Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Turbo Tuner question  (Read 10927 times)
N5MOA
Member

Posts: 1110




Ignore
« on: February 01, 2011, 11:31:11 AM »

If you move from one band to another, does the turbo tuner know which way to start looking (up or down) for a match, or does it just move around till it finds one?

In other words, if going from 17m to 40m, does it know to start moving down?
Logged
WV4L
Member

Posts: 141


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2011, 11:57:10 AM »

If the TT is set up properly, yes, it should go to the proper position.
Logged
N5MOA
Member

Posts: 1110




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2011, 12:04:39 PM »

Thanks for the reply.

 I'm needing to replace my other controller,  the turns counter part of it has gone south, and the TT seems like a better solution.


Logged
K0BG
Member

Posts: 9883


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2011, 03:03:46 PM »

Maybe. There are occasions where it will move in the wrong direction. If you go to my web site, and look under Antenna Controllers, you see the whole discussion.
Logged

N5MOA
Member

Posts: 1110




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2011, 05:29:59 PM »

I see this on your site in regards to the TT:

In some cases, the antenna motor will be going in the wrong direction. Once it hits its travel limit (and the stall current preset is adjusted correctly), it reverses and goes back the other way. If the SWR limit is set incorrectly (especially on 80 meters), it will cycle through its opposite travel limit. Some units have a built in limit for the number of cycles, but all of them can cause excessive motor wear if not setup correctly. That is to say, the SWR detection level, motor stall and operating current, and motor direction settings must be correct for your installation. I emphasize your, because variations in manufacturing tolerances, and the length and wire size used make each installation unique.

It is also important to follow the manufacturers' instructions when setting the SWR detection parameters (see below). Of the 50 or so installations I have critiqued over the last four years or so, this is one of the most common problems. Some of the others are, improperly setting the motor stall current parameter, not reading between the lines in the manual (this may be facetious, but it is factual), and very poor wiring practices (both RF and DC). Remember, it pays to take time to do the job correctly the first time around, as rework is always more expensive, and it is always the most exasperating of duties.



I gather from that if the TT is setup properly it works fine. Or did I read it incorrectly?

My radio/antenna is already setup properly.

On another note, some of the info about the MFJ-1924 you have posted is incorrect.

     "There are a few drawbacks to them. If power is lost to the controller, all of the memory   positions go away."

It does not lose presets when power is removed.


       "Another basic problem with the MFJ units, is their sequential programming. In other words, to reset the position (frequency) on just one band, you have to go through all of the bands."

Any band can be preset/reset in any order, at any time. One or all.

         "Speaking of parking. MFJ has redesigned their MFJ-1924 (Ameritron SDC-102B). It now automatically parks the antenna (assumedly when you turn off your radio)."


Autoparking is accomplished by holding the "up" and "down" button at the same time for a couple of seconds. Otherwise, it stays where you left it when powered off.

I've been using a MFJ-1924 for about 3 years. It works pretty well, but the turns counter is only reading one direction, up. I'm still using it, I just have to watch the swr meter in the radio to tell where I'm at.

Since I like to watch the road while driving, the TT sounds like a better solution as opposed to replacing the MFJ.

73, Tom
N5MOA





« Last Edit: February 02, 2011, 05:27:15 AM by N5MOA » Logged
K0BG
Member

Posts: 9883


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2011, 08:49:47 AM »

The MFJ units do not use nonvolatile memory. That is why they tell you to power it separately.

I do know they changed the programming on the later models, but the three I have owned all used sequential programming. You start at 10 meter (or 6) and go down through each band you have turned on.

The TT I have is about 6 years old, and was attached to an Icom 706, and was powered by the radio. At the first tuning, you had a 50-50 chance of it going the correct direction. After the initial QSY it worked fine, until you turned it off. I was told they changed that, but my in box  would indicate otherwise.
Logged

N5MOA
Member

Posts: 1110




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: February 02, 2011, 01:03:54 PM »

I would have thought you would update your website info if you knew a product was updated.

 I mentioned the incorrect info because I thought you might like to know. Do with it as you see fit.

I haven't read of any problems with a  TT/TS-480 combo.

One is on the way, so I quess I will know for myself soon enough.

73, Tom
N5MOA
« Last Edit: February 02, 2011, 01:13:18 PM by N5MOA » Logged
K0BG
Member

Posts: 9883


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2011, 08:15:53 AM »

The problems is simply one of time and money. I'm retired, and I could fine the time. However, I don't have unlimited funds to try everything out there. I try not to do installs any more, for a variety of reasons, not the least of which is no one wants to pay for them! I did do four this past year, and one of those was a SDC-103. It wasn't any different than the one I had 4 years ago. The buttons are flaky, which is its biggest drawback.

