Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Best way to learn code ??????  (Read 2693 times)
KD8OTT
Member

Posts: 26




Ignore
« on: April 30, 2011, 12:48:04 PM »

I know this has probably been asked a thousand times and there probably a thousand answers. What is the best way, I know all letters by heart and know alot of the tones such as CQ and others but what is the best way to get it and I know alot of practice. There are programs out there for sale I wont name the one that refers to word that relate to the letter and others I really want to get this conquered so I can get on the air.  Thanks Bryon Thornton  KD8OTT Huh
Logged
KJ1H
Member

Posts: 47


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2011, 12:54:32 PM »

If you already know all the letters, numbers, prosigns, and such, then congratulations - you know the code.  I used the 5wpm tapes to learn it in the first place (I'm dating myself here, I know).  From there, I simply got on the air and made contacts.  There are some great programs out there now to simulate contacts, right down to variable QRN and QSB, but for me there's nothing as good as the real thing, or as enjoyable.

Call CQ at the speed you want to receive at, no matter how slow that is.  A decent CW operator will slow down to your pace, no matter how slow that is.  If it's still too quick, don't be afraid to send PSE QRS. 

Personally, when tuning around the dial, I keep an ear out for particularly slow CQ calls so that I can answer them - slowly - and help them learn the code.  I doubt I'm the only one who does this.
Logged

73 - Justin
N3PDT
Member

Posts: 75




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2011, 02:37:05 PM »

I'll second what Justin said. If you know the alphabet, etc. just get on the air and call CQ at a comfortably slow speed. Maybe even a little slower than comfortable at first.

A good frequency to try is 7.114, the SKCC Elmer frequency. Almost always someone monitoring that one for new ops.

Sending and receiving live code IS the best practice. Have fun, and I'll listen for you. Feel free to PM or email me if you'd like to set up a sked.

Doug N3PDT
Logged
K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2814




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2011, 09:01:04 PM »

Absolutely.  The only way to learn code beyond knowing the various sound patterns is to get on the air and actually USE it under real-world conditions: noise, interference, weak or changing signal strengths, and combinations of these.  Another plus for actually using it is that you never REALLY know what the other guy is going to say.  You expect to hear his name, his location, your report -- but in what order?

And KD8OTT - you have a great suffix!  I knew of a guy in Seattle, W7OTT, who used to drive some folks crazy with his phonetics.  "This is Whiskey Seven One Two Three, go."  He had a distinctive voice, so you expected it when he said it.  Newcomers were shocked and appalled!
Logged

73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
BG8VZ
Member

Posts: 14




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: April 30, 2011, 10:32:53 PM »

I am a new hand in morse code ,as I know, can use software to practice CW .Now ,I use "Morse runner" to listen and remember the code .If you have patience ,listen and practice two hour everyday,after 6 month ,you can very profiient to operate on the key !And I you QSO with some higher class hams ,they will slow down the speed to let you copy the code.
Logged
NI0C
Member

Posts: 2408




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2011, 05:46:04 AM »

Spend some time exploring and using the excellent "Learn CW Online" website: http://lcwo.net/

There's something there for everyone who wants to improve their proficiency in Morse code.  This is not to diminish, or sell short, on the air practice; however you'll find an intensity of practice available at the website that is unavailable almost anywhere else.  It's a very efficient use of your time.

73,
Chuck  NI0C
Logged
VA7CPC
Member

Posts: 2393




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2011, 10:13:30 PM »

Quote
I really want to get this conquered so I can get on the air.

I can only repeat what others have said:

. . . If you know the characters, punctuation, and a few prosigns,

. . . . . . . the best thing you can do is get on the air.

I've used "RufzXP" for practice, but it's a very specialized "callsign-copy" program.  It'll help you in contests, but it's not good preparation for normal QSO's.   As suggested above, "LCWO" has lots of different practice protocols.  If you can't get on the air, it's worth using.

You're not the first person to ask this question.  Pretty uniformly, "get on the air!" is the advice most people give.  There's something about knowing there's _human being_ at the other end that really makes you concentrate!

                Charles

Logged
K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2814




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: May 01, 2011, 10:26:00 PM »

I "learned" Spanish when I was in High School.  I didn't MASTER it until I went to Mexico and made myself a promise:  not to use English unless it was a life-or-death situation.

Spent four months there and probably spoke English twice, but only because somebody said something to me in English and I didn't catch myself in time before I replied.

Now it's been several years since the last time I visited Mexico, but some of the kids at "my" school have parents who are more comfortable in Spanish.  I'm working with some of them on an ESL course.

As far as Morse Code, you might have "learned" it.  The trick is to MASTER it.  The way to do that is to get on the air and immerse yourself in it.
Logged

73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
WA4053SWL
Member

Posts: 171


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #8 on: May 13, 2011, 09:35:17 AM »

That site is fun: http://lcwo.net/, I practice 20 minutes a day and now I can copy indicative 25 or 30 WPM, recommended Grin
Logged
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3900




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: May 20, 2011, 09:29:52 AM »

I can relate to my own personal experience here.... so with that in mind.... I too wanted to learn the code at a fairly early age.  I had a key and oscillator and learned all of the letters and numbers.  I would send them to myself several hours a week.

However, when I went to copy code from a radio, I understood only a letter here and a number there..... but simply could not copy code.  At that time tape recorders were not available or too expensive to buy and the only recorded CW was from a company called, I think, Instructograph.  I also seem to recall they both sold or rented their machines with punched paper tapes.  This was also too expensive for a kid back in those days.

I did eventually learn the code, thanks to the U.S. Army force feeding it to me 44 hours a week for six months! 

After reflecting back on why I wasn't able to copy code even though I "knew" the letters and numbers and could send them to myself, I came to the conclusion that when I sent to myself, I knew what I was going to send and so this is what I heard! This was like wrapping your own Christmas gifts!

The character elements and character spacing was also what I 'thought' they should be.  I learned later that what I "thought" wasn't exactly correct.

The second conclusion I came to was that the only way to learn the code was to learn the letters and numbers by sending them to myself, as before, but then spend a lot of time listening to code from a recorded source.  During this time, if you can, listen to CW on the air, with the QRN & QRM plus the many variations of real people sending real time.  But it's important that you don't let this discourage you.  I've heard some horrible sending the past 55 years!

Then and only then, should one get on the air and perfect the sending, receiving and procedures.  This makes it more fun for both the one learning and also the guy who you are trying to communicate with.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!