Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Questions about Canadian Licensing  (Read 7260 times)
VA2FSQ
Member

Posts: 510




Ignore
« on: March 14, 2011, 05:40:14 PM »

Hi,
I'm currently studying to get my license and I will head over to an industry canada office sometime soon.  A question I have is once I pass the test, am I informed immediately?  Or do I get a letter?  I'm shooting for the Basic with honors.  How soon after can I try if I don't hit the 80% mark?
How accurate are the practice tests?  I can usually hit 83-88% during the tests.
Also, once I am informed, do I then apply for the call signs?  How long does it take?

Thanks!
Logged

VA2FSQ
VE4EGL
Member

Posts: 23




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2011, 07:13:17 PM »

I did my exam with a local volunteer examiner so the answer to your first question might be different than what I tell you.  The test is marked on the spot so you're informed immediately.  You could write the basic exam six times in a row if you want, you're really just limited by your time and possibly finances.

I used Exhaminer to study and was shocked to discover the questions are actually in the public domain.  I didn't know I had been studying the questions verbatim until about halfway through the exam.  I kept doing practice exams until I consistently scored in the 90s and passed with 96% as a result.  Of course, I could almost recite all 950 some odd questions at that point.  I highly recommend picking up the study guide on the RAC website though, there's a huge difference between studying for the test and studying for practical experience.

Fill out your application as much as possible and have it with you when you write the test.  Then, when you pass, just hand it over and let the examiner do what they need to.  You'll know which call sign you got within two weeks at most.  If you haven't already, go to http://www.callsign.ca and skim through the list to see if your choices are available.  That way, you don't spend time trying to get a call sign that's already been assigned.

Lastly, have fun.  Remember that the basic exam is just enough to prove you know the rules and how not to get yourself killed.  Wink
Logged

I used to think you needed an elaborate setup to work DX, then I made a QSO 3,000 miles away using a dipole 8ft off the ground in the middle of a forest.
VA2FSQ
Member

Posts: 510




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2011, 06:59:53 AM »

Thanks for the info!  Maybe I will search out a local volunteer instead of industry canada. I too am using Exhaminer.  I figure I should be ready in a month or two.  I'm currently building an unbuilt heathkit hw-101 and it should be ready right around this time and the ground should be thawed enough for my ground rods.
Logged

VA2FSQ
W3LK
Member

Posts: 5644




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2011, 08:17:17 AM »

Good Luck, both on the exam and building the HW-101.

A previously un-assembled kit? Nice find!

73,

Lon - W3LK
Naugatuck, Connecticut
Logged

A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
VE4EGL
Member

Posts: 23




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2011, 08:51:25 AM »

Happy to help, it's a fun hobby.

It sounds like you should study Basic and Advanced in tandem so you can get both at once.   Grin
Logged

I used to think you needed an elaborate setup to work DX, then I made a QSO 3,000 miles away using a dipole 8ft off the ground in the middle of a forest.
VA2FSQ
Member

Posts: 510




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2011, 07:26:37 PM »

I would study the advanced, but I haven't seen any books on it.  Are there any other than studying the arrl yearbook (yikes!!).
Good Luck, both on the exam and building the HW-101.

A previously un-assembled kit? Nice find!

73,

Lon - W3LK
Naugatuck, Connecticut


It included the power supply too (unbuilt too!)> It has all new resistors and electrolytic caps, and two brand new jackson drives.  The power supply is finished and tested.  This was a dream from when i was a teen but could never afford one.  It's never too late and I decided to go for it.  I really think all of the people that never had the experience of building their rig missed out on one of the finer points of amateur radio.
Logged

VA2FSQ
VE4EGL
Member

Posts: 23




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: March 16, 2011, 07:34:31 AM »

The RAC store has an advanced study guide on CD for sale but personally, I think Exhaminer and some electronics books from your local library are more than enough to pick it up.

The focus in the basic exam is mainly on rules, regulations and safety to weed out the people who aren't serious and/or might hurt themselves or others while the advanced exam is mainly a pile of math (calculating Q, inductance, capacitance, etc.), more advanced electronics (argh, I hate transistors) and antenna theory (how I learned to stop worrying and start loving the dipole) for those who want to build their own transmitters, crank the power or run a crossband repeater.
Logged

I used to think you needed an elaborate setup to work DX, then I made a QSO 3,000 miles away using a dipole 8ft off the ground in the middle of a forest.
N3DF
Member

Posts: 252




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: March 16, 2011, 09:39:39 AM »

I had a Heath HW 101 forty years ago and greatly enjoyed using it.  I made thousands of QSOs and had a lot of fun.  However, by building an unbuilt kit you greatly reduced the value of yours.  You could have traded the unbuilt kit for a decades more modern, reliable and capable radio. 
Logged

Neil N3DF
W3LK
Member

Posts: 5644




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: March 16, 2011, 10:20:12 AM »

I had a Heath HW 101 forty years ago and greatly enjoyed using it.  I made thousands of QSOs and had a lot of fun.  However, by building an unbuilt kit you greatly reduced the value of yours.  You could have traded the unbuilt kit for a decades more modern, reliable and capable radio. 

