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Author Topic: Which Wireless Router?  (Read 2635 times)
NT0A
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Posts: 97




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« on: July 28, 2011, 12:17:05 PM »

I have determined that the remaining RFI that permeates every HF band at my QTH is coming from my Linksys wireless router. From the many discussions on the Internet it appears that Netgear products offer the best hope for a solution, but all of the routers discussed in various articles and fourm posts are discontinued models. Netgear advises that the best choices for an HF sensitive environment are the WNDR3800(N600) OR WNDR4000(N750), but I am reluctant to shell out from $70 to $150 if it will not solve the problem.

Does anyone have experience with the current Netgear model N600/WNDR3800 or N750/WNDR4000 wireless routers? If so, I would like to know how they worked for you. If you got one to solve and existing RFI problem, did it do the job or did you need to do more such as adding toroids, etc.? If it was your first wireless router, did it introduce RFI into your shack? Etc., etc., etc.? Any information about these two products in regards to RFI would be greatly appreciated.
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WB4BYQ
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« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2011, 12:36:41 PM »

I have a Cradelpoint MBR900 with no RFI on any band with the unit in the radio room and the wall supply is a heavy unit that produces no RFI on the unit that i purchased for 105 dollars.
this is a very professional unit for home.

richard
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W8JX
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« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2011, 04:50:46 PM »

I have a WNDR3400 and have been using it for over a year and find it a very solid unit. They are about 80 bucks at WalMart. The WNDR3300 is troublesome design and to be avoided. It is discontinued but some might still be floating around.
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All posted wireless using Win 8.1 RT, a Android tablet using 4G/LTE/WiFi or Sprint Note 3.
K1CJS
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« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2011, 05:25:13 PM »

Bob,  The problem could well stem from the wall wart that powers the router.  I believe it is a 12 volt DC supply, so if you can, power it from a clean supply and see if the noise goes away.  It's worth a shot, anyway--and I solved my noise problem like that.
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NT0A
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« Reply #4 on: July 28, 2011, 05:55:34 PM »

Bob,  The problem could well stem from the wall wart that powers the router.
Thanks, Chris. From all of the negative comments on line about my particular model of Linksys wireless router, I suspect that the wall wart is not the problem, but it certainly could be. One of the first things that I did was to go through my exponentially increasing collection of wall warts in hopes of finding a 12VDC 1000mA power supply to substitute for Linksys PS, but alas I don't have one.
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K1CJS
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« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2011, 04:12:18 AM »


Thanks, Chris. From all of the negative comments on line about my particular model of Linksys wireless router, I suspect that the wall wart is not the problem, but it certainly could be. One of the first things that I did was to go through my exponentially increasing collection of wall warts in hopes of finding a 12VDC 1000mA power supply to substitute for Linksys PS, but alas I don't have one.

What I did, Bob, was to cut the cord from one of my old wall warts and wired that to a small 12V power supply.  I had an old one from my CB days that was just sitting on the shelf doing nothing.  Just be careful of the polarity!

Good luck and 73!  Chris, K1CJS
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NT0A
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« Reply #6 on: July 29, 2011, 05:53:31 AM »

What I did, Bob, was to cut the cord from one of my old wall warts and wired that to a small 12V power supply.
Great idea which requires an existing DC power supply which I do no have. Although I would love to have a nice stable multi-voltage DC power supply, it would actually be more cost effective to just buy a new router.
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K0IZ
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« Reply #7 on: July 29, 2011, 05:56:00 AM »

I have a Linksys WRT54G wireless router.  Use wireless for laptop, Ethernet for PC's.  I have the typical hash at 61Khz spacings.  Have placed ferrites on everything, including cat5 cables to very little improvement.  Problem is NOT the wall wart (transformer types are usually better than switching types).  From what I understand, the 61Khz RFI is directly caused by the Linksys,
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NT0A
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« Reply #8 on: July 29, 2011, 06:07:07 AM »

I have a Linksys WRT54G wireless router.  Use wireless for laptop, Ethernet for PC's.  I have the typical hash at 61Khz spacings.  Have placed ferrites on everything, including cat5 cables to very little improvement.  Problem is NOT the wall wart (transformer types are usually better than switching types).  From what I understand, the 61Khz RFI is directly caused by the Linksys,
That's my feeling and understanding as well. Since all of the Linksys products suffer from this malady, I am going to replace it. Apparently, Netgear has an excellent reputation with hams, but not all of their products are RFI free. I am waiting for a report from Netgear in regards to unwanted electronic emissions for their current wireless routers. Even if they say everything is clean, I'd also like some confirmation from fellow hams that the WNDR3800 and/or the WNDR4000 do not suffer from the Cisco/Linksys disease.
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AA4PB
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« Reply #9 on: July 29, 2011, 06:40:43 AM »

I use a WRT54G located in the room next to the shack and have no RFI. However, my antennas are all located about 100 feet away from the shack.
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W1AEX
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« Reply #10 on: July 29, 2011, 08:45:48 AM »

My old D-Link 4300 had a very noisy switching wall supply (across 160 meters - 75 meters) that I replaced with a linear supply to eliminate the wandering oscillations that showed up clearly on the panadapter. I am currently using a Netgear WNR3500L which came with a switching wall supply that appears to be completely suppressed for EMI/RFI. It doesn't bother my receivers and I don't bother it even when running full legal limit.

Rob W1AEX
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