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Author Topic: 45 Amp Anderson Power Poles  (Read 2703 times)
KG6MZS
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Posts: 476




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« on: March 08, 2011, 07:08:54 AM »

OK, admittedly I am a mechanical klutz  -- never had great skills there.  But has anybody else had trouble with fitting the stupid 45 amp Anderson power pole dealie into the plastic housing?  The thing barely fits and add any solder or crimping and the X#@!* will NOT go in and click.  Grr.  Any tips or tricks to this?  I am using AGW 10 wire.

It also looks like there are two styles of pins - this is the one I have:

http://www.rcmicroflite.com/Power-Pole-Sermos10-45-AMP-Contacts-_p_153.html

TIA,

73 de Eric, KG6MZS
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KG6BRG
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« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2011, 07:25:20 AM »

I don't know why it won't fit, if you crimp it can't get wider.  Is the contact still flat where it connects to the wire?  It should be.  Don't solder and buy the proper type crimper and you should be good to go.  If you continue to have trouble I would seek out a Power Pole elmer.  They are fabulous connectors and I have never had a problem on 15, 25, or 45 amp applications.  Good luck and post your results if you can. 
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K2YO
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« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2011, 07:40:41 AM »

I've never used the Sermos brand connectors, I only use Andersons. But I think my experiences should be similar.

Yes putting the metal contact into the plastic shell does require a bit if fiddling. I find that smaller guage wires are harder because you can't use the wire to push. You're using heavy guage wire so that's not the problem.

My only suggestion is practice. If you have the removal tool, then practice putting and removing the contact a few times and see if you develop a feel for it. Make sure you don't bend the contact any when you crimp and try angling the contact down a bit when you insert it into the plastic body.

Bernie
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K8GU
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« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2011, 08:04:58 AM »

I've had the same problem with 10 ga wire and the 45A PowerPoles of that style.  The only advice I can give is to be very careful with aligning the wire in the metal contact.  Then, I use a small flat-blade screwdriver as an insertion tool.  You shouldn't force it, but it will take a firm "punch" to get the contacts seated in the connector housings. 

Now that I know about these, I avoid using them.  The only 45A PowerPole I have in my shack presently connects my power supply to my RigRunner.  I use 30A and 15A PPs on everything else.
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KG4RUL
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« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2011, 09:00:46 AM »

First question is what are using to crimp! 

If you are using the ratcheting tool with specifically made dies, the "wings" of the crimp with curl neatly into the wire and the width will end no wider than the contact blade width. 

If you are using the inexpensive plier type crimper, you need to turn the crimped connector 90 degrees and gently squeeze it's width back to the same width as the contact blade.  Proper technique is necessary.

NOTE: A properly crimped PowerPole should NEVER need solder!
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KG6MZS
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« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2011, 11:39:47 AM »

If you are using the inexpensive plier type crimper,

I'm guessing this is the main problem.  Thanks for all the suggestions.  Who makes the best powerpole specific crimper?

T(again)IA

73 de Eric, KG6MZS
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K2YO
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« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2011, 12:58:50 PM »

I have a West Mountain crimper that I'm happy with, but if I were to do it again, I'd get this;
http://www.powerwerx.com/tools-meters/tricrimp-crimping-powerpole-contacts.html

The difference being I like the Power Werx alternate jaws variety better.

Either one are great crimpers.

Bernie
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KE4JOY
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Posts: 1316




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« Reply #7 on: March 08, 2011, 01:03:33 PM »

I've had the same problem with 10 ga wire and the 45A PowerPoles

?? I guess the NEC doesent apply here... (#10 awg 35 amps at 75 F)

Not really on topic but just noted that.
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K2YO
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« Reply #8 on: March 08, 2011, 01:16:23 PM »

Tom,

You'd have to ask Anderson. They are the ones that call their connector that will accept a 10 guage wire a 45.
http://www.andersonpower.com/files.php?file=ASM-PP_1S1072(3).pdf

Bernie
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K1CJS
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« Reply #9 on: March 09, 2011, 04:41:25 AM »

.....has anybody else had trouble with fitting the stupid 45 amp Anderson power pole dealie into the plastic housing?  The thing barely fits and add any solder or crimping and the X#@!* will NOT go in and click.  Grr.  Any tips or tricks to this?  I am using AGW 10 wire.....

I'm hardly a master at it, but there are a couple of pointers I can offer.  First, use very little solder if you insist on soldering them.  Just enough to 'wet' the joint and no more.  After all, they're not meant to be soldered.  Second, as KG4RUL pointed out, make sure the crimp is no wider than the contact blade. 

