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Author Topic: Poor phonetics and yelling in the mike  (Read 20189 times)
KA5N
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Posts: 4380




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« on: March 07, 2011, 03:12:30 AM »

The just completed DX contest shows once again that the hams who insist on yelling into the mike and talking fast are the cause of more repeats and busted call signs than anyone else.
Trailing closely are the "funny fonetics" dudes.  It seems to me that the old standard phonetics were easier to understand (Able, Baker, etc) than the new standard.  (Except I never liked
foxtrot I mean imagine a call like W5FTS  Wiskey five foxtrot twist samba  ie an all dance
set of phonetics).
Anyway please don't yell and if you must do it slowly.

Allen
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SWMAN
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Posts: 543




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« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2011, 03:58:39 AM »

 I am new to contesting and I noticed this also. I seems like some of the stations are in a big hurry when talking or had way to much coffee. I was hoping that they would slow down a bit. 73 Jim KF5HRN
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N4NYY
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« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2011, 04:35:54 AM »

There were some bad OPS for this contest. There were several that I had to wait for til I could figure out their call sign.
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N5MOA
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Posts: 1014




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« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2011, 07:24:29 AM »

There were some bad OPS for this contest. There were several that I had to wait for til I could figure out their call sign.


Stations not ID'ing very often was also a problem.

Nothing quite like coming across a pileup, waiting for a station to ID, only to find, after 8 or 9 qsos, you had already worked them.  Tongue

I'm not a serious contester, so I usually waited for the ID before spinning the dial.

The other side of that was the stateside ops who worked them, then asked for their call. Wonder how many dupes that caused?

73, Tom

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N4NYY
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« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2011, 09:32:28 AM »

No so much the station not IDing, as much as the racers using phonetics. It sounded like a call in one syllable and breath.
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N3QE
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Posts: 2029




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« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2011, 12:52:10 PM »

There were some bad OPS for this contest. There were several that I had to wait for til I could figure out their call sign.
All the same... rather than fume about poor ops, I prefer to think of the top-notch, most exmplary, ops and commend them. ID'ing after every QSO is one of the classiest moves the good ops make. In the past contest, for example, NP4Z and AY9F really stood proud in terms of efficient operating and ID'ing while running. What's a little sad, is that it is tempting for me to say "well, they had to be ID'ing clearly because they were QRP" when really that gets the causality wrong. All stations, whether they are california kilowatts or not, could be operating that smoothly and effectively and boosting their scores.

A lot of multi-multi stations have a couple top-notch ops and a couple mediocre ops. Not "evil" or "bad", just not that good. A 48-hour contest wears a lot of them down, too. So they often deserve to be cut a lot slack.
« Last Edit: March 07, 2011, 01:26:40 PM by N3QE » Logged
AE4RV
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« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2011, 01:20:33 PM »

The vast majority of the ops I worked in the recent CW and SSB DX tests were excellent. That might also explain how they were able to hear my little signal.
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K0IZ
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« Reply #7 on: March 07, 2011, 03:01:05 PM »

To add to the pile of gripes, how about grossly excessive processing (clipping, compression) of audio.  Super high background noise, distorted audio.  I wondered in some cases how the other station was able to understand.
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AB8AL
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Posts: 19




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« Reply #8 on: March 09, 2011, 07:36:32 AM »

If your are going to write a post complaining about the use of proper phonetics.  Maybe you should research what they are.

Alpha, Barvo etc. 

Your example ABLE, Baker is no better then what you are complaining about.

Terry
AB8AL
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KG4RUL
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« Reply #9 on: March 09, 2011, 08:04:49 AM »

If your are going to write a post complaining about the use of proper phonetics.  Maybe you should research what they are.

Alpha, Barvo etc. 

Your example ABLE, Baker is no better then what you are complaining about.

Terry
AB8AL

That's a new one for me!!!    Cheesy
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VE4EGL
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Posts: 23




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« Reply #10 on: March 09, 2011, 10:40:59 AM »

If your are going to write a post complaining about the use of proper phonetics.  Maybe you should research what they are.

