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Author Topic: Is ham radio aging or not ??  (Read 6863 times)
N7DM
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Posts: 671




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« Reply #15 on: April 16, 2011, 03:08:11 PM »

Technically....... of course.  My 'old' Corsair(s) are vastly superior to the Ranger, et. al.  On the other hand...those nights of long ago...flickering M/Vs... on the air late to avoid The Real OM's TVI wrath.  Memories. If the 170 isn't taking up too much space, hang on to it. I don't know/remember the EICO. A couple 'cycles ago I was snooping around the upper end of Ten and heard the most beautiful sounds: AM. I realized I had nothing that would work. I even unbalanced the Bal/Mod in a Corsair to make 'cheat' AM. Sounded lousy. Does the EICO work Ancient Modulation? If so there is GREAT demand for it... if/when Ten opens well.
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K7PEH
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« Reply #16 on: April 16, 2011, 04:51:11 PM »

The EICO 720 was a CW rig.  It had an modulator for AM that you could buy but I never used it for anything but CW during my Novice days in the mid-1960s.  My Novice station is highlighted in the two photos at the following URL: http://www.k7peh.com/NoviceRig.html.

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N2EY
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« Reply #17 on: April 16, 2011, 05:23:30 PM »

I'd love to see a flickering set of 866 M/V rectifiers as I sent code.

I see that every time I'm on the air. Had to homebrew the rig to do it, though.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N7DM
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« Reply #18 on: April 16, 2011, 08:12:36 PM »

HI......... whaddya power with 'em, Jim ?  [Make my day, say "Pair of 813's"]

PEH:  My first 'phone rig' was a 6L6 final with a telephone handset F-1 carbon mike soldered in the cathode lead........
« Last Edit: April 16, 2011, 08:14:57 PM by N7DM » Logged
K7PEH
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« Reply #19 on: April 16, 2011, 09:15:13 PM »

When I home brewed my dual 811 linear back 46 years ago I first used 866 mercury vapor rectifiers for the power supply and I really did like that purple glow.  But, when I was in college I got bored one weekend replaced the 866 tubes with solid state diodes in a full-wave bridge.  No, they did not glow but they took up a lot less room.  Of course, that extra room didn't mean anything since I designed the power supply for the 866s in the first place.
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N2EY
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« Reply #20 on: April 17, 2011, 03:28:30 AM »

HI......... whaddya power with 'em, Jim ?

Pair of 807s. Sure, they can do a lot more, but 866s are common while 816s are rare.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N7DM
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« Reply #21 on: April 17, 2011, 06:18:27 AM »

Well, any way you cut it, *WE* lived the Glory Years of Ham Radio...... which....... [I think].... addresses the title of this thread!

VY 73

dm
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AD4U
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« Reply #22 on: April 20, 2011, 10:10:31 AM »

I think ham radio in general is an old timers hobby.

Case in point.....Way back in the early 1970's our radio club decided to participate in our first field day.  Some of us young "whipper snappers" spearheaded the event.  Bud KD4II, George WB4TGK, Carl WA4DFP, and I (WB4QZT back then) put the antennas and the station together.  We had a great weekend.

It is now year 2011 and the above-mentioned hams are still the young "whipper snappers" in our club and we are all in our mid 60s'.

Dick  AD4U
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N7DM
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« Reply #23 on: April 20, 2011, 11:17:17 AM »

Ain't it the truth, OM

I turned 15 a month before my first F/D.  Have loved it ever since. The ONLY Ham Event where The Faithful can gather together, around Our Hobby. I have operated 1E or 1B from my QTH for a long time, as 'the kids' in the local club seem to have no drive, curiosity, or competitive spirit. To them F/D is [another] picnic, with some 'tripping hazzards'.  I am looking forward to what the XYL calls The June Madness, and have invited a number of guys to come on up, tie up their R/V and have some fun. My standard challenge is: I operate A1, they can operate anything they want. Sunday, 1100, we count QSO's, period. Low count buys Sunday Dinner for the gang. To date NOT ONE taker......

I'll be looking for AD4U...40 thru 10... on The Music Mode

dm
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WA8JXM
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« Reply #24 on: April 27, 2011, 10:40:10 AM »

Some years back I was active on HF CW.   Everyone I worked was older than me, and I was in my mid 50s at the time!   Mostly old military and railroad ops, often in their 70s and 80s.    Fifty years ago, there were less people making it to 70 and 80!

When I got my ticket, there were many teens getting their licenses (I got mine at 16).   How many teens today are into ham radio?  Back then radio communications was hot technology.   Today?

Ken
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K3ZL
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Posts: 125




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« Reply #25 on: April 27, 2011, 06:19:47 PM »

I got my license at age 13.  There were lots of young kids on the novice bands back then, and as was stated above, lots of old guys that could make a bug sing.  Now I am an old guy, still on CW, and work lots of old guys like me.
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N2EY
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« Reply #26 on: April 28, 2011, 03:18:22 AM »

I got my license at 13, too. Doesn't seem like 44 years ago, but it was.

Back then there were some teenagers in ham radio, but there were also lots of older folks. I remember the teenagers most because because they were my peers and we had the most in common.

In those days the Novice bands were busy because they were few and narrow, and because the Novice license was short-term and nonrenewable. Every Novice I knew back then had a receiver and antenna before they got the license, and added a transmitter while waiting for the license to arrive after passing the test. They didn't get the license and then set about getting on the air; time was too short for that.

Back then, most new hams came to amateur radio by way of HF and CW, using very basic equipment. Many beginners homebrewed, converted surplus, or built kits for their first station. This gave a newcomer an instinctive feel for how radio works, what makes one receiver better than another, etc. Nothing was automated and you could easily blow something up by mistuning or inattention.

There are still plenty of teenage hams; they're just not as visible to us older folks. The time demands on them often preclude their attendance at hamfests and club meetings, for example.

There's also the fact that the teen years are few and they pass quickly. From 13 to 19 is only 7 years, but from 50 to 89 is 40 years.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N7DM
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« Reply #27 on: April 28, 2011, 04:44:50 PM »

I think maybe the secret was how CHEAP it was [if you were anywhere near a WW2 surplus barn]. Mountains of '12 volt' surplus tubes. I think a 1625 was a 12 volt 807... all you needed to light them up was a typical power supply transformer, put the 6.3 VAC and 5.0 VAC [for rectifiers] in series for filament power. [close enough for Ham Work].  I learned about the problems of excessive parallel plate resistances when I made an amplifier of a half dozen of those 1625's in a single ended final!  But........ LORD... it was fun!

As I recall, some adult found out that the control grid in 304TL's was platinum; all of a sudden THEY were gone!  Two bits a piece, but GONE!  Lousy amps anyway, Mu of "4"... took a couple hundred watts to drive a pair to a KW. Not a 'California Gallon' either!
« Last Edit: April 28, 2011, 04:57:23 PM by N7DM » Logged
K3ZL
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Posts: 125




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« Reply #28 on: April 28, 2011, 07:21:51 PM »

[if you were anywhere near a WW2 surplus barn].

Do you remember Fair Radio Sales in Lima, Ohio?  I ordered a brand new BC229 receiver from them.  It came with 2 huge plug in coils, and a dynamotor to power it up.  No BFO, but it was my first novice receiver and I worked a lot of CW with it even without the BFO.  By the way,  I still have it, it is fully original, same tubes, same everything, and it STILL WORKS!  I power it up about once a year.
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N7DM
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« Reply #29 on: April 29, 2011, 07:22:24 AM »

HI...HI...........  Nope, I'm a Seven; MY surplus barn was near Tacoma [where my Dad would drive me]

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