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Author Topic: 60th Anniversary of the Novice License  (Read 5455 times)
W5ESE
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« on: July 01, 2011, 12:50:23 PM »

On July 1, 1951, the Novice license first became available. Congratulations to the hundreds of thousands of amateurs who joined the hobby as Novices.

For an interesting saga of the rise and fall of the Novice license visit the Novice Historical Society at:

http://www.novicehistory.org/

73
Scott W5ESE
ex-WN5RMQ
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W3LK
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« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2011, 02:16:47 PM »

Hear! Hear!

73,

Lon - W3LK - ex KN4ZQG*
Naugatuck, Connecticut

*Issued 1961, one-year - non-renewable.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2011, 03:03:47 PM by W3LK » Logged

A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
N2EY
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« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2011, 02:23:06 PM »

Thanks for the reminder!

It should also be remembered that the same 1951 restructuring that gave us the Novice also gave us the Technician and Extra class licensess, and renamed the existing ABC classes as Advanced, General and Conditional.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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AD6KA
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« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2011, 06:52:42 PM »

Some of the best times I had in ham radio was as a Novice.
I had a beat up HW101 and my very first antenna was an 80m/40m
doublet made from "unzipped" cheap Radio Shack speaker wire and mounted
about 5 feet above the roof of our apartment building. (Seriously, the whole thing).
It was held up by 6 foot lengths of 1/2" PVC pipe clamped onto bathroom vent pipes!
(Had to sneak up there to do that of course)
Of course we only had CW, and my straight key was one of those Ameco
$5 pot metal jobs with the plastic base, which I glued to a piece of wood.

The first time I tried tuning up those 6146's into that antenna,
my wife came running into the room and said "Our (electric) garage door
is going up and down, and so are the neighbor's on both sides!"  Grin

A couple counterpoises fixed that, and DX for me then was another
state, but I was having too much fun to care that I had a crappy setup!
73, Ken  AD6KA
« Last Edit: July 04, 2011, 06:58:44 PM by AD6KA » Logged
N3DF
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« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2011, 09:43:40 AM »

"Real" Novices ran 75 watts input, crystal-controlled. 
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Neil N3DF
AE4RV
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« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2011, 10:27:53 AM »

Was never a Novice but I do refer to a time early on as my "Novice period".

Shortly after rising from SWL to Extra in 1996, a local VE whom I had impressed by passing the 13WPM test at my first session (Tech+) was kind enough to loan me an MFJ 20M QRP CW rig. I was more of a beggar than a chooser back then so I graciously accepted the little rig. It put out 2 - 3 watts in to a dipole that someone else helped me build. CW-only and (very) low power is why I call it my Novice period, and I remember it fondly. I got as far as California and still have that QSL card. I used a straight key from Radio Shack that I purchased in the eighth grade as a novelty - I didn't think that I would ever actually transmit with it.

I hope I haven't offended any of you Real Novices out there with my little story. I still run mostly low power CW but only relatively recently ditched straight keys and started chasing DX. A late bloomer for sure.

Geoff

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K2OWK
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« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2011, 12:36:04 PM »

Remember that 75 watts was input not output power.

73s
K2OWK
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KC8Y
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« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2011, 04:48:13 PM »

Got the novice ticket WN8CXC in 1968 (was only good for 2-yrs-THEN)...So got tech (after only 1-yr of novice) didn't want to loose call so became WB8CXC...got advanced in 1973, tired of call back then...Became extra KC8Y about 12-yrs ago...In my novice years had the best times...ALL-IN-ALL love this hobby Smiley
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N4KZ
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« Reply #8 on: July 18, 2011, 01:07:20 PM »

Yep, my novice period from Feb. 1969 to September of that year when I upgraded to general class was a magical time in my 42 years of ham radio. The wonder and amazement of it all -- my first QSO was on 80 meters with someone in Connecticut - I was too nervous to copy much of his transmissions - to working my first DX station on 15 meters - a ZD8 - and the several QSOs with a ZL named Matt who'd transmit on SSB in the 15 meter novice band while working us novices who were toiling away on CW. My novice call was WN4MEN so I delighted when I worked WN6EGG and he sent me a QSL with the word EGG cut out from an egg carton and pasted on the card. And I was thrilled to work another novice on 15 meters who was in the Air Force at Ramey AFB in Puerto Rico and discovering he was from my small hometown in Kentucky. What a weird coincidence that was!

My novice station consisted of a Heath DX-100 that I bought used from AES. Ray, K9KHW, took my phone order. My receiver was a National NC-98 that I bought from my local Elmer. A couple years later I sold the NC-98 at a hamfest in Kentucky and unloaded - literally - the DX-100 at an Indiana hamfest right after college. So image my surprise in September 2009 when I was walking through the flea market at the Louisville, Ky. hamfest and found my original NC-98 for sale. Not one like it. The ACTUAL receiver that I had owned and used during my novice days. I bought it back, of course, and now it sits proudly once again in my ham shack. But wait, there's more! That same evening, I got on 2 meter SSB to work a little in the ARRL VHF contest and who did I work but Ray, K9KHW, in Milwaukee - the same guy who sold me my novice transmitter.

What are the odds of buying back my original novice receiver AND working on the air the guy who sold me my original novice transmitter and all on the same day!??

Yep, the novice license was a magical time for me.

73, Dave, N4KZ
ex-WN4MEN, WB4MEN, WB9LHS, WB8TOB, KJ8S and WE4K

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KD8IWZ
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« Reply #9 on: July 22, 2011, 04:51:06 PM »

You have brought back many memories, most fondly working the Novice Round-up back in '85, as WN8NNU, my faithful HW-101 (of which I was the 3rd proud owner) into a 40M sloping dipole, squeezed into the laundry room along with the hot water tank. That was my 1st attempt at contesting  and also worked my 1st dx, Ivan, KP4FI, wow, I was a big gun back in those days ! Them was the good ole days


Thanks for helping me remember where I came from

73  Dale
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K2OWK
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« Reply #10 on: July 22, 2011, 05:57:53 PM »

Good memories. Operated out of New York with a Heathkit DX-35 transmitter and a Helicrafter S-107 receiver. Did not make to many contacts, but sure had fun as KN2OWK.

73s
K2OWK
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N8DV
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« Reply #11 on: July 23, 2011, 09:09:07 AM »

Thank you for the reminder. I am one of those. I then upgraded to tech, general, advanced all at the FCC offices! No VE's sessions back then. Finally, upgraded to extra in 2000 just before the stroke of midnight and the 20 wpm code requirement expired. I passed the code test at 11:59 pm and made extra at 12:00 sharp.  I still have my first license.
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N2UGB
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« Reply #12 on: July 24, 2011, 07:15:07 AM »

Novice in 1979 for about a year. Most fun I ever had in amateur radio. Great way way to build up cw speed. Nice portion of 15/40/80 meter cw bands available to work fellow Novices. As code speed improved to 13 wpm the General class beckoned , then passed and working the big-boys began. Now 5 wpm operators, with good intentions, must  hope to find a sympathetic cw operator to engage with in a prolonged conversation. On the old Novice frequencies everyone was everyone else's friend and equal. And patience was the rule.
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K7NNG
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« Reply #13 on: July 24, 2011, 10:23:35 AM »

I started as KN6FTH and had a blast.
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