Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 2 [3]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: cb at 5 watts using a dipole.....  (Read 6404 times)
KD4LLA
Member

Posts: 450




Ignore
« Reply #30 on: April 01, 2011, 07:25:29 PM »

There must be some kind of school thing going on here in the states this weekend.  A local ham was telling me about setting a ham station up in school to demo to kids this Saturday.

You will never get a kid interested in radio when he carries a smartphone with 3/4G.  You want to impress the kids, setup an independent wireless (33 centimeter band) link w/ video and voice, a mile or two apart.  But even that will be a tough sell as many use Skype and other video technologies through a computer.

A CB, 5 watts, and a dipole?  Not going to get anyone to pay attention, that's the reality.

Mike
Logged
N4ZAW
Member

Posts: 83


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #31 on: April 02, 2011, 08:20:32 AM »

An antron99 (popular 'glass CB antenna) is little more than a half-wave over a quarter-wave dipole with a capacitive matchin network built-into it's base mounted vertically..... Short answer: Of course you can.
Performance is not going to wow anyone tho. If you want to teach those younguns about amateur radio, build a "rockmite" transceiver, hook-up a CW key connect it to that dipole you just made. NOW you're "sparking" some interest.

« Last Edit: April 02, 2011, 08:22:19 AM by N4ZAW » Logged
KB7QND
Member

Posts: 43




Ignore
« Reply #32 on: April 02, 2011, 11:49:06 AM »

1.  I'd have to agree with one of the comments mentioned earlier.  Don't teach the kids any bad habits about straying outside of what the law specifies.  Attitudes like that have caused major problems with our society nowadays.  I know, I work for the AZ Highway Patrol, and I've seen the "law doesn't apply to me" attitude quite frequently.

2.  You have a ham ticket, use it.

3.  Even if you erected an awesome antenna and your signal was strong at the receiving end; odds are the person that would be hearing you would in no way have any similar setup to respond to you.  You could be doing a lot of talking to a lot of dead air unless you want to work local stations.  
Logged
KB3HG
Member

Posts: 404




Ignore
« Reply #33 on: April 04, 2011, 10:15:00 AM »



Contact the local clubs, get on the local repeaters, I looked up your area, 4 repeaters

Benton, IL            146.805    88.5    KB9ADK    0.0            LEARS    E WX TT
Marion, IL            145.190    88.5    AA9ET    19.0S    SCAN CLUB    
Marion, IL            146.640    88.5    W9RNM    19.0S    SARA    CA E
Tamaroa, IL    146.985    107.2 N9LUD    19.4W    T.A.R.A.    


Put the call out, you could use a bit of help and to borrow a rig and power supply, antenna,ect otherwise known as a go kit. There are probably several people that have extra equipment that they can loan you. Radio examples are great for teaching physics and math.

Tom Kb3hg
Logged
KB1TXK
Member

Posts: 438


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #34 on: April 04, 2011, 10:23:12 AM »

It may also help to coordinate this w/ another ham on the RX end, so that the lack of replies and constant dead-air doesn't reinforce the "you old people and your broken radio crap" teenager opinion.
Logged

N4CR
Member

Posts: 1650




Ignore
« Reply #35 on: April 04, 2011, 04:07:31 PM »

I just now ran across the 150 mile talk limit....never knew that was there....

It's been ignored for so long it's not even legacy information.
Logged

73 de N4CR, Phil

We are Coulomb of Borg. Resistance is futile. Voltage, on the other hand, has potential.
N1DVJ
Member

Posts: 383




Ignore
« Reply #36 on: April 05, 2011, 05:22:21 AM »

Are you using a 23 or 40 channel radio? legal power was reduced from 5 watts(23ch radio) down to four watts (40 channel radio). That's why you can still use a 23 ch radio (If you are the original owner) BUT reselling the older radios is frowned upon.
WRONG!
They went from 5W INPUT power rating to 4W OUTPUT.  And most 23 channel CBs were gargage.  The worst of them were even WORSE as 40 channel units.

Some manufacturers came out with 'interim' rigs as 23channel closeouts, like the synthesized TRC-152 to replace the crystal mixer version TRC-52.  The 40 channel TRC-452 was the '40-channel' version.  The 152 could easily do 4W, but the audio was limited.  You got FANTASTIC performance if you turned the RF back slightly to about 3.5W and let the 'trapezoid' fill completely.  And you're not going to find any real performance difference.  When I sold my CB, I had offered a guy a brand new TRC-452, but turned out he wanted 'my' rig, which was the TRC-152 because it sounded better than almost anybody on the air.

