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Author Topic: Meaning of Di-di-di-dah-dit  (Read 2586 times)
VK5EEE
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Posts: 271




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« on: March 16, 2016, 03:35:25 AM »

A most unspecific character in "Morse Code" is the di-di-di-dah-dit. It's a nice character that can be used in a number of ways. How do you use it? Please note to all posting in this thread, there is no right and wrong way of using di-di-di-dah-dit, so we can only speak of our own usage and experiences with it.

In Germany (perhaps a few other places, services or at a certain era) it may have been used as "VErstanden" = understood. But certainly since I've been active in the 1970's onwards, it has not generally been used in that way. From my experience:

* As a sort of "throat clearing" or "ahem" -- at the start of a transmission, or when thinking of what to say next.

In Japanese "Wabun" CW it means "switching to International Morse Code" (the opposite is dah-di-di-dah-dah-dah which is "switching to Japanese Wabun Code").

How to you THINK of it if you had to write it down, would you think of it as <SN> or as <VE> ? I think of it as <SN>. Just like with <SK> or <VA> the same thing, some think of it as SK others as VA.

Do you use <SN> at all? I find I use it from time to time, even occasionally to correct an error, in fact I use multiple ways to correct errors depending on QSO, speed and mood: II, E E, 8 dits, or E E E E, or ? or <SN> so I clearly have no single way of correcting my errors HIHI. Again there is no right or wrong way to correct an error, II means "I repeat" 8 dits is official, but usually even 2 or more E E suffice when left with a space between.
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Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever
KE6EE
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« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2016, 11:48:19 AM »

I hear SN on rare occasions but have never used it.

I like its sound and if I think about it as a kind of interrupter not unlike BT maybe I can find some uses for it to liven up my rhythm.

One explanation for SN in English is "sho' 'nuff."   Grin
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VK5EEE
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« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2016, 06:12:55 PM »

 Grin Great one KE6EE, good possible equivalent of SN!  Grin
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Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever
ZL1BBW
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« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2016, 12:22:58 AM »


I always understood it meant oops, or the equivalent.
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ex MN Radio Officer, Portishead Radio GKA, BT Radio Amateur Morse Tester.  Licensed as G3YCP ZL1DAB, now taken over my father (sk) call as ZL1BBW.
VK5EEE
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Posts: 271




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« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2016, 04:55:49 AM »


I always understood it meant oops, or the equivalent.
Agree, it's very versatile. Sometimes it's used as "oops" other times as "ahem" (as in clearing the throat to say something, i.e. the starting signal, not a dah-di-dah-di-dah though), other times as a filler... I think it's the only character that doesn't have any clear meaning, but has come to mean any/all of those things.
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Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever
JS6TMW
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« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2016, 05:03:15 AM »

"I'm trying to think of something to say.
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K3STX
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« Reply #6 on: March 18, 2016, 05:18:17 AM »

I do it a couple of times before I send to remind myself of the speed of the dits on my bug. I did not know it was ever used for anything else.

paul
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N4OI
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« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2016, 05:18:38 AM »

It's the prefix to a Canadian call sign...

73  Grin
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VK5EEE
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« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2016, 05:28:24 AM »

 Grin
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Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever
VK5EEE
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« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2016, 05:54:11 AM »

I do it a couple of times before I send to remind myself of the speed of the dits on my bug.
Ha I do that too OM, also on electronic keyer, to see if it's at 40WPM or 20WPM, the ultra pico keyer it's very hard to see setting! Amazing how many uses ...-. has  Cheesy
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Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever
K3STX
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Posts: 1360




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« Reply #10 on: March 18, 2016, 07:48:49 AM »

I do it a couple of times before I send to remind myself of the speed of the dits on my bug.
Ha I do that too OM, also on electronic keyer, to see if it's at 40WPM or 20WPM, the ultra pico keyer it's very hard to see setting! Amazing how many uses ...-. has  Cheesy

I put a giant knob from a 1920s radio on my pico-keyer "knob" (the pico-keyer knob is essentially a shaft). Much easier to turn and easy to tell speed.

p
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VK5EEE
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Posts: 271




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« Reply #11 on: March 18, 2016, 07:52:14 AM »

I put a giant knob from a 1920s radio on my pico-keyer "knob" (the pico-keyer knob is essentially a shaft). Much easier to turn and easy to tell speed.

p
Grin I'd love to see that, well done. If I look at it carefully I can see the notch in the small "shaft" but hitting key with SN (or VE for the Canadians  Cheesy) is faster.
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Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever
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