Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: CALL SIGNS  (Read 1753 times)
KD5RGJ
Member

Posts: 33




Ignore
« on: May 06, 2011, 02:15:04 PM »

Where can I find a history of call signs? I am especially interested in the switch from W calls to K calls and how far did the W calls go...ie WA-WB-WC-WD, ETC.
Spencer Hudson
KD5RGJ
Logged
W7ETA
Member

Posts: 2527




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2011, 02:51:25 PM »

I worked WA, WB, and WD4 (Witch Doctor).

My call was WB1AUW during those times.

Most ops came up with interesting phonetics to aide others to remember the ops call sign.

I still remember a W8 or W9 using Father And Mother, another op in 1 land using King Cookie Eater, ZS4 Push Button.

At one time the Mississippi river was the dividing boundary for call signs--W east and K west.

Best from Tucson
Bob
Logged
K3GM
Member

Posts: 1819




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2011, 02:52:07 PM »

VanityHQ might be of some help.
Logged
W5FYI
Member

Posts: 1046




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2011, 10:00:12 PM »

Or Fred, www.w5yi.org, or John Johnston at www.w3BEinformed.org. John is the Rules and Regs guy for the Quarter Century Wireless Association, and if he doesn't have the information on his web site, he can certainly find it. Fred, W5YI, is a VE Coordinator and used to publish "Dits and Bits," a newsletter that often contained the kindS of information you seek. gl
Logged
NM7L
Member

Posts: 13




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2011, 08:47:34 AM »

Spencer.

Here is a link: http://www.qsl.net/ecara/wayback/main.html

This is a radio history series called "The Wayback Machine" by Bill Continelli, W2XOY.  Issue 33 will answer the date the shift was made.

From my own research here is where US Amateur Radio W 2x3 callsigns were at the time of shift in 1978:

Call Areas 1, 2, 3, & 7: WB#xxx
All Other Contiguous US Call Areas: WD#xxx

Non-Contiguous US call areas at this time all started with K (i.e: KL7xxx, KH6xxx, KZ5xxx, KP4xxx)

Logged
NM7L
Member

Posts: 13




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2011, 09:01:24 AM »

At one time the Mississippi river was the dividing boundary for call signs--W east and K west.

Bob,

Only in commercial broadcast licenses was this boundary a factor (W-east, K-west); and exists to this day.  Issuance of Amateur Radio callsigns were never influenced by this rule.

73,  Mark
Logged
K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2814




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: May 07, 2011, 09:26:38 AM »

There are some notable exceptions to the East/West of the Mississippi River "rule".  The one that pops to my mind first is KDKA, in Pittsburgh.
Logged

73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
K3ZL
Member

Posts: 132




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: May 07, 2011, 11:43:45 AM »


"The Wayback Machine" by Bill Continelli, W2XOY.  Issue 33 will answer the date the shift was made.

Thanks for the link to Bill's website.  I enjoyed listening to his part in This Week In Amateur Radio TWIAR.  Do you know if he is doing any podcast work?
Logged
W7ETA
Member

Posts: 2527




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: May 07, 2011, 01:58:26 PM »

TKS
73
Bob
Logged
K2OWK
Member

Posts: 1066




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: May 07, 2011, 02:01:36 PM »

Hello KD5RGJ, My father in law W4JFN (SK) got is call in the 1930s. I got my call in the mid 1950s. The switchover from W to K occurred about in the early 1950s. From K to WA in the 1960s. This is from memory so it may not be exact. Hope it helps.

Barry
K2OWK
Logged
KE3WD
Member

Posts: 5689




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: May 07, 2011, 05:05:02 PM »

The way this old Pittsburh native was told it, KDKA - and KQV, Pittsburgh, PA, got grandfathered in because they already had been issued the callsigns when some bureaucrat decided to go with the W east, K west deal.  One would think that W = West would of made more sense...

KDKA was originally 8XK, an Amateur call. 

73
Logged
W6OU
Member

Posts: 192




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: May 07, 2011, 08:05:54 PM »

Back in the 1930's, the USA ham W vs K prefix was based on geography. Hams in Hawaii were given the K6 prefix from the same sequence that Californians were given the W6 prefix. For example, if the latest California call issued was W6CCC, and the next license was for a Hawaii ham, he would be issued K6CCD and W6CCD would not be issued. The next Californian would get W6CCE. I think the same applied for Alaska (K7) and other US territories.
Logged
NO2A
Member

Posts: 801




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: May 19, 2011, 08:10:46 PM »

KYW newsradio 1060,and channel 3 in Philly,PA
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!