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Author Topic: Hams getting recognition  (Read 2985 times)
KE7KPB
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Posts: 29




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« on: May 08, 2011, 08:16:12 AM »

In every community there are hams, and on many occasions they go unnoticed. 
People are forgetting that HAM even exists except for the occasional antenna and license plate with numbers and letters on them. There are times the Amateur Radio community needs to remind the general public of what the hams are really up to. They are more than people talking on a radio; they are also the emergency communications backbone. In Billings Montana, the Yellowstone Radio Club was asked by the city Fire Department to find out what would happen if the 800 MHz repeater system were to fail and how hams could fill the void in that communication. This was a good test in what we Amateurs could really do in an emergency. Ron Glass is the one that heads up the Y.A.R.E.S (Yellowstone Amateur Radio Emergency Service) and has really made a difference in the way our community thinks about hams. When the emergency sirens are sounded, hams are deployed to each one in the county to watch on how they operate and report their findings to the City. This calculates into many volunteer hours to the community.
During the most recent test some of the volunteers were interviewed by our local TV media. When these programs were aired, people started talking about ham radio again. This was a good shot in the arm for our hobby and we have had more interest from the people of Billings.  If you want to see the interviews from this test please go to   http://www.k7efa.net/.  This is a good way to get the word out about our hobby and what hams are about. I do encourage everyone to get involved the local clubs and emergency service in your community and get the local media involved. This can only help renew interest in our hobby and emergency communications. Grin
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K1CJS
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Posts: 6034




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« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2011, 07:35:47 AM »

IMHO, if you're a ham and perform community service to 'get noticed', you're doing it for the wrong reason.  Yes, it is nice to get some recognition, but if you don't.....

There is always someone that will give you a 'thanks' and make your day.

OTOH, if you're speaking of the ham radio community as a whole, yes, I agree that there is not enough recognition--out front and in plain view.  However, there is a lot of recognition behind the scenes, and the people who do recognize the services performed don't usually forget.  Many a times I have heard of a ham who wanted a permit for a tower--or just to put up some antennas, and the people in government (not HOA committees or other quazi-nazi groups) try to be as accommodating as they can be.
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KI4SDY
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Posts: 1452




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« Reply #2 on: May 09, 2011, 06:11:26 PM »

Glad to see that hams are involving themselves in community service! It gives real meaning to the hobby and helps the community relate to amateur radio operators.  Grin
« Last Edit: June 03, 2011, 05:43:45 AM by KI4SDY » Logged
KD8NGE
Member

Posts: 36




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« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2011, 08:04:58 PM »

When our chief lab tech found I'd gotten my General ticket, he was as happy as if I'd given him a hundred dollar bill.
He pulled me into his office, shut the door, poured me a coffee and had me set down.
It seems he is prior military.
He didn't elaborate on where he was or what he did, but he carried a Second John rank and was a tall skinny kid a long way from home, and an unknown ham -- a MARS operator -- linked him in with his father.
It was the last conversation he had with the man before his father fell over dead from a heart attack.
That last conversation, and that it was enabled by a ham radio operator, made a deep, lasting, and very positive impression on this fellow.
We often do not realize the good that we do, but sometimes ... sometimes it is noticed.
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AD6KA
Member

Posts: 2237




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« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2011, 09:45:58 PM »

Quote
They are more than people talking on a radio; they are also the emergency communications backbone
**Maybe** in a small town like Billings, MT.
What's the population there? 100k and some change?
I'm glad your "tests" worked out for you and all, don't get me wrong.

But ham radio as the "Encom Backbone" in a city of several million people?
HAH! Never happen. Or statewide or national? Please, it's a joke.


Quote
I do encourage everyone to get involved the local clubs and emergency service in your community and get the local media involved.
This can only help renew interest in our hobby and emergency communications.
Right, Encoms will save the hobby!
Keep on believing that idiotic pablum the ARRL tries to spoon feed us.
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K7RBW
Member

Posts: 392




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« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2011, 08:39:12 AM »

When our chief lab tech found I'd gotten my General ticket, he was as happy as if I'd given him a hundred dollar bill.
He pulled me into his office, shut the door, poured me a coffee and had me set down.
It seems he is prior military.
He didn't elaborate on where he was or what he did, but he carried a Second John rank and was a tall skinny kid a long way from home, and an unknown ham -- a MARS operator -- linked him in with his father.
It was the last conversation he had with the man before his father fell over dead from a heart attack.
That last conversation, and that it was enabled by a ham radio operator, made a deep, lasting, and very positive impression on this fellow.
We often do not realize the good that we do, but sometimes ... sometimes it is noticed.
I'll take one of those moments over 100 spots on the evening news any day of the week.

Thanks for posting it!

I'm all for positive press (given how little of it there is in general) and recognition, but IIRC, even in the best case Ham radio is a supporting role and not a starring role. Ham radio trying to claim the spotlight, IMO, would be like a backup singer trying to take center stage from the star (not particularly a good way to be remembered).

But, if you really feel your Ham radio contributions need more press exposure, you can always prepare your own Electronic Press Kit and send it to the various media outlets.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2011, 08:42:06 AM by K7RBW » Logged
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6034




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« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2011, 10:32:54 AM »

Right, Encoms will save the hobby!
Keep on believing that idiotic pablum the ARRL tries to spoon feed us.

Welcome to the ranks of those who see right through the propaganda.  Other hams keep saying that everything the ARRL does helps amateur radio.  I happen to think that their idiotic "emergency communication" stressing is HARMING ham radio more than it is helping it.

Look at the recent permits issued by the FCC to Recon Robotics.  Did the ARRL help there?  Sure they made a noise, but that is ALL they did.  And once there are many of those robotic explorers out in the country and the world, there isn't going to be any way of revoking that permit--not unless Recon Robotics is willing to pull in each and every one of those units to retool the electronics in them.
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