Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Learning Cw  (Read 1593 times)
KC2IFH
Member

Posts: 20




Ignore
« on: July 17, 2001, 04:22:08 PM »

Hi.
I was wondering what is the best way to learn CW.  I just got my Tech ticket and would like to upgrade.  So i was wondering if tapes or a computer program would be better to learn CW with.
73's
Alex
KC2IFH
Logged
Guest

« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2001, 09:07:36 PM »

hi alex,

arrl has the code transmissions over the air
or on the www site in real audio format
for live or downloading to listen to later.

some say the code quick worked for them,
others used supermorse on a dos pc.

bottom line is to get 30 min a day to learn
a few letters at a time and then start listening
on the air so you can learn more to pass the test.

then get on the air and call cq.

Logged
KA1DBE
Member

Posts: 122




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2001, 10:18:04 AM »

I use a little dos program called CP. (code practice)  It is simple to use and works on any machine.  (I can't verify WIN-me and W2K)  Also, a good trick that I do is listen to code on tape while driving to work. ( I have a 30 minute drive ).  EVERYDAY is the important thing.  Good luck and hope to see you down on HF.

Best 73s,

Jeff, KA1DBE/4
Logged
KB3CDF
Member

Posts: 27


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #3 on: July 18, 2001, 10:46:53 AM »

Howdy:

I used NUMorse.  There is also a counterpart software package that contains all test questions and "creates" random tests. However,  this may not be needed because there are several "Free" websites that provide this.

The software is downloaded and immediate access is granted in a limited fashion (5 wpm or so). A registration can be paid which buys "password access" to the rest of the program (50 wpm). There are many other ways for sure.  This afforded full spectrum learning; ie. sight, sound, & touch.  

As previously stated, daily periods of study will work best. I recommend 10 minutes in the morning and evening.  Do "Three-A-Days", if you ever played sports.

Other suggestions:
Send a paragraph or two of the newspaper to yourself with a practice key after you have the basic sounds of each letter down.

If you have access to an HF reciever,  listen/copy to actual QSOs in morse.  Copy even in noisy conditions will help you test: (a.) you will learn the basic format of a QSO (b.) the noise on the reception will help you copy even when a fellow tester is sitting next to you sneezing his/her brains out ('don't ask.).

Once licensed, join FISTS and get a code buddy to RAG Chew code (www.fists.org). $10 ... no biggie.  I think you can ask for a code buddy even without joining.  'contact me to set up a schedule, if you want.  I am not a PRO, but I enjoy it and will help you.
Logged
HFHAM
Member

Posts: 1




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2001, 08:58:02 PM »

I tried a number of methods (including Koch) and got bored or frustrated with them. Then I tried Code Quick 2000 (http://www.cq2k.com). This has to be the easiest way to learn the code and I think absolutely anyone could learn with this method. Not cheap, but well worth the money. I am now a 20+ wpm extra and I got there from virtually 0 wpm using Code Quick 2000.
Logged
KD5MAW
Member

Posts: 75




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2001, 11:59:59 AM »

It seems to me that learning code is more a matter of having the motivation to practice REGULARLY than anything else. I wasn't impressed with any of the "gimmicky" solutions, so I downloaded a boatload of free audio files from http://www.aa9pw.com/radio/exam.html and practiced with them daily until I could copy 100% at 7wpm. This small amount of extra speed made taking element one pretty much strain free. I'm still using the code files from this site to increase speed. Your results may differ.
Logged
N8IK
Member

Posts: 64


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: July 30, 2001, 12:51:49 PM »

The common theme here is 30 minutes every day - worked for me too.  I used SuperMorse.  Also read http://www.qsl.net/n9bor/n0hff.htm  - great stuff.

73 de Ian
Logged
N9BOR
Member

Posts: 16




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2001, 05:19:58 PM »

You learn Morse code by practicing. Please don't take this the wrong way, but understand that you don't learn the code by talking about learning the code. Ideally you should find a tutor that regularly operates CW and has experience teaching. If that is not possible, the ARRL offers an inexpensive CD or audio tape that will introduce each character to you and provide practice. I do not recommend that you use "systems" that teach you to associate a character's sound to a phrase. This creates a two step process, which limits you when you desire to increase your speed. You will have to go from "dah di dit," to "dog did it" and then finally to "D." I suggest that you learn the code, so that you immediately recognize "dah di dit" as the letter "D. Finally, after you learn the code well enough to pass the 5-wpm test, I suggest you immediately get on the air and use your new skill. Your speed will dramatically increase by having QSOs with other hams and it will be FUN! GL
Logged
KC7YRN
Member

Posts: 161




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: September 21, 2001, 12:17:47 PM »

I'd like to hear opinions about a technique I've seen advocated.

