Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: N-Prefix Callsign -- when ?  (Read 3768 times)
W8JX
Member

Posts: 5486




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: May 16, 2011, 06:36:28 AM »

I had a novice call in 69 and it was not a N8 or KN8 but a WN8. The N changed to a "B" when I upgraded.
Logged

--------------------------------------
Entered using a  WiFi Win 8.1 RT tablet or a Android tablet using 4G/LTE or WiFi.
KE4JOY
Member

Posts: 1335




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: May 19, 2011, 06:51:25 AM »

I had a novice call of N4YVX way back ... early 70's at least.

This was no ssb CW only Novice. There was a power limit too but I forget what it was.
Logged
W8JX
Member

Posts: 5486




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: May 19, 2011, 08:13:29 AM »

Power limit was 75 watts input.
Logged

--------------------------------------
Entered using a  WiFi Win 8.1 RT tablet or a Android tablet using 4G/LTE or WiFi.
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3860




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: May 19, 2011, 08:40:49 AM »

I had a novice call of N4YVX way back ... early 70's at least.

I don't think so. Maybe WN4YVX?

There has never been a time when Novices could hold 1x3 callsigns. In the early 1970s, 1x3s beginning with N weren't issued to US hams.

This was no ssb CW only Novice. There was a power limit too but I forget what it was.

Until the mid-1970s the Novice power limit was 75 watts DC input. Sometime in the 1970s it became 250 watts DC input. There was also a crystal-control requirement that went away about the same time.

73 de Jim, N2EY
Logged
K7PEH
Member

Posts: 1125




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: May 19, 2011, 03:52:10 PM »


Until the mid-1970s the Novice power limit was 75 watts DC input. Sometime in the 1970s it became 250 watts DC input. There was also a crystal-control requirement that went away about the same time.

73 de Jim, N2EY

So, given the popular 6146 final typically used at the time, what would be today's equivalent rating -- maybe about 40 watts output or so?
Logged
W8JX
Member

Posts: 5486




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: May 19, 2011, 04:25:55 PM »

CW only rigs were usually Class C amplifier and could be up to 70% efficient in theory. I used a HW-16 with a 6GE5 sweep tube final as i recall. With 75 watts input on meter is would make a over 50 watts out. I remember this because early HW-16's had a design problem with 15m tank circuit and output was low on 15 (about 25 watts) A mentor ham modified it for me to get full output and I remember him checking it on his bird watt meter.
Logged

--------------------------------------
Entered using a  WiFi Win 8.1 RT tablet or a Android tablet using 4G/LTE or WiFi.
KE4JOY
Member

Posts: 1335




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: May 20, 2011, 07:06:42 AM »

I had a novice call of N4YVX way back ... early 70's at least.

I don't think so. Maybe WN4YVX?

There has never been a time when Novices could hold 1x3 callsigns. In the early 1970s, 1x3s beginning with N weren't issued to US hams.

This was no ssb CW only Novice. There was a power limit too but I forget what it was.

Until the mid-1970s the Novice power limit was 75 watts DC input. Sometime in the 1970s it became 250 watts DC input. There was also a crystal-control requirement that went away about the same time.

73 de Jim, N2EY

You are correct.. I remember the WN4 now sorry. But the N specifically stood for novice at that time.
Logged
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3860




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: May 20, 2011, 08:21:00 AM »


Until the mid-1970s the Novice power limit was 75 watts DC input. Sometime in the 1970s it became 250 watts DC input. There was also a crystal-control requirement that went away about the same time.

73 de Jim, N2EY

So, given the popular 6146 final typically used at the time, what would be today's equivalent rating -- maybe about 40 watts output or so?

Depends on the rig. In practice, a Class C final of good design running the old Novice limit of 75 watts DC input could give 50 watts or so output. An 807 could do the job very well. A few watts either way made no real difference.

But many rigs had various compromises that limited the output. Some had inefficient tank circuits, insufficient drive, poor layouts, etc. Sometimes the final was a tube chosen for it price rather than RF performance on the higher bands (6L6, some sweep tubes). Some rigs ran the final as a doubler on some bands.

