it seems inevitable that someone manages to get one of them onto the Internet to check email or something. Often with a thumb drive WiFi system. I've seen them wire up modems to their desk telephone so they can "work from home". All of this, of course, destroys the secure nature of an isolated system.

The best way to overcome this is to have duplicate systems... one with access to the Internet and the other without. Mostly they use KVM switches to share keyboards, mice and monitors but the best way is to put the secure system across the room so they have to get up and walk over there. Tongue

The downside to maintaining a backwards-compatible operating system that runs legacy applications is that they will also run legacy malware.
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73s de K7EXJ
Craig Smiley
W8JX
Member

Posts: 9469




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« Reply #212 on: December 25, 2015, 07:02:55 AM »

Working as a DoD contractor, our company had to upgrade from xp to Win7 as xp support ended years ago. We had no choice.
 Some of the programs that worked so comfortably with xp didn't like the new Win7 OS too well.
 ProductionPro and TestStand were written for xp and the software companies that supplied those programs had little in the way of support or suggestions for us. Basically we were on our own.
 Although IT was studying the 'possible' compatibility issues before the changeover took place, they could not contemplate or prepare for all the variables that might come up. We were not prepared for the computers going down upon changeover.
  It works now (somewhat) with occasional 'glitches'. Patches and work-arounds are frustrating when you are used to a system that worked so well before.
 Because of factory dependence on computers, it almost brought us to our knees. Our network is on an 'intranet' with little interface with the internet. We are told that it is secure.
 When an assembly line with a production deadline and everything downstream of that is standing around waiting for IT to get things up again, it is a bad situation.


Apps that worked well with XP but not Vista or 7 was not because of flaws with newer OS but rather because XP was far more tolerant of poorly written code and supported hybrid Win16/32 apps written for old Win 9x platform that were never properly updated/recompiled in proper Win 32 API. With issues like this you need to take your beef to software author that is either too lazy or too cheap to spend time and effort to properly update app code. But for many it is easier to blame MS.
« Last Edit: December 25, 2015, 09:02:21 AM by W8JX » Logged

--------------------------------------
Ham since 1969....  Old School 20 WPM Extra
AC7CW
Member

Posts: 604




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« Reply #213 on: December 25, 2015, 11:08:19 AM »

We are told that it is secure.
 When an assembly line with a production deadline and everything downstream of that is standing around waiting for IT to get things up again, it is a bad situation.
As long as there is no connection to the Internet and no one is coming in with USB thumb-drives you are probably secure.

The Windows kernel is known as the "New Technology" or "NT" kernel develeoped in the late 1990s and is the basic kernel for Microsoft's "Windows" operating systems even today. Which is why many older applications will still work. The most vulnerable are the applications which make use of specific drivers written for specific processes. And controlling external hardware is probably the worst of these.

I have had clients that kept old NT machines on line because they worked with the Siemens SCADA architecture (of "STUXNET" fame) well. But it seems inevitable that someone manages to get one of them onto the Internet to check email or something. Often with a thumb drive WiFi system. I've seen them wire up modems to their desk telephone so they can "work from home". All of this, of course, destroys the secure nature of an isolated system.

The best way to overcome this is to have duplicate systems... one with access to the Internet and the other without. Mostly they use KVM switches to share keyboards, mice and monitors but the best way is to put the secure system across the room so they have to get up and walk over there. Tongue

The downside to maintaining a backwards-compatible operating system that runs legacy applications is that they will also run legacy malware.


Commercial software is far worse than consumer stuff. Consumers will start finding something better in a heartbeat but you guys are pretty well stuck with the commercial stuff and the vendors know it. I used a CAD program that ran on Unix. I was finding all sorts of bugs which I reported but eventually I was told to stop reporting anything that didn't utterly crash the machine because nobody would work on them.
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