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Author Topic: Hexx Beam Antenna - Ruggedness and survivability question  (Read 1941 times)
KD8HMB
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Posts: 138




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« on: August 04, 2011, 12:55:45 PM »

I am interested in putting up a hexx beam antenna up about 25-30 ft before the end of the year, but need to make sure it is worth my time and effort. From reading I have done, it seems that the hexx beam's weakness is mechanical failure from snow and ice loading during winter storms. The winters where I am at in Michigan are usually bad. We average 90 inches snow per season, and it's usually heavy lake-effect snow.

I am interested in hearing any experiences, good or bad, from those of you that use or have used a hexx beam in northern USA climates, before deciding.

Thanks

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K8AC
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Posts: 1465




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« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2011, 05:56:42 PM »

I'm in NC and used a HexBeam for several years.  We have severe ice storms here a couple of times per winter and the beam was subjected to a considerable ice load.  Never had a problem, even with high winds with the ice load. 

73, K8AC
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K2MK
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Posts: 389




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« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2011, 05:12:58 AM »

You might also want to ask those responding to identify which manufacturer they used. There are physical differences and possibly one brand is more survivable then another.

I've only had my Traffie 5 band up for one winter but we had two ice storms in NJ. The ice was so thick that I had to scrape it off of the guy lines on my push-up mast using a long pole. My guy anchor points were not equidistant from the mast and the mast was leaning in the direction of the longer guy lines. I say "were" because the mast eventually failed in heavy wind due to my poor guy line engineering. When the mast bent over the antenna contacted the ground and survived that encounter perfectly.

I've since corrected the guy situation. Anchor points are equidistant and 120 degrees apart. Guy length is per the manufacturers specifications.

73,
Mike K2MK
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AD1DX
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Posts: 44




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« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2011, 07:54:07 AM »

I can report that my DX Engineering Hex survived tropical storm Irene quite nicely.It is on a chimney mount.On the other hand my Hustler G-7 was not so lucky-the 40 ft of mast buckled despite being double guyed.

73 de Ceasar
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K2DC
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Posts: 1346


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« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2011, 08:40:59 AM »

Agree that there could be significant differences in survivability between manufacturers and you should check that out.  I am near Syracuse NY where we average 115" of snow a year with occasional ice storms and I'm on a bald hill nearly 900' above average terrain.  The winter winds can get pretty wicked up here.  That's why I never seriously considered a Quad, although I'd love to try one.

73,

Don, K2DC
 
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KC9JCH
Member

Posts: 29




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« Reply #5 on: September 19, 2011, 08:01:45 AM »

My hex has been up for two northern Wisconsin winters.  I am about 60 miles south of lake Superior.  Mine is mounted on a fifty foot military surplus mast with a TV tenna rotor.  Almost all parts were purchased from DX Engineering.  Shhot me an e mail, my call@arrl.net.  Great little antenna, would highly recommend.
Kc9jch
Tim
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