The idea is to skip low-speed practice altogether and start around 20 wpm but with a limited vocabulary, like a couple of characters at first. After you can copy most of a minute of random sending accurately, you gradually add more letters and numbers into the mix.

Of course to make this work you need either a live instructor or a program like NuMorse that will randomize from a specified set of characters.

Seems to me like you'd want to supplement this by listening to entire words so as to get used to the sound of "RST", "QSY", "QRM" and so on.

73 de KC7YRN
Logged
AG4DG
Member

Posts: 537


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #9 on: September 22, 2001, 02:48:30 PM »

<I>The idea is to skip low-speed practice altogether and start around 20 wpm but with a limited vocabulary, like a couple of characters at first. After you can copy most of a minute of random sending accurately, you gradually add more letters and numbers into the mix. </I>

It's called the Koch method.  I tried it once, and it didn't work.  

I suggest Code Quick.  It's Morse Code training with ATTITUDE!!!  Go to:
http://www.cq2k.net/

Some people knock Code Quick, but you'll notice that none of them were Code Quick users.  You'll find in discussion forums that everyone who tried Code Quick found it worked for them.  It worked for me.

Of course, everyone is a zealous supporter of his/her own pet method of learning CW and knocks all the others.
Logged
N5XM
Member

Posts: 242




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: September 29, 2001, 11:28:00 PM »

All of the above methods work, but what always amazes me from doing CW testing for 3 years is how no one seems to have figured out that the most important thing other than knowing the characters and practicing every day, is knowing what the elements of a CW QSO are. What do Hams talk about when they have a QSO? Calls, names, locations, signal reports, kinds of radios and what kind of antenna how high, how much power, the weather at your location, what kind of work you do, the temperature, how long you've been a Ham, why you have to QRT, thanks, and calls again. The rest is just fill.  If you can get a clue about this, you will make it much easier on yourself in anticipating what is coming. After you pass your test and are ready to get on the air, at first it helps to even write these things down, so you don't flip out when you freeze up, and you will for the first month or so. If you know the elements of a QSO, and learn how to anticipate them, and you must learn to recognize the prosigns, because they tell you what is coming next, then you can relax and just copy. First things first.
Logged
N5XM
Member

Posts: 242




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: September 29, 2001, 11:30:30 PM »

All of the above methods work, but what always amazes me from doing CW testing for 3 years is how no one seems to have figured out that the most important thing other than knowing the characters and practicing every day, is knowing what the elements of a CW QSO are. What do Hams talk about when they have a QSO? Calls, names, locations, signal reports, kinds of radios and what kind of antenna how high, how much power, the weather at your location, what kind of work you do, the temperature, how long you've been a Ham, why you have to QRT, thanks, and calls again. The rest is just fill.  If you can get a clue about this, you will make it much easier on yourself in anticipating what is coming. After you pass your test and are ready to get on the air, at first it helps to even write these things down, so you don't flip out when you freeze up, and you will for the first month or so. If you know the elements of a QSO, and learn how to anticipate them, and you must learn to recognize the prosigns, because they tell you what is coming next, then you can relax and just copy. First things first.
Logged
KG4FNG
Member

Posts: 1


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #12 on: October 06, 2001, 03:38:50 AM »

Here is a very good web site for learning morse code
  its the way I learned it. www.aa9pw.com click on amatuer radio link then click morse code link. with this you can start out with a few letters at a time, you can adjust the fansworth and the speed. You just
download a wav file,copy as much as you can and then click on the link to check copy
Logged
KB1HJW
Member

Posts: 70




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: November 07, 2001, 09:36:31 AM »

I'm in the exact same boat as you, just got my call sign yesterday. I've been studying for both the General test and the code test since I passed the Tech test. I downloaded a bunch of the free programs and wasn't getting anywhere with them. I finally bit the bullet and bought CodeQuick. I absolutely love it. As mentioned, a half hour a day is ideal (whether split into one, two or three sessions). Don't do more, you'll get overloaded, don't do less, you won't progress.
My suggestion is to to work on accuracy first, then speed (this is the theory in any sport, and specifically what we teach in competitive shooting). It is much easier to increase your speed when you are getting all letters. I'm getting 100% accuracy, although I'm only at 2wpm. Good luck, and don't give up when it gets a little difficult.
Logged
DJ9AO
Member

Posts: 8




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: November 21, 2001, 02:31:17 AM »

I would advise one of the PC-Software. Speed can be adjusted in a wide range, you don't hear the same thing two times and if you choose one where you can also use a key together with the PC it's nearly perfect. I learned CW with CWT 1.75 (available in German only, sri), but you may find similar software.

73 Oliver DJ9AO
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!