Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Ranger 2995DX  (Read 4572 times)
KK4CPH
Member

Posts: 154




Ignore
« on: July 10, 2011, 08:16:27 PM »

I picked up this unit about 2 weeks ago and finally got an antenna for it.  The antenna is a dipole and I put it in the attic.   (The only place I could put it outside would be from my house to a tree but unfortunately, the power lines are there)  Anyhow, I downloaded the owners manual but it doesn't tell me much.  What I'm trying to figure out is what mode to be in.  My choices are FM/AM/USB/LSB/CW.  Today I was scanning and found an active frequency but had a tough time understanding what they were saying.  I could only understand them when I set it at CW.  In the other modes it sounded distorted and garbled.  So what am I missing?   Huh
Also found it interesting that I could hear the guy in FL and the one in NY but couldn't hear the one in NC... and I'm in Eastern TN!

Eric
KK4CPH
Logged
WB6BYU
Member

Posts: 13343




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2011, 09:11:32 PM »

This is a 10m rig, right?  Conditions are like that - short range stations are often much more difficult
to work than more distant ones due to the vertical angles at which signals bounce off the ionosphere.

If you are operating voice on the 10m band, you'll want to use USB.  True, there is some AM operation
up around 28.8 MHz or so IIRC, but the vast majority of voice work will be USB.  When you hear a signal
you have to tune it in very carefully until you can understand what they are saying, then tweak it a
bit more until the voices sound like a natural pitch.  At that point, when you transmit you should be
on their frequency.

(I'm not familiar with that particular rig - some of the Ranger rigs are really designed for illegal CB use
and may have features such as channelization that make them difficult to use conveniently on the
ham bands.)

FM voice is used above 29.510 MHz, with a calling frequency on 29.600 MHz and some repeaters
around the country.  It can be interesting when the band opens.

While CW can be used on any frequency, most QSOs are at the bottom of the band between
28.0 to 28.1 MHz.  You'll need to be able to send and copy Morse code.
Logged
K2DC
Member

Posts: 1375


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2011, 11:15:33 PM »

Eric,

   Your Technician Class license only allows you to operate CW from 28.000 to 28.300 and USB from 28.300 to 28.500 at a maximum od 200W, but you should already know that.

73,

Don, K2DC

« Last Edit: July 11, 2011, 02:20:28 AM by K2DC » Logged
KE4ILG
Member

Posts: 150




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2011, 07:52:13 AM »

The most direct answer I have, you should have been able to get a clear copy using usb setting on your radio.  If it did not work then the radio might not be working properly.  As previously stated these rigs are used by cb'ers to get more output power than allowed.  The previous owner may have opened the radio and attempted to increase the power or something and damaged it.  That may be why you got it, the last owner wanted to get rid of a broken radio.

My best advice is to locate a local ham/ham club.  You could use a local Elmer. Your questions could be easily answered in person in my shack.  Also go back and re-read some of the Tech. study material.  Sometimes just passing the exam does not mean you understand it.  Once you start using the knowledge the study material may make more sense.  Also perhaps start studying for your General it will help you learn more. Make certain you stay within the frequencies you are authorized. Fortunately most of the activity on ten meters is in the Tech area.
 
Don k2dc and wb6byu both have given great advise.  I hope you listen to them
 
I have no experience with you radio but as stated before they are used by cb folks to exceed the power limits of legal cb radios.  This does not make it a great radio in my mind.  Start reading the used forsale on this  and the qrz.com web sites.  You can also read reviews of ham gear on this site. I think you can find  a very good used hf rig in the $350-$500 range that could serve you for many years.  The additional advantage is one of those rigs will work on all the hf bands not just 10 meters.

Don't give up you are just at the beginning.  73, Mike ke4ilg
 

Logged
KK4CPH
Member

Posts: 154




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2011, 09:10:40 AM »

Thanks all for the replies.  I've seen plenty of the Ranger 10m mobile units and I've been told to avoid them.  But this unit is a rack mounted 10/12 meter that I bought while passing thru Ohio from another ham.  The only thing I've noticed is that the security seal is off.  Maybe to install the optional CTCSS.  There's 3 pages in the owners manual on how to do an alignment, but I don't know if that needs to be done or if that's routine maintenance on these.  There's a hamfest coming up at the end of the month near Asheville so maybe I'll take it over there and enlist the help of an elmer.  I know my operating range is limited and I've heard more activity above 29.5 so more incentive for me to upgrade to General..... and maybe learn CW!   Smiley

Eric
KK4CPH
Logged
N4KZ
Member

Posts: 599




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2011, 10:53:23 AM »

Eric,

Welcome to 10-meter propagation. You will notice that you can regularly hear hams hundreds or thousands of miles away while someone as close to your Tennessee QTH as North Carolina is actually far too close to hear. Their signal is skipping over you. Ten meters is good for local communications -- out to 30 miles or so -- or good for long distance communications. But when signals are in-between those distances, you probably won't hear them. That's normal.