Lastly--and this is the one that I've found is the problem more often than not--make sure the crimping did not bow the contact.  The bottom edge of the contact should be staright from just behind the retainer lip right to the end where the wire is attached.  If it is bowed--either way, you'll have a very hard time installing it in the housing. 

I had tried several times to get one particularly stubborn contact into the shell, and took the time to examine the contact next to a fresh contact that hadn't seen the crimper I use.  I found that the crimped contact was bowed, and once I straightened it out, it went into the housing with very little difficulty.

Good luck, and 73.  Chris, K1CJS
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KG6MZS
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Posts: 476




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« Reply #10 on: March 09, 2011, 06:10:26 AM »

.....has anybody else had trouble with fitting the stupid 45 amp Anderson power pole dealie into the plastic housing?  The thing barely fits and add any solder or crimping and the X#@!* will NOT go in and click.  Grr.  Any tips or tricks to this?  I am using AGW 10 wire.....

I'm hardly a master at it, but there are a couple of pointers I can offer.  First, use very little solder if you insist on soldering them.  Just enough to 'wet' the joint and no more.  After all, they're not meant to be soldered.  Second, as KG4RUL pointed out, make sure the crimp is no wider than the contact blade. 

Lastly--and this is the one that I've found is the problem more often than not--make sure the crimping did not bow the contact.  The bottom edge of the contact should be staright from just behind the retainer lip right to the end where the wire is attached.  If it is bowed--either way, you'll have a very hard time installing it in the housing. 

I had tried several times to get one particularly stubborn contact into the shell, and took the time to examine the contact next to a fresh contact that hadn't seen the crimper I use.  I found that the crimped contact was bowed, and once I straightened it out, it went into the housing with very little difficulty.

Good luck, and 73.  Chris, K1CJS

Thanks Chris.  This really helped.  Between getting a dedicated (read expensive) crimper and your tips, even I managed to get a good connector.

Thank you everybody for the help.

73 de Eric, KG6MZS
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KE4JOY
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« Reply #11 on: March 09, 2011, 06:32:23 AM »

Quote
?? I guess the NEC doesent apply here... (#10 awg 35 amps at 75 F)

The NEC is considering long runs (30, 40, 50+ feet) in conduit in building construction and, as you noted, factoring in the temperature rise under those conditions.  In ham applications to connect rigs, for example, if your wires reach 75 degrees C in open air, you've got bigger problems than the connectors not fitting the housing.  The voltage drop (lost as heat) is MUCH smaller at 12 volts  and a typical maximum length of 15 to 20 feet (due to lower wire series resistance) than in a 100 or 200 foot run in building construction.  So, you are correct that NEC guidelines are not generally relevant to a low voltage communications installation.  The main issue that the ham should consider is the voltage drop as relates to the input voltage to the equipment (usually a maximum of 10%).  If that is acceptable, the wire heating will automatically fall within safe spec.  Of course, it is still prudent to insure that your power supply has overcurrent protection (ie. fuses, circuit breakers, power supply current limiting, etc.) to insure that your installation is protected.
Tom DGN


The temprature rating of the wire is to coordinate with the temprature rating of the overcurrent device it is connected to. Most smaller breakers have 75 F degree rating lugs and will trip out at that temprature (not to exceede) 90 degree rated breakers are available and in that case #10 is good for 40 amperes. But .. this is totally off the topic so meh... nevermind.
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K8AXW
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« Reply #12 on: March 09, 2011, 09:18:33 AM »

Whatever crimp tool you use make sure the connector fits into the tool.  If the tool jaw recess is too big or too small, it will form "wings" on the connector and chances are it won't go into the plastic retainer.

If you use a tool that has a half-moon recess in one jaw and a punch in the opposing jaw make sure the connector is put into the half-moon recess with the connector split on the bottom.

If the punch side comes against the connector split it will split the connector open creating wings and again it will not fit the plastic retainer plus you will have a very poor connection between the wire and connector.  It will fail with use.
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AI8P
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Posts: 118




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« Reply #13 on: March 09, 2011, 09:37:21 AM »

Hi.

I have had instances of thick insulation where I had to thin the insulation a little in order for it to fit it.

Your mileage may vary!

Dennis
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K5LXP
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« Reply #14 on: March 09, 2011, 07:39:15 PM »

> ?? I guess the NEC doesent apply here... (#10 awg 35 amps at 75 F)

I suspect they are rating the terminal by itself, not the (user supplied) wiring.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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