I'd much rather have a functioning radio, making contacts around the world, than a collection of parts in a box that are otherwise useless.
Logged

A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
W3HF
Member

Posts: 688


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #9 on: March 16, 2011, 12:54:42 PM »

I had a Heath HW 101 forty years ago and greatly enjoyed using it.  I made thousands of QSOs and had a lot of fun.  However, by building an unbuilt kit you greatly reduced the value of yours.  You could have traded the unbuilt kit for a decades more modern, reliable and capable radio. 

I'd much rather have a functioning radio, making contacts around the world, than a collection of parts in a box that are otherwise useless.
Agreed. But that's not the perspective of the Heathkit collecting community, who likely would have paid top dollar for the unbuilt kits.

The point is that although the original poster will have the enjoyment of building the kit, he'll still end up with (effectively) a forty-year-old radio. Some of the parts may be new, but the design is 40 years old and the capabilities/performance is the same.

In return for giving up the fun of building the Heathkit, he could have sold the unbuilt kits to a collector and bought a new design, with WARC bands and better performance. And that could have been either a new factory-made radio, or a new-design kit like an Elecraft K2/100.
Logged
W3LK
Member

Posts: 5644




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: March 16, 2011, 02:38:05 PM »


Agreed. But that's not the perspective of the Heathkit collecting community, who likely would have paid top dollar for the unbuilt kits.

The point is that although the original poster will have the enjoyment of building the kit, he'll still end up with (effectively) a forty-year-old radio. Some of the parts may be new, but the design is 40 years old and the capabilities/performance is the same.

In return for giving up the fun of building the Heathkit, he could have sold the unbuilt kits to a collector and bought a new design, with WARC bands and better performance. And that could have been either a new factory-made radio, or a new-design kit like an Elecraft K2/100.

That is true, but he decided to go a different way, didn't he?  His choice. Smiley

I have a KWM-2A/30L-1 combo that are worth probably three times what I paid for them, but I prefer to keep them and operate them, rather than sell them for a profit and spend the money on something newer. BTW, they were both built in 1966. No, they are not my only rigs, but if they were, I would be not feel short-changed or cheated because they are old. I wish I had kept the Heath RX-1 (Mohawk) that I built as a novice instead of selling it while I was away from amateur radio. I'd love to have another and the matching Apache TX-1 as the basis of an AM station.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2011, 02:44:56 PM by W3LK » Logged

A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
VA2FSQ
Member

Posts: 510




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: March 17, 2011, 08:34:00 AM »

Yes, it could have been good for a collector, but none of them bid on it! It was on ebay and went for alot less than the ones in the past. Nonetheless, I bought it to build it, not to sell it later.  I'm sure the newer rigs are much more capable and maybe one day I'll get one.  Its a bit of nostalgia, a learning experience and something I drooled over as a teen.
Logged

VA2FSQ
W3LK
Member

Posts: 5644




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: March 17, 2011, 01:10:47 PM »

Yes, it could have been good for a collector, but none of them bid on it! It was on ebay and went for alot less than the ones in the past. Nonetheless, I bought it to build it, not to sell it later.  I'm sure the newer rigs are much more capable and maybe one day I'll get one.  Its a bit of nostalgia, a learning experience and something I drooled over as a teen.

I think you made a good decision.
Logged

A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
KB1SF
Member

Posts: 411


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #13 on: March 30, 2011, 04:39:06 AM »

Hi,
I'm currently studying to get my license and I will head over to an industry canada office sometime soon.  A question I have is once I pass the test, am I informed immediately?  Or do I get a letter?  I'm shooting for the Basic with honors.  How soon after can I try if I don't hit the 80% mark?
How accurate are the practice tests?  I can usually hit 83-88% during the tests.
Also, once I am informed, do I then apply for the call signs?  How long does it take?

Thanks!

I would refrain from "heading over to Industry Canada" to take the test. 

Canada uses a team of accredited examiners almost exclusively to administer its exams.  Suggest you check out the lengthy discussion on Canadian exams and licensing I've posted on our local Canadian club website at:  www.ve3sar.org.  Click on the "Canada Licensing" link off the main page.

Depending on how soon your examiner faxes your results to Industry Canada, my experience (as an Accredited Examiner myself) is that your new Canadian call sign will usually show up in the official database within a few days...sometimes overnight.  In any case, it's a LOT quicker than the States.

And there is no waiting period for you to take the test again if you don't hit the 80% mark...or the 70% mark for that matter.  Those decisions are left up to you and your examiner.

Hope this helps.

73,

Keith
KB1SF /  VA3KSF
Logged
VA2FSQ
Member

Posts: 510




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: March 31, 2011, 06:00:54 PM »

Well, I took the test today with a local examiner and  I made the honors I have my license!!
I made the honors easily so, a few weeks from now when the antenna is up and the hw101 is finished I will hit the air!
Logged

VA2FSQ
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!