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Author Topic: Engine Noise  (Read 3013 times)
N4LEW
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« on: April 20, 2011, 12:35:11 PM »

Hi,
I've read a bunch of the entries here on engine noise but none of them have quite the same issue that I have.  My problem started about a month ago.  I have static/popping noise on my two meter rig when my Jeep is running.  It get's worse with higher RPM's and it's not the whining alternator type of noise.  I have tried turning on the vehicle without starting the engine to see if it appears to be from the fuel pump, no noise if the engine isn't running.
But here's the interesting part, I get the exact same noise on any rig even my HT as far as 20 feet away from the vehicle.   It is definately something that has gone bad on the vehicle.  I'm just looking to see if anyone has any ideas or experience.  My vehicle is a 1999 Jeep Wrangler with the 2.5 4cyl engine.  I'm thinking its either a broken ground, the electronc ignition, or maybe the fuel injection.
Any help would be very much appreciated.   
73,
Larry / n4lew
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K1CJS
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« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2011, 12:54:35 PM »

I'll bet that you have either a bad spark plug wire or a bad plug.  Check all the plug wires first--at both ends--to see if one got loosened.  If not, try going out at night, (or parking the Jeep in a garage that can be darkened) starting the engine and looking at the plug wires.  You may find one that is sparking.  If you can't see any sparking, try moving the wires around with a small stick while listening to the rig.  Moving one of the wires will either stop the sparking or make it change--and that is the wire you need to check.

Another way to do the check is to use a multimeter and read the resistance of each wire.  One may have resistance significantly higher, and that's the one that is probably giving you the noise.

Of course, you'll probably have to replace the entire set of wires, plugs--or both.

Good luck!

 
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K0BG
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« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2011, 03:08:20 PM »

Yours is a better idea. Replace the plugs, and the wires with factory-spec replacements. Make sure the plugs are properly gapped.

You might want to go to my web site, and read the Ignition & Injectors article.
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N4LEW
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« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2011, 04:48:29 AM »

Thanks for the replies and the link to the article. I hadn't thought of the spark plugs and wires, don't know why, but I'll definitely look into that, probably just replace them. I post my results.
Thanks!  Larry / n4lew
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WV4I
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« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2011, 06:06:17 AM »

If you can get access, I'd pull one plug wire at a time, either at spark plug or distributor end, run engine on 3 cyls, see if problem goes away, obviously pulling wires and reconnecting with engine turned OFF. If no help, your dist/elec ignition may be bad, or you could have another bad device that changes activation rate with engine rpm. But, the fact that it's audible from 20 feet away points strongly to the ignition system.
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K0BG
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« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2011, 07:16:05 AM »

Actually, pulling off just one wire isn't a very good suggestion. Doing so on most late model vehicles (made after 1985), will cause (at a minimum) an EGS error code to be written to the OBDII. If you don't have a code reader/eraser, you're out about $50 to have the dealer do it for you.
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N4LEW
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« Reply #6 on: April 24, 2011, 09:44:23 AM »

Well I went out and bought the plugs, wires, distributor cap, and rotor.  I replaced the rotor and cap first mostly because one of the plugs wires is about impossible to get a without taking the AC compressor off.  Anyway I  thought I had it but it came back in a few miles.  That makes me think it's probably a wire.  So as soon as I can get a tool to get that one wire off, I'll replace them and post my results.
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W8JX
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« Reply #7 on: April 24, 2011, 04:25:34 PM »

I have never seen a rotor or cap cause this but plugs and/or wires can.
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K0BG
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« Reply #8 on: April 25, 2011, 09:23:07 AM »

You thing spark plugs make noise, crack a distributor cap, and you won't believe the RFI!
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W8JX
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« Reply #9 on: April 26, 2011, 05:08:26 AM »

You thing spark plugs make noise, crack a distributor cap, and you won't believe the RFI!

Maybe but never seen it. Plug wire and plugs are the worse radiators here.
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KI4SDY
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« Reply #10 on: April 26, 2011, 06:53:15 AM »

It is probably the hard to get to plug wire. It may just not be seated properly because it was hard to install in the first place.  Wink
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K0BG
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« Reply #11 on: April 26, 2011, 08:05:39 AM »

I've been playing mobile radio for over 40 years. I've seen all manner of ignition problems, from bad rotors, cracked caps, bad wires, internal arcing of spark plugs, loose coil clamps, defective points and/or caps, and even a loose connection on a ballast resistor.

Just wait until you diagnose one of the new, all-in-one, injector-igniter-knock sensor units.
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W8JX
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« Reply #12 on: April 26, 2011, 09:23:33 AM »

Just wait until you diagnose one of the new, all-in-one, injector-igniter-knock sensor units.

Been there done that long ago. And, it you do not not use cheap 87 octane fuel you will never even hear it.
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K0BG
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« Reply #13 on: April 26, 2011, 11:24:02 AM »

Okay Stan, you seem to know it all. You said...

Quote
Been there done that long ago. And, it you do not not use cheap 87 octane fuel you will never even hear it.

Tell me. What is the 2011 vehicle model, the very first one incidentally to use the combined unit?
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W8JX
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« Reply #14 on: April 26, 2011, 03:31:12 PM »

Okay Stan, you seem to know it all. You said...

Quote
Been there done that long ago. And, it you do not not use cheap 87 octane fuel you will never even hear it.

Tell me. What is the 2011 vehicle model, the very first one incidentally to use the combined unit?

Applegate, am not claiming to be a know it all but you are. And the point of this is that you want to get into some childish p__ing contest? Play that game somewhere else as you are looking trouble not trying to prevent it. BTW the concept was "born" on GM vehicles nearly 30 years ago and serves no real purpose (it might increase MPG slightly under some conditions but don't bet on it) other than to imit motor knock complaints and keep masses in ignorant bliss of engines "true" octane needs because they will spend 30, 40k and more on cars and yet would feed it 83 octane if they could find and buy it cheaper than 87. Chrysler of the big three (and with shallowest pockets) was the last to embrace this concept of spark knock masking. Do you remember their V10 truck engine, they had to reduce compression ratio in them last few years because people were pulling them hard (they were strong engines) feeding them 87 octane and were frying valves in them. (sustained spark knock before it gets too loud can cause valves to vibrate in seats and leak and lead to burning over time) BTW there is no signal from sensor unless a vibration is "heard" that is in the frequency range associated with "fuel" knock that sensor is tuned too.  Many many years ago I built a simple circuit that would trigger a light when a signal was heard on Generation 2 GM knock sensor. After playing with it for a while it lead me to abandon 87 octane  in all my vehicles that were of modern design.
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