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Author Topic: High location  (Read 1618 times)
KF6DBZ
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« on: July 15, 2011, 08:25:08 AM »

I live in the Redondo beach area and i was thinking of going to a place like Mount wilson to use the Ham radio. Does anybody have a good location to go that is like mount wilson?
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K0BG
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« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2011, 11:55:12 AM »

Height helps if you're operating VHF or UHF. Doesn't do much for HF, but a clear horizon sure does.

And yes, as I used to live in Colorado. Operated from the top of Pikes Peak several times.
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KW6LA
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« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2011, 06:53:20 PM »

Summit of Mount Pinos; view from the east-southeast
Elevation 8,847 ft (2,697 m) NAVD 88[1]
Prominence 4,800 ft (1,463 m)
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2011, 08:46:33 AM »

Summit of Mount Pinos; view from the east-southeast
Elevation 8,847 ft (2,697 m) NAVD 88[1]
Prominence 4,800 ft (1,463 m)

Problem with Pinos is you cannot drive to its summit.  The parking lot is high, but it's way below the "top," which has no drivable road.

Now, you can drive to the actual summit of Frazier Peak, which is miles closer to I-5.  It's 6 miles up a mostly dirt road but it's drivable and I was just up there in mid-June for the VHF contest.  It summit is 8,013' a.s.l., not quite as high as Pinos but easier access and still very clear.

I wouldn't recommend the Mt. Wilson "tower ridge" because there are a hundred broadcast towers up there and a ton of interference.  Of course, there are other scenic pullouts, or down by the observatory.

From Redondo Beach there are much closer places that aren't nearly as high but still very good for mobile hamming.  One is "Signal Hill," just off the 405.  It's only a few hundred feet higher than its surroundings, but is very "clear" and a good radio location.  A better one that's a bit longer drive is the summit of the Palos Verdes peninsula in PVE or RHE.  Top of that hill is about 1800 feet and of course it's surrounded by ocean on three sides.  You end up parking on a street in a residential area, but that's legal.

Another good spot that's much closer than Frazier or Pinos, and a less tiring drive than getting up to Mt. Wilson, is Saddle Peak.  The summit is 2,830' and it's only a 10-minute or so drive off the 101 Freeway, accessible via Mulholland Hwy at Stunt Road.  That one's quite close to me and I've operated mobile up there dozens of times.  It's a good and pretty "quiet" spot.  There are a lot of VHF-UHF-microwave repeaters and such, but they don't bother HF gear at all.
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KQ6Q
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« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2011, 12:36:35 PM »

There's a small park on top of Signal Hill (in the middle of Long Beach, access from Cherry Ave, south of the 405 ) - popular with VHF weak signal types - great view to the horizon. A lot closer to Rendondo Beach than the top of Mt Wilson! The top of Palos Verdes is also a wonderful DX location, and even closer to you. It was W6AM's super location. Check out the book on him in the library!
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KW6LA
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« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2011, 06:19:05 PM »

Now, you can drive to the actual summit of Frazier Peak,

Steve, last time I drove up there the road was real nasty in a Chevy 4X4. Pinos is a nice drive and you can do a short easy hike to the summit with your favorite HT and it amazing ! For a cheap thrill, just find the highest parking structure you can and have fun. As Allan said, not a big deal on HF bands. 
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K0BG
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« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2011, 04:06:49 AM »

You call 8,000 feet a mountain? Heck, I can drive clear to the top of Buck mountain about 90 miles west of my home, and it's 11,200 some feet. Or try Mt. Evans in Colorado, at about 14,200. Now those are mountains!
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W8JX
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« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2011, 07:07:59 AM »

You call 8,000 feet a mountain? Heck, I can drive clear to the top of Buck mountain about 90 miles west of my home, and it's 11,200 some feet. Or try Mt. Evans in Colorado, at about 14,200. Now those are mountains!

 Well same can be said about the Himalayas and Everest and others. When you consider that the valley elevations in some parts of Colorado can be 8 to 9000 feet and more  A 12k peak s not the high relative to surroundings. Even Pikes Peak is "only" about 8000 feet above the plains to east of it and less to south, west and north terrain. It structure and height relative to its surrounding area determines what a mountain is and whether it is good for ham radio not its absolute height. 
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K0BG
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« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2011, 04:25:19 PM »

Oh! Yes! But... It is in the clear! On VHF/UHF, that is the key attribute, as if the HAAT!. HF? Doesn't make a darn bit of difference.
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W8JX
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« Reply #9 on: July 23, 2011, 06:13:18 PM »

Oh! Yes! But... It is in the clear! On VHF/UHF, that is the key attribute, as if the HAAT!. HF? Doesn't make a darn bit of difference.

I do agree but,,,  on short range HF (ground wave) it can help but, it will make little difference on the long haul.
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