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Author Topic: New thing heard during the MN QSO party  (Read 792 times)
KC0SHZ
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Posts: 372




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« on: February 03, 2008, 02:06:56 PM »

I was trying to get a QSO with Minnesota for WAS.  During the QSO party, I heard several Minn stations collaborating with each other to get contacts on 80 meters.

I ended up with 5 QSO's, and for my purposes, this was great.

Is this a common thing?  If so, is there some way to get the tip off on where these groups are working during other state QSO parties?
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KI9A
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« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2008, 07:13:01 PM »

Find the MNQP webpage, that should tell you "suggested" frequencies.

If you hear a MN station on another band, just tell him you need him on 80, and see if he will move there for you. MN will be simple for you to get on 80 anyway.

Good luck, and hang in there!

73-Chuck KI9A
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KC0SHZ
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« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2008, 08:15:46 PM »

Yeah, I know about the webpage, that is how I found out about the QSO party.

What I was asking about was the multi-op multi-county collaboration in the target state that allows a caller to get several contacts in the state in rapid sequence all on one frequency.

Is THIS practice common?  If so, how does one find out where these collaboratives are working?
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K8GU
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« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2008, 07:42:55 AM »

What you describe is not very common.  

Like Chuck says, it is common for stations to move each other from band to band or mode to mode.  Sometimes a mobile station will tell the last person (s)he worked to QRX for a moment when they cross a county line and then work them again.
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N0UY
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« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2008, 10:25:39 AM »

Well I'm from Minnesota and I heard a little of this on 80 meter ssb.  I was surprised to work one station and then be asked to work another one waiting in the weeds.  I guess it was fine but uncommon for me also.  I tried to work most of the time on CW since I don't have any filters for ssb operation.

ray
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KB9CRY
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« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2008, 06:04:50 PM »

What I was asking about was the multi-op multi-county collaboration in the target state that allows a caller to get several contacts in the state in rapid sequence all on one frequency.

Yes this is very common.  Of course, we here in Illinois talk to each other prior to the IL QSO Party and pre-arrange meeting times/freqs where we can max each other out.  You just got in with the action.
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N3QE
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« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2008, 09:03:30 AM »

Well, I personally don't really think of a state QSO party as being a "contest" per se.

It is a good opportunity to work that state, counties in that state, etc. And IMHO that's what a state QSO party is for. Anything that can be done to encourage activity from that state over the duration of the QSO party (and before/after too!) is great.

The Minnesota QSO party this past weekend was REMARKABLY well organized and on the ball. I heard activity from Minnesota on multiple frequencies/bands/modes pretty much all the time (except the interruption of the sprint).

I contrast this with the supposed VT and DE QSO parties the same weekend, where I heard zilch coming out of those states. Literally zero. I heard other stations calling CQ VT and CQ DE but nobody ever came back and no QSO's resulted.
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KC0SHZ
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« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2008, 12:29:30 PM »

"I contrast this with the supposed VT and DE QSO parties the same weekend, where I heard zilch coming out of those states. Literally zero. I heard other stations calling CQ VT and CQ DE but nobody ever came back and no QSO's resulted."

I did hear a couple of stations from Delaware calling CQ on Sunday afternoon on 20 meters.  I was not on 20 meters very long on Saturday, so I can't comment about that afternoon.

I thought that the coordination of stations was a good idea.  As a new guy, I didn't know if that was a common practice or not (I had never run across it before) and if it was, how do I go about finding it again in other QSO parties?

Sounds like a tactic that I might want to use this coming April for the Nebraska QSO party.

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K9NW
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« Reply #8 on: February 06, 2008, 04:15:37 PM »

This isn't a common practice though you will run across it from time to time.  But it's not like that's the only place you will find QSOs.  Your best bet to find QSOs from your target state is still to call CQ.  Persistently!
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