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Author Topic: activity on 6 meters  (Read 1613 times)
WB2JNA
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Posts: 92




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« on: February 03, 2011, 05:06:26 AM »

I live in an apartment and am thinking of trying 6 meters. I would be able to manage just a dipole antenna. Is it likely I'd be able to find many stations to work, or would the activity be limited for me to sporadic band openings only? I'm not very well versed about the band so my question may seem sort of vague, sorry about that. I would only have about 5-7 watts output, CW, SSB or PSK. Thanks.
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AA4PB
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« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2011, 05:30:09 AM »

It kind of depends on where the dipole is located. If it's on a 5th story roof it might work pretty well. If its inside the apartment or in the attic you probably won't make many contacts unless there are 6M stations located within a few miles of you.

There is little to no PSK31 activity on 6M, even during band openings in my experience. I'm not sure why that is, but most activity is SSB with a little CW.
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AI4WC
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« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2011, 07:20:52 AM »

I live in an apartment, too.  On my second floor balcony with my M2 6M loop, I work all over the Eastern US and some of the Caribbean WHEN OPENINGS OCCUR.  Nothing is predictable and low power is working against you.  All antennas are compromises and I have to rely on a Hamstick Dipole setup.  It's noisy, but when the bands open up, I talk with some success to Europe and all over this hemisphere.  In spite of my limited success, I know that the best antenna you can put up and afford, followed by higher power when needed, is the key to success.  Nothing beats a lot of aluminum tubes or copper wire oriented properly at a good height above the ground. Someday......, but you know the rest; spend more on the antenna setup - first.
73,
Jim
AI4WC
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KB2FCV
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« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2011, 10:31:31 AM »

I used to live in an apartment where I had access to the attic. I had 100 watts to a dipole up there (mind you, a crappy dipole with radio shack RG-58 I had laying around). I was able to work 6m openings into the midwest and south. I even worked an opening to europe - spain to be exact! I have the QSL to prove it. I even made 3 or 4 meteor scatter QSO's. While attic antennas aren't that great, they aren't the end of the world either.
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AA4PB
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« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2011, 01:39:52 PM »

Very true that you can work 6M DX during a good band opening with a typical attic antenna. You aren't likely to reach out to 75-100 miles or more during normal conditions with the typical attic antenna though, especially with 5-7 watts. The limited range (maybe 10-20 miles, depending on terrain) is going to greatly reduce the number of "normal" contacts you make. Of course it all depends on how many 6M ops there are in your 20 mile radius, how active they are, and what type of antennas they have.

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WB2JNA
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« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2011, 05:49:28 AM »

Thanks to everyone for lots of good info.
73, Jeff
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KB0XR
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Posts: 39




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« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2011, 06:20:01 AM »

I've got a dipole 8 feet high hidden under my 2nd story deck.  When the band is open, I work all over the US but mainly into the SE states.  My MJF 9406X with about 10 watts output is a nice little inexpensive way to enjoy 6 meters.

73
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