And of course there were the limitations of the inexperienced operator. Tuning up a lot of rig was NOT a simple matter of tuning for maximum meter reading!

It is very important to remember that, in the USA, we hams used DC input rather than RF output until about the mid-1980s, when the rules changed. This means that when you see an old rig described by power, they mean DC input, not RF output. More than one newer ham has come to grief because they thought the rating was RF output, so they pushed the rig way beyond ratings trying to get that much out.

Back in the 1950s there was at least one Novice who made DXCC, and Novice WAS and WAC were not uncommon, even though the license was only good for a year. This was in the days of crystal control, 75 watts input, 40 full of SWBC and equipment that was a bit more challenging to operate.

73 de Jim, N2EY
Logged
W5DQ
Member

Posts: 1209


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #23 on: May 20, 2011, 03:34:41 PM »

Hello, I do not know if this means anything, but I got my first ham license in the mid 1950s. It was a novice license KN2OWK. After becoming a general the N was dropped. I think all novice license in the early years had an "N" as the second letter WN, KN, etc. This N was dropped when the next grade of license was obtained.

73s
K2OWK

I got my WN5UZU Novice call in August 1976 and got an unsolicited call change in late Sept/Oct timeframe of 1976 from the FCC. The letter stated the FCC had dropped the second letter "N" for Novice call format and I was thus issued WB5UZU automatically, still as a Novice. The official FCC letter, from Gettysburg office, about gave me a heart attack  Shocked as I had a fear of getting a FCC notice for some wrong doing that I heard horror stories about. I think I had been having my leg pulled a little too much by my Elmer back then.  Smiley

Gene W5DQ
« Last Edit: May 20, 2011, 03:37:28 PM by W5DQ » Logged

Gene W5DQ
Ridgecrest, CA - DM15dp
www.radioroom.org
N0ZNA
Member

Posts: 115




Ignore
« Reply #24 on: May 21, 2011, 08:40:46 PM »

got my call in 1993,i was a CODE-tech...was a CODE-tech till last year and took gen and am going for extra.Was very happy as a tech,and never wanted to upgrade.Stayed on 10 and 6 all-mode and had fun.I have kept my n0zna call and wont change it.My Father took his lic test in 1972 before the fcc and was given wn0lcx,took his advanced test and they swapped the n for a b...wb0lcx...73s de n0zna/John em48sd
Logged
KB0OXD
Member

Posts: 31


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #25 on: May 23, 2011, 12:58:11 AM »

It runs in my mind mid 80's. My wife got a N no code tech call in late 80's.
Impossible.  The No-Code tech license only came out in the early 1990s (I know because I was in on it)

Are you sure you aren't somehow mixing that up with the old skool Novice license?

Cheers & 73 Cheesy

Pat Cook, KB0OXD
Englewood, CO
WEBSITE | TWITTER ME |

LIVE STREAMING WEBCAM


CLICK HERE FOR OTHER HAMS WITH LIVE STREAMING WEBCAMS

--

You actually HIT the repeater??  NO WONDER THE THING IS ALWAYS DOWN WHENEVER I WANNA USE IT!!! 

Ohh...I get it now.  When you say you Hit the repeater, you mean you are Talking To Other Hams Through

It
!!!  *DOH!*
Logged

Pat Cook, KB0OXD
Englewood, CO
WEBSITE | TWITTER | FACEBOOK | APRS TRACKER
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3860




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: May 23, 2011, 08:34:00 AM »

It runs in my mind mid 80's. My wife got a N no code tech call in late 80's.
Impossible.  The No-Code tech license only came out in the early 1990s

The Technician lost its code test on Feb 14, 1991.

For a time, there were Technicians who had passed 5 wpm code, and had HF privileges, and Techs who hadn't, and didn't. About 1994 FCC created the Technician Plus to differentiate between the two groups.

73 de Jim, N2EY
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!