The other misconception was that the FCC cracked down on manufactures with regard to 'clarifiers' on SSB rigs, mandating that they be RX only.  This led to a misconception that the rigs were inferior to the 23 channel rigs.  But it was easy to mod the rigs.  And if done right, they couldn't be detected as mod from how they sounded on the air, it was just that they could 'tune'.  The problem was idiots who didn't know what they were doing that did mods that let the clarifier be unstable and people sounded terrible on the air.  That was not a fault of the rigs, but of the idiotic @$$holes who had a little knowledge and were truely dangerous with it.

True, some 40-channel rigs were garbage.  Like the Johnsons, and even one of the Brownings.  But the Uniden chassis CBs, and later the GRE chassis units, were light years ahead of there 23 channel predecessors.
« Last Edit: April 05, 2011, 05:24:19 AM by N1DVJ » Logged
N1DVJ
Member

Posts: 383




Ignore
« Reply #37 on: April 05, 2011, 05:27:24 AM »

Man, this rekindles a trip down Memory Lane. Must have been 1965. 5 watt CB rig with external speech compression and roof mounted vertical antenna. Yacking with a CBer in Venezuela.  A couple of days later my dad received a letter of violation from the FCC with a threat to confiscate the equipment (the license was in dad's name as I was a wee bit too young). Needless to say mom and dad didn't appreciate the experience or my explanation of how skip works. Shortly thereafter I turned to SWLing.

Harry We1X
If I remember right, in 1965 I think CB was still under channel restrictions.  That is, not only a mileage limit, but channels were 'reserved'.  Interbusiness on some channels for different licenses, and a few channels for 'family' communication between the same license.
Logged
KD8GEH
Member

Posts: 464




Ignore
« Reply #38 on: April 05, 2011, 06:32:41 AM »

Oh the memories. I remember the channel restrictions, center (10-14) if I recall right were the call, stations to station, others were base to mobile.

Dont forget the old tube rigs, some werent too awfull bad, I remember Lafaette (sp) were popular, as well as Courier, General, Demco. I remember the single tube "Demco Modulator" lol woot, that was to hottest thing.

73 DE
KD8GEH
Logged
KE3WD
Member

Posts: 5694




Ignore
« Reply #39 on: April 05, 2011, 03:28:36 PM »

Don't forget Olson Electronic's Double Sideband monster...


73
Logged
N4NYY
Member

Posts: 4742




Ignore
« Reply #40 on: April 05, 2011, 05:16:39 PM »

Quote
I just now ran across the 150 mile talk limit....never knew that was there....

It's been ignored for so long it's not even legacy information.

The other problem with that rule was it was likely written during a cycle minimum. When the cycle is in, you hear nothing but skip. And they wipe out the locals.
Logged
N1DVJ
Member

Posts: 383




Ignore
« Reply #41 on: April 05, 2011, 06:24:52 PM »

Oh the memories. I remember the channel restrictions, center (10-14) if I recall right were the call, stations to station, others were base to mobile.

Dont forget the old tube rigs, some werent too awfull bad, I remember Lafaette (sp) were popular, as well as Courier, General, Demco. I remember the single tube "Demco Modulator" lol woot, that was to hottest thing.

73 DE
KD8GEH
Lafayette had a CB KIT back in the 60's.  You built the base station, and ordered crystals for the 'mixer' as you needed channels.  I seem to recall it only worked 100mw and after you finished it, you sent it in to be 'set up' and it came back as a 5W rig.


Neat.  But later Lafayette units were junk.
Logged
KE4ILG
Member

Posts: 149




Ignore
« Reply #42 on: April 06, 2011, 09:20:32 AM »

I've had several opportunities to demonstrate the use of cw to young people.  Ages 6 thru 17 were very impressed by cw.  I was surprised by their interest.  Others have suggested that young people are so involved with high tech electronics that it is the simplest ,cw, that they can find impressive.  Also many of the abbreviations we use in cw are used in the instant messaging. 

I realize this is off the question but you may find it helpful.  Perhaps you could get some keys and there are lots of free software on the internet to assist in leaning cw. 

Thank you for your efforts to teach students about ham radio.

                                          73, Mike ke4ilg
Logged
W8AAZ
Member

Posts: 319




Ignore
« Reply #43 on: April 09, 2011, 02:29:31 PM »

Well with a little tweaking of tuning and new crystals you can put the old crystal controlled CBs on 10 meters.  I think there are AM calling freqs on 10, still.  Might be problematic getting a contact most of the time maybe.  If you use a CB on CB you might only make them want to become truck drivers, which would be popular with parents, I bet.
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 2 [3]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!