Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: How quick did you learn CW? I've amazed myself!!  (Read 6936 times)
AE5QB
Member

Posts: 269




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: March 26, 2011, 08:28:33 PM »

I don't use the microphone much.  Mostly for the weekly club repeater net and occasionally a SSB QSO, but not often.  I work pretty much CW, just not enough of it.  I listen to the code CD on my way to and from work each day and try to at least listen some in the evenings between eating and bed.  But I am not getting as much on air time as I should to get good fast.  But that is OK, it is a hobby and not my life.  I am not complaining and I am OK with where I am at.  Do I wish I could head copy 25 WPM?  Sure!  But then if I could I would have to start working on some other aspect of the hobby. I do this for the joy of learning and growing, not for the finish line. But I am just jealous, or maybe just in awe, of the folks who can pick up Morse Code or any other new language in short order.  Good CW everyone!
Logged
K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2802




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: March 26, 2011, 09:08:39 PM »

Simon - just out of curiosity, which hotel do you manage?
Logged

73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
HS0ZIB
Member

Posts: 418




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: March 26, 2011, 10:42:52 PM »

Pat, I own 2 hotels, one on Phuket Island and one across the bay on the mainland at Ao Nang. The Phuket QTH is definitely the better one for my radio hobby since Ao Nang has a lot of limestone 'karks' which tower all around.

The Phuket QTH is right next to the international airport. It is actually the airport hotel for transit passengers, and is located adjacent to the airport land.  It's about 500 meters from the Indian Ocean/Andaman sea.

Although i've owned this hotel for the past 5 years, I have always been too busy to 'seriously' involve myself in my hobbies.  Now I have a new business partner and have more time to relax.  So I intend to build a nice radio shack with decent antennas over the next few months.

I have also acquired an Appalachian Sprint III QRP CW rig, so I plan on doing some /P operation from both Phuket and some of the other islands - hence my reason to learn CW.  IOTA AS-053 is not a rare location, but it is in reasonable demand, as is top band from HS0.

I am up in Bangkok for a few days next week, but will return to Phuket and start designing my new shack!

Thailand is a very nice location to enjoy amateur radio.  Although there are still a number of restrictions on import of rigs and use of certain bands (6 meters, 70 cm etc), these disadvantages are compensated for by the relaxing lifestyle, good food and - above all - good weather!

Simon
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20595




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: March 27, 2011, 01:37:02 PM »

Simon, if you are still reading here, I'd be curious to know about the amateur radio operator population in Thailand. 

Some resources say it's absolutely HUGE (like a very large percentage of the overall population have licenses, much higher percentage than the U.S. or many other places), but the radio club only shows a fairly small number.

Are there really a huge number of hams in Thailand?  If so, do most of them have only VHF-UHF privileges, and that's why we don't hear them over here?

I work Thailand hams fairly often (since I'm in Los Angeles, which is closer than most of the U.S. would be to you) but I don't hear Thai hams packing the bands like some published statistics would indicate.

My XYL and I might visit Phuket next year during our normal pilgimage to the Philippines (she's from Cebu City). I've never been there, but my XYL has and says it's very nice.  I'm looking forward to it!  If we get there, I'll look you up for sure.
Logged
K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2802




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: March 27, 2011, 09:14:55 PM »

Simon -

I was in Thailand for a week in late June/early July 1993.  One of the USN's Aircraft Carriers picked me and a crew of surveyors up in Singapore and dropped us off a week later at Pattaya.  We caught a nice Navy van ride up to Bangkok where we had a nice hotel waiting for us - the Royal Orchid Sheraton.  We had no choice; our travel folks had made the reservations and we were stuck.

No complaints, though!  At the time the dollar/baht exchange rate was favorable (for me), and a tuk-tuk ride to anywhere was fun and inexpensive.  I really enjoyed that trip.

(As a sidelight, on July 4th, the day before we left, all the streets were lined with gold and purple.  We thought that Thailand was celebrating U.S. Independence Day!  As it turned out, that happens to be Crown Princess Chulabhorn's birthday as well as that of the USA!).
Logged

73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
HS0ZIB
Member

Posts: 418




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: March 29, 2011, 06:28:48 AM »

Yes, the local amateur radio population is quite high, but this is on 2 meters only, (70cm is only authorised for reception, so just listening in on non-Thai stations). 2 meters is full of 'CB' chat, and I rarely hear callsigns.  All traffic is in Thai language only, which makes sense since the foreign ham population is very small.  I have heard that if a foreign ham speaks English on 2 meters, then he will be jammed, since most users will either think he is a pirate station, or simply do not understand that non-Thais can get ham licences!

I speak Thai and have chatted a little on 2 meters, but do not really find it at all interesting, just like CB.

There are not many HF Thai amateurs for a couple of reasons.  The cost of buying HF equipment is out of reach for the average Thai person.  Additionally, due to the stringent import rules, only a very restricted range of HF rig models can be imported, (nothing with 6 meter coverage for example).  Finally, the licencing authority (the NTC) has been the subject of internal politics/political 'football' for many years, and so getting a ham licence is not so easy.

For foreign hams, you need to live in Thailand to qualify for a licence, (so visiting hams cannot get a temporary licence...).  Then there has to be a reciprocal agreement with your own country, (and only a few countries including the UK and USA fall into this category).  If there is no reciprocal agreement, then you can only get a Thai ham licence by taking the tests in written Thai!!

Simon
Logged
M0AUW
Member

Posts: 2




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: March 31, 2011, 08:10:13 AM »

Well done Simon;
I have recently got back in to CW but always been stuck at around 15wpm. I'm determined this time to get up to 18/20wpm but it’s taken me 3 months and been a struggle.

Problems I come across include:
Unconsciously reading what you have just written down - fatal!
Doing too many simple QSO's which become repetitive so you then find yourself starting to get ahead of yourself in reading the code - patience required! ....(I’ve found a way round this, chatting with any American station, simply because they do not stick to a standard reply or message and they try to have a normal conversation. Many Europeans stick to a set routine).
I find I have good days and bad days, sometimes I  cannot translate anything except the simplest of code. Other days I’m brilliant and happily chat away......Give yourself a break now and then and suddenly it all becomes clearer!

But as I said I am determined this time, so I'll just keep quietlytapping away and I'm sure it will all fit in to place soon!
Keep up the good work
73s Dick
M0AUW
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!