Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Whole House Surge Protector  (Read 3114 times)
KB3FFH
Member

Posts: 162




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: April 04, 2011, 04:39:48 AM »

Check out Intermatic Panel Guard. Also use a surge surpression strip at the receptacle. You get what you pay for.
Logged
K3GM
Member

Posts: 1800




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: April 04, 2011, 09:34:26 AM »

I use the Joslyn-Surgitron model #1265-85-P on my entrance panel.  It employs a matrix of replaceable MOV modules across all possible combinations.  It's been a few years since I installed it, but I've never had a problem.
Logged
K2OWK
Member

Posts: 1063




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: April 04, 2011, 09:26:11 PM »

I used a unit called a Titewadd it is UL approved and has been around for many years. It mounts in the service entrance box, and protects against direct lightning strikes as well as surges. It is destroyed when hit, but depending on the length of the leads on it, will stop the surge a few inches from the service box. The shorter the leads the better. I used one of these in lightning ally Florida for many years and never had a problem, you can read about it on there website. I have nothing to do with this company, but have used there product with good results. Another good company is Polyphaser. They have been around for a long time also and make a very good product.

Hope this helps.

73s
Barry K2OWK
Logged
GRADY
Member

Posts: 14




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: April 06, 2011, 08:59:37 PM »

Dick  AD4U has a good point there. I had a house in Forest County Pa that was  located close to a Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 480 foot tall radio tower. Matter fact there transformer vault was in my yard. Any ways the state(Commonwealth) had the local co-op (power company) install one those surge protection devices installed on my meter. I can not prove it worked although i assume it must have because i use to sit back during thunderstorms and watch the tower get hit. I never had any problems during a storm. Now i have a place in Latrobe i contacted the power company here and they installed the same type unit here and for the same cost and liability cost Dick  AD4U stated. They check the unit and maintain it and if it does get smoked they will replace it i think that is a great deal. Jeff

I have been in the electrical trade for over 25 years now, and I would be surprised if all utility  suppliers did not offer something along this lines. Another means of revenue for them. I am not on a coop, but a private supplier, and I know they have offered them for here for a while. At one point Hubbell was making one that fit between the meter and the meter socket and could be bought through an electrical distributor. I don't know how well it fared, as most utilities don't want anything on their side that they did not install. Liability issues probably. I don't know about everywhere else, but here they supply the meter socket and meter so they can control what is out there.
Logged

KF5KZX just the new guy on the block!
W3LK
Member

Posts: 5639




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: April 07, 2011, 10:13:52 AM »

I just received an eMail from Connecticut Light and Power about a whole-house protector in the meter base. They offer a unit for $62 installation fee and $4.95/mo. They also provide five inline suppressors for in-house electronics.

I will be having the installation done when I return from vacation the end of the month.

73,

Lon - W3LK
Naugatuck, Connecticut
Logged

A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
KE4JOY
Member

Posts: 1377




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: April 07, 2011, 10:46:32 AM »

I just received an eMail from Connecticut Light and Power about a whole-house protector in the meter base. They offer a unit for $62 installation fee and $4.95/mo. They also provide five inline suppressors for in-house electronics.

I will be having the installation done when I return from vacation the end of the month.

73,

Lon - W3LK
Naugatuck, Connecticut


Do they offer any sort of warranty or 'insurance' in case the thing should fail?

I am going to assume this is a 'feed through' style meter and not a C.T. (current transformer) type here. CT meters are very uncommon for services less than 200 amps. Especially for single phase.

Another question, how long is the feeder from the meter can/socket to your 'main' electric panel? If its more than 10 feet or so you still have a gap in the protection in that a surge could be picked up inductively in the feeder itself between the meter and the panel. Also where is the earth ground connected? If it is connected at the main panel/disconnect (which it should be) and there is some distance between the meter and that panel/disconnect that could result in a relatively high impedance path to ground. High enough impedance and the TVSS is rendered useless.

Hopefully this wont be an issue but just some things to consider.
Logged
W3LK
Member

Posts: 5639




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: April 07, 2011, 01:21:05 PM »

Thanks for the questions. I'll look into the warranty situation before I leap. Smiley

The ground for the meter is directly below the meter/base. The service panel is on the other side of the wall - maybe six feet. The panel ground is the cold water line, which IS copper through the ground. The wiring is about 25 years old, for the most part. The house was rewired in the mid-80s and a new service panel installed at that time. The meter is one of the new, digital, remote reading meters.

Again, thanks for the things to check on.

Logged

A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
KE4JOY
Member

Posts: 1377




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: April 07, 2011, 01:53:46 PM »

Sounds like you will be fine.

Copper pipe in the ground? Are you sure? Most older homes have galvanized steel for the service line and then transition to copper. Go look at the water meter box on the side of the meter that goes into your house  Wink But hey galv. steel will work as well.

I am a little supprised that there is no driven ground rod. There may be one there thats covered up. You may even consider adding one or two if you can. I did not catch what your QTH is but in some parts of the country it can take 3 or more ground rods to get below the 'required' 25 ohms. Oh if you decide on two put them in a T or Y configuration spaced apart a distance equal to their length as opposed to in series. What size is the service? (Main breaker rating)

The only way to be certain about the ground is to have someone megger it. They have meggers now that you just clamp around the ground conductor. How they work I have no idea but I have seen them in use and they do work. Its a quick check and if you know an electrician you can probably 'bribe' them to conduct the test.

ps; Dont get me started on smart meters  Lips sealed
« Last Edit: April 07, 2011, 02:02:18 PM by KE4JOY » Logged
W3LK
Member

Posts: 5639




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: April 07, 2011, 04:17:10 PM »

Copper pipe in the ground? Are you sure? Most older homes have galvanized steel for the service line and then transition to copper. Go look at the water meter box on the side of the meter that goes into your house  Wink But hey galv. steel will work as well.

Yup, copper through the foundation - and all through the house.

Quote
I am a little supprised that there is no driven ground rod. There may be one there thats covered up.

No ground rod below the panel. It's 200A service. Additional grounding outside will go in this summer.

Quote
The only way to be certain about the ground is to have someone megger it. They have meggers now that you just clamp around the ground conductor. How they work I have no idea but I have seen them in use and they do work. Its a quick check and if you know an electrician you can probably 'bribe' them to conduct the test.
Something else to cjeck out. I'l try to the CL&P to check it when they put in the TVSS.

Quote
ps; Dont get me started on smart meters  Lips sealed

I have them on all three meters.
Logged

A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!