It sounds like your Ranger rig actually uses upper sideband in the CW position. That's not unusual and that's why you could copy some signals while the rig was in CW mode. On lower sideband, they are unintelligible because they were transmitting on upper sideband, which is normal for 10 meters and all the ham HF bands on 20 meters and above.

Welcome to ham radio. And like some of the others said, the Ranger is not the best pick for a ham rig. For what it cost, you probably could have bought a used HF all-band HF rig which would be far more useful -- particularly after you upgrade to general class.

73 and good luck,
Dave, N4KZ
Logged
WA3SKN
Member

Posts: 5497




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2011, 11:03:26 AM »

10 Meters is a daytime band.  As a tech, you can work CW and data modes between 28.0---28.3 Mhz.... and SSB (you will want to use USB) between 28.3---28.5 Mhz.
10 Meters is starting to open up, and you CAN work stations with 25 watts. Start with a dipole, 8 ft 3 in per side fed with coax and mounted as high as practical.
Hopefully, no one has "modified" your rig and everything is set properly.
Yes, the band was open this last weekend!
73s.

-Mike.
Logged
KK4CPH
Member

Posts: 154




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2011, 11:22:29 AM »

Start with a dipole, 8 ft 3 in per side fed with coax and mounted as high as practical.
Hopefully, no one has "modified" your rig and everything is set properly.
Yes, the band was open this last weekend!
73s.

-Mike.

That's what I have... a 16ft dipole with a balun.  Don't know the rig has been tampered with.  Think I'll have someone look at it.


And like some of the others said, the Ranger is not the best pick for a ham rig. For what it cost, you probably could have bought a used HF all-band HF rig which would be far more useful -- particularly after you upgrade to general class.

73 and good luck,
Dave, N4KZ

Sigh.... live and learn.  I only paid $360 for it so I thought it was a deal since all the other ones (2995DX) were going anywhere up to $600.  Wouldn't be the first time I've found out the hard way... probably won't be the last.   Grin
I sat here listening to it and was able to adjust it so I could here the person clearly.  They were on 28.400 (I heard him tell the other guy this) but I had to tune up to 28.4002 and turn the clarifier half-way to the left, but it was real clear.  So maybe I need to calibrate the radio?  Or maybe I should just sell it and get a good unit?  If I do sell it, what do you all recommend for a good 10m receiver?  I don't need a mobile.  Like maybe a nice Yaesu FT-101?
BTW: Found this about 10m for a newbie:
http://www.hamuniverse.com/10meterinformation.html

Eric
KK4CPH
Logged
KD8GEH
Member

Posts: 470




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2011, 11:57:58 AM »

Amen on that! Cool looking CB!

I say flea bay it and buy a nice second hand transistor rig in your budget. Once you listen to the real HF, you will be soon going for your general or extra (I sure was).

You will most likely need a antenna tuner as well so figure that in too. My first rig was a Kenwood TS-430S with the matching tuner and supply. So far I have not been able to let loose of her. Now running a TS-950SD  Grin

Some suggestions: TS-430, Icom 718, Yeasu 757 or the like. The 101's have tube finals so you will need to dip the plate on them. Take a look at the classifieds and reviews here on E-ham, that will help you make a decision. Also like noted, seek out local ham club, should be lots of guys willing to help you.

73,  Dave KD8GEH

Logged
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 4731




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2011, 12:51:43 PM »

Except for the 101ZD, the finals are sweep tubes, so not too easy to get.....
Logged
KB5ZXM
Member

Posts: 214




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: July 13, 2011, 12:24:31 PM »

I had real good luck with a home made Jpole, easy to hide, or pull up or down with a string.
Logged
KK4CPH
Member

Posts: 154




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: July 17, 2011, 11:39:39 AM »

You all were right.  I've been looking and see I could have bought an Icom IC-735 for about the same as the Ranger.... AND have more bands!  Angry  The IC-735 has good reviews so I'm leaning towards it.  Are there any issues with Icom that I should be aware of? (such as any "common" fail points?)

Eric
KK4CPH
Logged
KE4ILG
Member

Posts: 150




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: July 17, 2011, 02:45:00 PM »

I have owned an ic 730 and ic 706 both use a special icom power connector.  I feel certain that the   ic 735 also requires that power connector.  So make sure that the power cord is included in the deal.  All I have heard about the ic 735 has been positive.  All radios have a weak link but I don't believe the ic 735 is worse than others.  If possible buying from a local ham would give you the opportunity to test it out and learn how the controls are to be operated.  I'm not saying that buying online is a bad idea just a local purchase has advantages.  73 Mike ke4ilg
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!