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Author Topic: copying at a slower speed  (Read 4769 times)
K9ZMD
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Posts: 170




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« Reply #15 on: March 22, 2011, 01:16:50 PM »

. . . separate from collegial rag-chews but not sinking to the current-gen text-kiddy trend, where would the case be for brevity in certain circumstances as applied to CW?
Thanks.
The common morse abbreviations speed communication, but unfamiliar abbreviations absolutely kill head copy for me (so a pox on text-speak).  Here are some examples of prosigns and common CW abbreviations: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prosigns_for_Morse_code  
You can probably google up a few more pages of examples, too.  73

K9ZMD
« Last Edit: March 25, 2011, 04:56:26 PM by K9ZMD » Logged
VE4EGL
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Posts: 23




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« Reply #16 on: March 22, 2011, 01:52:58 PM »

Correct spelling & grammar in our language is a pleasure. However, separate from collegial rag-chews but not sinking to the current-gen text-kiddy trend, where would the case be for brevity in certain circumstances as applied to CW?

From what I've seen and heard, sometimes people spell things phonetically and/or just drop vowels like crazy.  For example, sometimes "good" becomes "gud" to save a few dahs.  I also copied "srsly" once or twice while practicing receiving.  It seems vowel-dropping is the most common practice to shrink words though, as it's easier to fill in the blanks.
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I used to think you needed an elaborate setup to work DX, then I made a QSO 3,000 miles away using a dipole 8ft off the ground in the middle of a forest.
KM3K
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Posts: 299




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« Reply #17 on: March 22, 2011, 06:51:17 PM »

Correct spelling & grammar in our language is a pleasure. However, separate from collegial rag-chews but not sinking to the current-gen text-kiddy trend, where would the case be for brevity in certain circumstances as applied to CW?

From what I've seen and heard, sometimes people spell things phonetically and/or just drop vowels like crazy.  For example, sometimes "good" becomes "gud" to save a few dahs.  I also copied "srsly" once or twice while practicing receiving.  It seems vowel-dropping is the most common practice to shrink words though, as it's easier to fill in the blanks.
Hmmm.... if I'm to expect that on the air, I think that'll be too much for my slow brain to process.
The current goal here is to do 25 wpm and, so far, that seems doable in the G4FON program.
So, although I may be able eventually to copy ARRL at 25 wpm, actual on-the-air at 25 wpm seems to be unlikely because I cannot think that fast to fill-in blanks and still copy what is coming down the pipe.
Time will tell what is going to happen.
Thanks, though for the heads-up.
73 Jerry KM3K
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NA7U
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Posts: 72


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« Reply #18 on: March 25, 2011, 08:00:56 AM »

Correct spelling & grammar in our language is a pleasure. However, separate from collegial rag-chews but not sinking to the current-gen text-kiddy trend, where would the case be for brevity in certain circumstances as applied to CW?

From what I've seen and heard, sometimes people spell things phonetically and/or just drop vowels like crazy.  For example, sometimes "good" becomes "gud" to save a few dahs.  I also copied "srsly" once or twice while practicing receiving.  It seems vowel-dropping is the most common practice to shrink words though, as it's easier to fill in the blanks.
Hmmm.... if I'm to expect that on the air, I think that'll be too much for my slow brain to process.
The current goal here is to do 25 wpm and, so far, that seems doable in the G4FON program.
So, although I may be able eventually to copy ARRL at 25 wpm, actual on-the-air at 25 wpm seems to be unlikely because I cannot think that fast to fill-in blanks and still copy what is coming down the pipe.
Time will tell what is going to happen.
Thanks, though for the heads-up.
73 Jerry KM3K

Jerry,

The code is not about thinking, it has to be reflex, basically just like spoken language. Abbreviations have been a part of the code since the beginning and most of them are common across QSOs. Stuff like "srsly" though sounds like it is bleed-over from phone text messaging.

Relax, keep working at it every day and it'll come to you. If you find you are plateauing at a certain speed then try changing learning methods. Definitely get on the air, that is the best way to learn once you have a basic command of the code.
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20595




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« Reply #19 on: March 25, 2011, 09:36:27 AM »

When someone can tell the difference between computer sent code and my fist with a paddle, I'll pack it in. Wink
Sorry Steve, I know what you meant, but it didn't come out quite right.  