Alpha, Barvo etc. 

Your example ABLE, Baker is no better then what you are complaining about.

Terry
AB8AL

His "able, baker" was an example of the old American phonetic alphabet (it ran from 1941 to 1956, in case you're a trivia buff), saying it was easier to understand than the "funny" phonetics, not that it was the correct set to use.  Just a minor misunderstanding.  Smiley  Though speaking of funny phonetics, I almost died laughing when one of our club members logged a contest QSO with a callsign ending in "super pickle".

Personally, I don't use fancy phonetics for my callsign (though I have been tempted to call VE4-extremely-good-looking), especially during a contest.  Your QSO might be halfway drowned out by unintentional interference from others so it's much easier to pick up "echo golf lima" than something you need a minute to process.

I have yet to have the pleasure of someone yelling into the mic or talking like an auctioneer after six cups of coffee.  Guess I'm one of the lucky ones, but it seems to me that like CW the emphasis with voice contacts should be on clarity, not speed, especially during a contest.
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I used to think you needed an elaborate setup to work DX, then I made a QSO 3,000 miles away using a dipole 8ft off the ground in the middle of a forest.
NW0M
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Posts: 24




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« Reply #11 on: March 09, 2011, 02:21:52 PM »

I don't know - I heard a good one in a contest last year from a callsign ending FUW and his phonetic was Fat Ugly Wife.  I assumed he was divorced...   Tongue
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K0OD
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Posts: 2520




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« Reply #12 on: March 09, 2011, 06:54:15 PM »

 
Quote
It seems to me that the old standard phonetics were easier to understand (Able, Baker, etc) than the new standard.

There is no standard. Phonetics preceded radio. Western Union had phonetics for reading telegraph messages long ago. ARRL once had their own for ham use. Newspapers and wire services had their phonetics. Taxi companies too. Some people think the NATO phonetics are a standard (with their silly Niner for nine).  And yes some phonetics are plain bad... like Kilowatt for K, Foxtrot for F and the asinine Tare for T under the common 1940s/1950s U.S. military phonetics.

Do you know what a tare is?  Almost no one does!

Use what works best for Your Call, and Your Voice, and Your Audience and the prevailing radio conditions. If one set doesn't get your call thru a pileup then switch to another.

The best contest ops don't worry about "standard" phonetics because they've made 100s of thousands of Qs, and the people who create phonetic alphabets haven't made any, in many cases.

By all means, listen to the best contest stations and learn.

(wilco and out)
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PD2R
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Posts: 131




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« Reply #13 on: March 10, 2011, 02:23:51 AM »

I am new to contesting and I noticed this also. I seems like some of the stations are in a big hurry when talking or had way to much coffee. I was hoping that they would slow down a bit. 73 Jim KF5HRN

When you are watching a NASCAR race (or whatever you folks like to watch in the US), do you also wander why they drive so fast and hope they would slow down for a minute?  Wink  Smiley


I too get a little carried away sometimes and raise my voice when working a weak station. When I notice that I'm raising my voice I often crank up the monitor volume.

As for the phonetics, I used to say that people should use proper NATO phonetics. Nowadays I don't really care anymore. I'm even learning to copy call signs without phonetics at all.
I agree with K0OD, use whatever works best given the circumstances.

Best 73, PD2R
PI4DX contest group
« Last Edit: March 10, 2011, 02:25:24 AM by PD2R » Logged
K3TN
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Posts: 278


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« Reply #14 on: March 10, 2011, 03:13:45 AM »

I'd say the vast majority of poor operating I saw in the ARRL SSB DX Contest was by the people *calling* the DX stations:

1. Not listening - calling while the DX station is sending
2. Not listening - calling when the DX station is trying to come back to someone else
3. Not listening - calling when the cluster spot said HN7M when it is actually 5N7M
4. Sending only the last two letters of your callsign

But, of course, those are the same problems (with the addition of calling on the DX stations transmit frequency when he is split) with DXing in general.

John K3TN
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John K3TN
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