There are really only two units I'd own, and that's the BetterRF, or the Turbo Tuner if I owned something else other than a Icom.
Logged

WB6KIO
Member

Posts: 4




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: September 26, 2011, 10:47:40 AM »

 Angry I've had nothing but grief since I purchased my "Turbo Tuner". Purchased mine this past year and it wouldn't operate as it was advertised and it was anything but "Turbo". Called up on the phone the 1st time and was asked to adjust dip switches in the tuner. It didn't make any difference so I called a 2nd time and was asked to send it back to them for a refund. I did just that this past July and here it is almost October and still no comunication from them at all !  I reccomend people not do business with N2VZ Enterprises unless they want terrible customer service!!!WB6KIO/Steve Angry
Logged
N5UD
Member

Posts: 814




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: October 03, 2011, 06:58:00 PM »

Which model radio and antenna are trying to use the TT with ?

73 Tony N5UD
Logged
K0BG
Member

Posts: 9883


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #10 on: October 04, 2011, 01:45:21 PM »

No matter the antenna, or the controller (BetterRF or the Turbo Tuner), you have to follow the instructions!!

The key to using any automatic antenna controller is choking off the RF from the control leads, and the coax cable (common mode). From my personal experience, almost no one get it right the first time.

I've seen some installs so bad, it is a wonder they work at all. Yet, the owners always site how much DX they've managed to work. I just wonder what they would say if they had a correct mobile setup.
Logged

GOLDTR8
Member

Posts: 58




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: October 08, 2011, 06:21:16 AM »

I use my TT with a Scorpion antenna.  The system is well choked, bonded, grounded and everything you can do to get a good mobile set up.

I purchased my TT at Dayton, connected everything, set the dip switches and turned it on.  It just plan worked.   Took me all of a few minutes to set it up.  But the rest of the install was up to snuff.

There is only quirk in the system and I think that it is related to my IC-7000.  On the 40m band I have to tune to a lower frequency than I want to operate on.  I have confirmed this with other IC-7000 users so there appears to be a problem with how the 7000 measures swr.  

Other than the quirk above, I change bands, push the tune button and then tx.  It is simple and makes your driving safe.

I am extremely pleased with the purchase.

kd8nnu
« Last Edit: October 08, 2011, 06:24:50 AM by GOLDTR8 » Logged
K0BG
Member

Posts: 9883


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #12 on: October 08, 2011, 06:43:22 AM »

Actually, it is not a problem with the 7000, or any other transceiver—it is a matching problem.

If you go to my web site, and read the Antenna Matching article, you'll have your answer.
Logged

GOLDTR8
Member

Posts: 58




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: October 09, 2011, 06:34:28 AM »

Actually, it is not a problem with the 7000, or any other transceiver—it is a matching problem.

If you go to my web site, and read the Antenna Matching article, you'll have your answer.

I have spent a lot of time doing proper matching and have read the web site many times.  So I need a little more information on why you think it is matching that is causing the shift error for the swr.    If I go thru the setup the numbers are good.   So I am confused a little bit.   If I truly have something not quite right I want to fix it as I would prefer to tune right to the spot I am on.

Thanks KD8NNU
Logged
K0BG
Member

Posts: 9883


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #14 on: October 09, 2011, 12:53:23 PM »

Using a shunt coil is the best way to match a remotely controlled antenna, because the amateur bands are close to harmonically related. This allows a given size coil to be used on all bands, except 160. It would work there too, if there wasn't so much loss in 160 meter loading coils. However, there is just enough difference (coil losses and not directly a harmonic) that 40 meters is always a problem. In other words, it is usually possible to get the SWR down to about 1.3:1 or so using a shunt coil on 80, 20, and up. But on 40, the typical SWR will be about 1.5:1, or perhaps a bit higher. You can compromise between 80, and 40, wherein the SWR will be below 1.5:1 on both bands. Thankfully, on 20 an up it isn't a problem (almost) no matter the 80/40 relationship. The issue then becomes, are we tuning to lowest resonance, or I we tuning to X equaling zero?

The Icom 7000 read out says SWR. The CI-V port command is called SWR too, but in reality it is the phase relationship being reported (from ØØh to FFh). Hence, the issue you bring up.

It is easily corrected by compromising between 80 and 40 meters with respect to the shunt adjustment.
Logged

Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!