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Author Topic: FPV RC Planes  (Read 4491 times)
AH6OY
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Posts: 11




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« on: August 11, 2011, 10:26:31 AM »

Anybody else operating RC aircraft using ham bands?
Any help on best places for gear oriented to hams?

I'm primarily interested in long range flights. I'm not up on all the specifics and about to settle on generic items for sale. Of course this buying whats offered online is like any of us going to Sears and buying a CB instead of turning into a ham and buying ham gear. Really doesn't feel right when I already have the ham bands with longer ranges.
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KC2MHM
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Posts: 6




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« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2011, 03:32:53 PM »

I suggest you just go with the spektrum 2.4 system. they are more reliable then the old crystal ham radios. I dont think they even make them anymore. with spektrum you never have a frequency conflict. Get futaba fast and you will be able to buy cheaper receiver to add models.
http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/uh_viewitem.asp?idproduct=14300
they work well
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AH6OY
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Posts: 11




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« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2011, 02:59:42 AM »

Thanks Brian. I've been looking at the Fubata 7C. It's kind of sad most gear being stuck in the gigahertz range.
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AE4RV
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Posts: 963


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« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2011, 07:59:36 AM »

You miss big antennas and interference?
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K2OWK
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Posts: 1077




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« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2011, 01:49:12 PM »

I have been using the Spektrum DX7 since it was first introduced. I have three 7 receiver's in three different aircraft. One sport, one aerobatic and one 1/3 scale biplane. I have never had a problem with it, and recommended it.

In the days before spread spectrum was available for RC. I used 6 meters for RC. It worked well and allowed me to fly without interference from CB (before 72 MHz was available). It also allowed me to fly in crowded conditions because very few people used ham for RC. With the fully programable radios like the Spektrum and the coded output interference is a thing of the past. Just for information RC systems available on 6 meters were the Kraft, Orbit, Futaba, Bonner, Controlair and a few others. I think the only one remaining is Futaba and I would doubt that it can be had on 6 meters.

73s

K2OWK
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AH6OY
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Posts: 11




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« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2011, 04:32:43 PM »

I'm looking at having to buy the Futaba 9C since it can have a ChaniLink UHF long range system piggy backing on the back of it. The 9C is the lowest model that allows plugging in something like the Chainlink or Dragon transverters or whatever the devices do. What I really need to find out is if the UHF piggy backer still transmits spread spectrum since thats what the Futaba controllers use these days. Nothing but wrestling with it for now. All in all I would really prefer to be running SS on 6 meters since I already have a portable 6m beam. And I'm also having a hard time to find info on the Spektrum controllers sooooo I'm wrestling still yet since I don't know models I can plug long range transmitters into. I'm really prefer a software a laptop could run and use my HF gear but somebody has to see the market in it. I wish they would hurry up Smiley Seems all the software guys are stuck on logging programs which is lame while the bands are broke hehehe.
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W0FM
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Posts: 2057




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« Reply #6 on: August 15, 2011, 01:28:05 PM »

If by calling it "piggy back" or "daisy chain" you are talking about the trainer or "buddy box" capablility, the slave or "buddy box" does not (in most cases) transmit.  It just allows you to connect a cable from the experienced flyer' transmitter to your "buddy box".  He holds a switch that allows the controls on your box to fly the airplane with signals from his transmitter.  His transmitter is transmitting the signal.  If (when) you get into trouble, the experienced flyer lets go of the link button and takes over all aspects of the flight  This can easily go back-and-forth several times in the same flying period.  Great way to learn R/C flying..... and fewer pieces to pick up!   Shocked

There is no shame in the new 2.4GHz radios.  Just the opposite.  It's a great new innovation that prevents your aircraft from getting "shot down" by a fellow flyer on the same channel.

I, too, use the Spektrum DX7 radio and would have nothing else.  I'm a bit confused by your desire to have a "long range system".  It's no fun when you fly your airplane out of sight.  2.4 GHz gear can do that.  But so could the older 72 Mhz stuff if you let it.

Have fun and happy flying.

73,

Terry, WØFM
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AK7V
Member

Posts: 251




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« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2011, 01:46:12 PM »

Also, take a look at the HiTec Aurora 9 2.4GHz system.  Better than the Spektrum in my experience, and more bang-for-the-buck than Futaba.
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K2OWK
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Posts: 1077




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« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2011, 01:52:30 PM »

I am back again. If you have any thought of flying using an unmanned aircraft (RC) with a video camera and transmitter in the plane to control it out of visual sight. It is not only dangerous it is against AMA rules, and could get you into real trouble if something happens while you are not in visual sight of your aircraft. I would not do this, if this is what you have in mind. Just about all RC transmitters are fully capable of very long range control within visual limits.

73s

K2OWK
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W0FM
Member

Posts: 2057




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« Reply #9 on: August 15, 2011, 02:14:42 PM »

I guess that I guessed wrong about the "buddy box" application.  The ChaniLink Long Range UHF RC system is apparently being marketed in Europe (a ham in Denmark is very involved in the sales), and it is controversial there as well.  Seems directed at RC aircraft with on board video cameras, but a lot of the actual frequency information is just a fog.  Personally, I'll stick to US standards and keeping my airplane where I can see it.

Google "Chanilink FPV" and there are a number of websited devoted to it around the globe.  The forum chatter reminds me of the days when people sought bootlegged cable TV converter boxes on the black market.

I also doubt that this device is FCC approved for model airplane operations in this country.

73,

Terry, WØFM
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K5UNY
Member

Posts: 11




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« Reply #10 on: August 21, 2011, 10:18:03 AM »

  I am a "fan" of Airtronics. I first flew them back in the 80's in my sailplanes, and today use a 6G  2.4 radio for the same type of flying. A very solid, reliable link at loooooong distances.
  Very rarely see another Airtronics at flying events.
 
   72/73  Alex
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