Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: What's good to do?  (Read 2466 times)
AA4HA
Member

Posts: 1377




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: July 19, 2011, 12:53:40 PM »

As you originally mentioned about your wife having an interest in you keeping in contact (tracked somewhat), you should look at an APRS unit for your vehicle. It operates in the 2 meter band and sends positional data and small data status packets. Your wife could even use it to sort of get an idea of where you were at during the last successful packet transmission.

Places like aprs.fi have maps that allow anyone to look up APRS locations for sites that are reporting in. There are even some decent low powered APRS devices that can almost be passive in your vehicle, just sending information every 10-15-20 minutes. All legal, all legit, all within the license class of a technician.

If you took any old 2 meter radio most of them could support an external APRS packet modem. Stand-alone units are available for under $100.

Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Logged

Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
NEVBEN
Member

Posts: 43




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: July 19, 2011, 09:02:40 PM »

That is a great idea, but I was actually hoping to have her with me.  But I was looking at the commercial AVL systems which if I'm not mistaken, a lot of are based on MDC.  I'll check out APRS some more.  Thanks
Logged
KG6AF
Member

Posts: 332




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: July 20, 2011, 08:07:27 AM »

One of the perks of working with a local VE group is getting to talk to brand-new hams.  Something I've noticed in speaking with them is that there's quite a difference between the mindset of new hams now and the folks entering the hobby back when I did, in the mid 1960s.  Virtually all of my old-time cohorts seemed to pick up a common set of knowledge about what you could do with a ham radio license.  (Then again, it's not as if there was that much to know: CW, AM, SSB, and for the adventurous, RTTY.  Even FM wasn't well-established at the time.)  But some of the folks getting a ham license today seem totally unaware of the various things they can do with their ticket.

To help new hams navigate the amateur radio maze, I wrote up an FAQ that we now give to the newly licensed; it's available online at http://svve.org/newhamfaq.pdf.  See pp. 11-17 for info on the various activities available to hams.  I don't think this will help the OP, but it might be of interest to other new hams.
Logged
AE4RV
Member

Posts: 933


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #18 on: July 20, 2011, 08:26:02 AM »

One of the perks of working with a local VE group is getting to talk to brand-new hams.  Something I've noticed in speaking with them is that there's quite a difference between the mindset of new hams now and the folks entering the hobby back when I did, in the mid 1960s.  Virtually all of my old-time cohorts seemed to pick up a common set of knowledge about what you could do with a ham radio license.  (Then again, it's not as if there was that much to know: CW, AM, SSB, and for the adventurous, RTTY.  Even FM wasn't well-established at the time.)  But some of the folks getting a ham license today seem totally unaware of the various things they can do with their ticket.

To help new hams navigate the amateur radio maze, I wrote up an FAQ that we now give to the newly licensed; it's available online at http://svve.org/newhamfaq.pdf.  See pp. 11-17 for info on the various activities available to hams.  I don't think this will help the OP, but it might be of interest to other new hams.


That's an excellent PDF - may I have your permission to distribute it (unaltered) at VE sessions that I participate in?

73,
Geoff
Logged
AA4HA
Member

Posts: 1377




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: July 20, 2011, 08:36:31 AM »

That is a great idea, but I was actually hoping to have her with me.  But I was looking at the commercial AVL systems which if I'm not mistaken, a lot of are based on MDC.  I'll check out APRS some more.  Thanks

I have been looking for a new TNC for APRS as I recently purchased an FT-8900R for my car (10,6,2 meters and 70 cm). Since the FT-8900 is a dual receiver/transmitter unit with cross-band capabilities and can take a 1200 or 9600 baud connection to the radio I went looking. Here is something I found that is interesting;

http://www.crosscountrywireless.net/aprs_tnc.htm

I like it because it can also be used as an APRS digipeater, APRS node, Packet modem, etc... You can stick little text messages on the APRS packet like S.O.S. or even things that may have a personal meaning to someone who may be tracking your progress in the back country. Digital modes can work in much poorer signal conditions than voice as you only need to squeeze through a hundred milliseconds or so of data for a packet.

If you have a general class license you could always use some of the HF digital modes like ALE where there is near worldwide coverage through pilot stations (there are like a half-dozen in the US). This at least uses a standardized set of frequencies on almost every HF band that you could load into a radio and use the free software on the hflink web site to do digital data.

http://hflink.net/

There are even some HF digital modes that are intended for very low power level operations but it would be hit or miss to establish a contact. You could also go the PACTOR route and connect through some of the maritime nets that operate in the ham band.

Just think outside of the box, there are so many different modes that we have available to us that it would seldom be necessary to do something like a MARS/CAP mod on a VHF radio and then to think that you have your bases covered.

BTW, in the past I was a paramedic and had called in a Lifeflight helicopter a few times before. They had the ability to come up on just about any frequency while onboard the helicopter. Usually our dispatcher would tell them to come up on 155.055 or something similar and while they were 15-20 miles out we would start to coordinate details on a landing zone. I know that they would have the ability to get onto the ham bands if need be.

If you are really concerned about getting into a serious problem while backcountry you should consider one of those new version ELT's that operate in the UHF spectrum. They are monitored by satellite, aircraft, etc.. and can be tracked down by rescue services. There are even some HF type versions for rescuing skiers who have been trapped by avalanches (penetrates the snowpack).

Having seen the photographs of Mr. Fawcett's aircraft it was no wonder that they never heard his ELT. That aircraft was tore into tiny little pieces across the hillside. Since he did not survive the crash he never had a chance to activate the wristwatch ELT that he frequently wore.

Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Logged

Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
KG6AF
Member

Posts: 332




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: July 20, 2011, 09:18:26 AM »

That's an excellent PDF - may I have your permission to distribute it (unaltered) at VE sessions that I participate in?

Geoff, feel free to distribute it.  All I ask of anyone wanting to use it is that the Silicon Valley VE Group be identified as the source.
Logged
AE4RV
Member

Posts: 933


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #21 on: July 20, 2011, 09:24:26 AM »

That's an excellent PDF - may I have your permission to distribute it (unaltered) at VE sessions that I participate in?

Geoff, feel free to distribute it.  All I ask of anyone wanting to use it is that the Silicon Valley VE Group be identified as the source.

Great idea, thanks for permission. Unaltered it shall remain.
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!