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Author Topic: Butternut HF9V Question  (Read 5147 times)
KD8HMO
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Posts: 228




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« on: April 25, 2011, 09:51:03 AM »

A few months ago, I was "busted" by my landlord for my 80m Windom dipole. Its really too big for the property and I had to string it through some trees around the back yard. If he approves, I have decided to purchase a Butternut HF6V or HF9V instead. Can anyone tell me how long the radials are in the ground radial kit? Im trying to figure out how far away from the back of the apartment to mount the antenna. If I mount this antenna on the ground mount, what kind of performance can I expect from it? Will I need an antenna tuner too? I plan on using this antenna with a Kenwood TS-530S and a TS-520S.
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2011, 10:16:46 AM »

If you install the antenna at ground level, the length of the radials isn't critical but the longer they are, and the more of them you use, the better the antenna will work.

With the HFxV antennas, about 40-50 radials that are about 30-35' long each work very well.  They can all be flat on the ground, or even a bit below the surface to hide them.

The "radial kit" is for elevated installations where the antenna is not installed at ground level and last one I saw included multiband radials that were about 30' long as well as extra wire to make some radials for 80 meters, which should be about 65' long each (at least two, preferably three or four).

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NI0C
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« Reply #2 on: April 25, 2011, 11:03:33 AM »

The GRK-1 "Ground Radial Kit" sold by Bencher / Butternut is described here: http://www.bencher.com/pdfs/00404IZV.pdf

It's just 12 wires 30 or 32 ft. long with ring terminals crimped at the ends.  That's it!  Buy yourself a couple of 500 ft. spool of 14 ga. or 16 ga. insulated stranded copper wire at Home Depot, and cut your own radials. You'll save a lot of money.

To answer your other questions, put the vertical as far away from the apartment and other buildings as you can get it.  As Steve said, put in at least 40 radials.  These antennas play very well.  Follow the tuning instructions carefully, and take time to make the antenna resonant in each band.  Don't rely on the tuner.   

73,
Chuck  NI0C
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KD8HMO
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« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2011, 11:05:38 AM »

Does the antenna come with the plate that the radials connect too? Or is that included in the kit?
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2011, 11:26:39 AM »

Does the antenna come with the plate that the radials connect too? Or is that included in the kit?

Nope.  It's not included, and you really don't need one.  The radial wires can all connect to the lower mounting tube bolt, just below the active portion of the antenna.

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AB3CX
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« Reply #5 on: April 28, 2011, 01:18:17 PM »

When I used an HF9-V for several years.  I created a wire circle about 18 inches in diameter out of #12 copper wire, and set iton the ground with the vertical in the center. I ran 2 wires from 180 degree points of the circle to the ground tubing of the vertical, and soldered all my radials to the wire circle and ran them out on the ground. Cheap and as good as any other solution to the problem.  Use any type of wire you can get, if you want to be fancy bury it, if not, be careful when mowing.
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MM0KTC
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« Reply #6 on: July 04, 2011, 05:13:48 AM »

Radials
have you considered using wire netting, similar to that used on a chicken pen, make a square mat on the floor, say 6m x 6m and connect antenna to that. i use this configuration on a StepIR Vert and the results are the best.

Keith
MM0KTC
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N6DMR
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Posts: 34




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« Reply #7 on: September 27, 2011, 12:57:50 PM »

I have found that 16 ground radials seem to work out pretty well.  I have a protable setup using 16 tape measures and radials.  I used 16 foot long tape measures and found that it give a reasonable result and a narrow bandwidth on 80M that is about 30Khz which is what is referenced in the Bencher manual as "NORMAL" when you have a good groundplane.  You can do more radials and longer radials and may see slight increases in performance but my setup works well and I have had a lot of great contacts with it.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Butternut-antennas/photos/album/785442384/pic/list

I posted some pitures of my setup in the Butternut Yahoo Group

Duane
K3AL
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K6JEA
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Posts: 37




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« Reply #8 on: September 27, 2011, 08:20:20 PM »

I just set one of these up. Ground mounted with 1000 ft of radials of varying length. Used a 3 ft. piece of soft copper tubing bent into a circle instead of a radial plate. Butted the ends together and wrapped it with copper foil and soldered. Drilled small holes in it and soldered the radials into the holes. Then used another piece of foil soldered to the ring to attach it to the base of the antenna. Used two rolls of 14 gauge solid insulated wire from Lowes.

Tuning is tedious. An antenna analyzer such as the MFJ 259B attached to the tuning stub will save you a LOT of time and frustration as the suggest lengths of the coils and wires are just a starting point. I got the match down pretty well on all bands but still use the internal tuner in the rig to fine tune it.

There is a Yahoo group with a lot of great info on these antennas including discussions on tuning that are much better than the instructions that come with the unit.

 http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Butternut-antennas

Have fun, it is a great antenna.

Jim

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N8CMQ
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« Reply #9 on: September 27, 2011, 08:34:47 PM »

I have 125 30+ feet radials under my vertical. I bought copperclad steel wire for wire welding.
A big spool of welding wire did the entire radial field in a 60 foot square.
My stainless ground plate is a sink drain plug for a kitchen sink...
http://www.myspace.com/n8cmq/blog is where I have photos and a write up!
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W8JI
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« Reply #10 on: September 28, 2011, 03:34:05 AM »

I have 125 30+ feet radials under my vertical. I bought copperclad steel wire for wire welding.
A big spool of welding wire did the entire radial field in a 60 foot square.
My stainless ground plate is a sink drain plug for a kitchen sink...
http://www.myspace.com/n8cmq/blog is where I have photos and a write up!

There is a very thin copper coated wire, but it has the outdoor life expectancy of bare steel. It will rust within weeks, and can rust totally through in months.

The best wire is solid copper, either insulated or bare.
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AD6KA
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« Reply #11 on: September 28, 2011, 04:58:25 PM »

I have had a  cople HV6V since 1983, operating from vastky different locales, and have always enjoyed it's servic and performance.

BUT....DO NOT try what Butternut calls their
CPK:
COUNTERPOISE FOR HF6VX/HF9VX

http://www.hamradio.com/detail.cfm?pid=H0-004303

THis "Shorthened Counterpoise" is useless, a complete
$200 WASTE OF MONEY!
 All it consists of is 4, 5 foot aluminum rods at antenna ground.    Ans the also supply some cheap wire to string between the rods like a "Spiderweb" between the
"So called ground rods" allegedly to rduce groud loss?

THe HF6V is a terrific antenna and I have only had on come apart on me (unguyed.... DOH!) and the main element broke
above all the coils. The antenna was taken down with an estimated 80m gust. A seasonal and not uncommon in this area, (Google 'Santa Ana Winds' and "San Fernando Valley"
......micro gusts have been measured to 120 mph).

That antennna element had a 6" visible crack in it that I had ben meaning to replace or reguy....by live and learn.
See that happens to those who procrastinate?
« Last Edit: September 28, 2011, 05:02:57 PM by AD6KA » Logged
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