When I hear perfect code in complete sentences, with good spelling (even the large words), all punctuation like commas & periods, and no prosigns at all, then I know three things immediately.  One, that is not Steve on a paddle.  Two, that is some weenie on a keyboard who won't be able to copy what I send to him at exactly that same speed.  Three . . . complete sentences with correct spelling and grammar?  Man, that is definitely not the average ham who posts on these forums.  Grin

Gary, K9ZMD/7
Battle Ground, WA (Soon to be Ridgefield, WA, in my own house with a real antenna!)

I think I make very few spelling mistakes on CW; however I almost never spell out all the words, and use lots of abbreviations, including some I make up on the fly so you wouldn't know if those are spelled right or not. Tongue

If I make a sending mistake I usually follow it by .. .. (like I I) as opposed to eight dits, and I almost never use any punctuation unless it's really necessary.  So you're right, I probably don't sound much like a keyboard. Cheesy

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K9ZMD
Member

Posts: 170




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« Reply #20 on: March 25, 2011, 05:59:21 PM »

Hmmm.... if I'm to expect that on the air, I think that'll be too much for my slow brain to process.
The current goal here is to do 25 wpm and, so far, that seems doable in the G4FON program.
So, although I may be able eventually to copy ARRL at 25 wpm, actual on-the-air at 25 wpm seems to be unlikely because I cannot think that fast to fill-in blanks and still copy what is coming down the pipe.
Time will tell what is going to happen.
Thanks, though for the heads-up.
73 Jerry KM3K
Jerry,

Head copy at speed isn't about hearing characters . . . you will actually hear the whole word and recognize it, just as if someone spoke it to you.  Dollars to donuts, you can already do that with certain words.  As a Novice (1960), I was surprised when some common words (like "the", "name", "wx", and "pwr") began jumping out at me . . . even at rates so fast that I couldn't identify individual characters.

Now, as an OF, I'm pushing my speed upward by listening to G4FON while I surf the net (with head phones, of course, to avoid driving family members nuts).  I start each session at 50 wpm with 5-10 minutes from my file "100 most common words".  Copying much?  Heck no, it is like sipping from a fire hose, but does acclimate my ears to the sound.  Lately, there are a few words that jump out at me every time they play at that speed; week by week, there will be even more of them. 

Continuing with my surfing, I drop the speed by 5 wpm every 10 minutes.  Understand now, I am mostly not even trying to copy the words.  Instead, I am just letting it play.  I have several files that I use: similar sounding words, common news article words, common QSO words, etc.  When I started this method, my comfort (solid copy) speed was under 20 wpm, so I started sessions at 40 wpm.  Gradually, my comfort speed rose to 25 wpm, and it soon will be 30 wpm if I keep it up.  I anticipate bumping the fire hose speed to 55 wpm, soon.

So what's it like?  I sit here reading email & news on the computer with this beeping constantly in my ears.  As I reduce the speed toward my comfort level, I began to hear some of the words just as if someone else in the room was speaking to me.  If I focus on the screen, I tune out the code  - just like I tune out the XYL sometimes Smiley - but some words still get through.  I don't sweat the ones I don't hear.  Then, if I focus on the code, I immediately began to hear more & more of the words.  At comfort speed, I'm consciously recognizing every single word, just about the same as in a spoken conversation.  The practice I do at that speed is with whole sentences, not just words.  It is easy to make text files from news stories and play them in the G4FON program.  73 & see you on the air.

Gary, K9ZMD
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KM3K
Member

Posts: 299




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« Reply #21 on: March 25, 2011, 07:21:45 PM »

I sit here reading email & news on the computer with this beeping constantly in my ears.

Gary K9ZMD,
I was pleased to read your posting because, two days ago, I started doing what you have done albeit at only 25 wpm.
After all, I certainly spend at least 30 minutes in the morning and evening reading emails and surfing.
That can be a lot of practice time.
I did juice up the speed a couple times to 30 (I could pick out some letters) and would drop down to 15 wpm (seemed like slow motion).
I was not sure if that technique was going to be effective but you've changed that.
73 Jerry KM3K
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