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Author Topic: Soldering Iron Temperature  (Read 6942 times)
KF6QEX
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Posts: 590




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« Reply #15 on: April 17, 2011, 04:52:17 PM »

I heat up a screwdriver with a blow torch and use that. I know the temp is right when the screwdriver tip starts turning red.
I am only kidding but I wanted to fit in Smiley

Seriously though, I looked up a couple of datasheets that mentione lead temperature bacause other than I use my 18W iron unless I need more heat and then turn the 25W on, I didn't have a numerical answer Smiley

260-300 Celcius ( 500-572 Farenheit) seems to be the numerically correct answer. The rest is kinda like my blowtorch joke Smiley

I looked up a 1N4001 diode and I picked one of the LM317  Voltage regulator variations from the Datasheets on Digikey.

Lead temperature according to the good folks at Vishay for their 1N4001 is 275C (572F)
http://www.vishay.com/docs/88503/1n4001.pdf

National Semiconductor  specifies 260C (500F) or 300C (572F) depending on metal or plastic packaging of the LM117
http://cache.national.com/ds/LM/LM117.pdf

Depending on components and skill level I would stick with something in the 550F to 600F range





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KD0ACY
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Posts: 91




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« Reply #16 on: April 22, 2011, 07:09:35 PM »

One thing I know for sure! When you try to solder you finger, It dosn't matter what the temp is set at,---It's gonna hurt!
Mike
KD0ACY
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KJ6EAD
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Posts: 56




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« Reply #17 on: April 23, 2011, 02:11:24 AM »

Using maximum lead temperature from a datasheet as a guide to hand soldering temperature can be misleading since those specifications are for a position on the lead at or very near the body of the device.

The temperature of the iron tip is not the same as the temperature of the solder or lead since everything you heat with the iron has thermal resistance and some sinking to ambient. This is why production hand soldering can be done with tip temperatures of 700° F to 750° F without a reduction in quality or reliability when performed with good technique.
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