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Author Topic: 3-500Z lamp base  (Read 7442 times)
WY3X
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Posts: 768




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« on: August 28, 2011, 07:47:12 AM »

Has anyone done any field testing with a 3-500Z to determine how much voltage and current it would take for the tube to emanate a soft glow from only lighting the filaments? I see from specs that for actual operation, it requires 5V at 14.6 amps, but when you do the math, that's about what a 100 watt light bulb would consume. Assuming the tube is never going to be used for it's intended purpose, and assuming you actually performed empirical testing, what voltage and amperage did you discover the tube filament lights "just enough to tell it's on". (I'm hoping to use a resistor in series with 120V line voltage and avoid having to purchase a transformer.) Yeah, I could do the math, and buy a half-dozen resistors and experiment myself, but if someone has already done this, there's no reason for me to re-invent the wheel.

Thanks & 73, -WY3X
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NO2A
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« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2011, 01:49:09 PM »

I can`t do the math but I can say from my own single 3-500z that it gives off much more heat than light. Quite honestly a 7 watt night light probably gives more light. I like the idea though,someday I`d like to retire mine that way also.
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K8AXW
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« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2011, 10:35:40 AM »

Sounds like a neat project.... at first glance.... until you throw the "No Transformer" thing into the mix.

3-500Z filament:  5.0V * 14.6A = 76W   

100W light bulb:  100W/120V = 0.83A

To run the 3-500Z on 120V, you have to drop 115V @ 14.6A in order to get the same illumination from the filament.

R=E/I

You will need a 7.88 ohm resistor.

P=I*E

The resistor will have to be a 1679W resistor.  (Consider a portable electric heater w/fan)

You will have your illumination plus something to warm your shack!
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W7SMJ
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Posts: 122




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« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2011, 03:15:32 PM »

Liberate the PS from a junked PC, adjust the voltage for your mood and call it good...
73,
Scott
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WY3X
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Posts: 768




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« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2011, 03:22:27 PM »

I can see everyone's point. Perhaps I need to learn how to cut/drill glass and install a night light socket in the middle of the grid structure. First, I need a suitable "donor tube". Shelby is next weekend, so I'll be looking....

Thanks & 73, -WY3X
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K8AXW
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« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2011, 06:40:46 PM »

You need to learn to deal with TEMPERED glass.  I tried this with an old 833A tube from the local broadcast station.  The only good news out of that experience is I didn't get cut or lose my eyes!

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WY3X
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« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2011, 10:01:32 AM »

I believe I'll take it to the local glass company and have them put a 1" hole in the center of the bottom (if they can do it). Thanks for your concern and info. I have some diamond abrasive points for my Dremel tool, and was thinking they would do the job, but then- I don't have any way to produce the 1" hole once I release the vacuum. I may just try to lose the vacuum and then have the glass company do the rest of the work.

Thanks & 73, -WY3X
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K8AXW
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« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2011, 10:44:48 AM »

Let us know how that works out for you.
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N2EY
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« Reply #8 on: August 30, 2011, 06:07:53 PM »

Just remember that even regular incandescents are hoorribly inefficient. A "100 watt" conventional incandescent converts about 2% of the electricity to light. The rest is heat. And it has a rated life of less than 1000 hours and is designed as a light bulb!

73 de Jim, N2EY
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NO2A
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« Reply #9 on: August 30, 2011, 08:43:31 PM »

Speaking of light bulbs,I always liked the incandescent type because they never bothered my eyes. Flourescent bulbs always gave me a headache. I`m hoping these newer "curly" bulbs won`t do that.......... Undecided
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N2EY
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« Reply #10 on: August 31, 2011, 05:24:51 AM »

Speaking of light bulbs,I always liked the incandescent type because they never bothered my eyes. Flourescent bulbs always gave me a headache. I`m hoping these newer "curly" bulbs won`t do that.......... Undecided

I have had good results with Compact FLourescent bulbs (CFLs) in most applications. "Regular" flourescents flicker at twice the line frequency (120 times per second for 60 Hz power), but CFLs operate up in the audio range.

However CFLs can't be used everywhere (do NOT use one in a refrigerator or oven!). If you want to use a dimmer, be sure to get a special CFL that is dimmable.

CFLs are a poor choice for some applications (closets, garage-door openers, other applications where the on time is short and the number of on-off cycles high).

A typical CFL which gives the same light as a conventional incandescent uses less than 25% of the energy. Not because the CFL is super efficient but because the incandescent is so inefficient.

LEDs are even more efficient than CFLs, but the prices are still rather high.

For applications where you really need an incandescent, look at the Philips EcoVantage bulbs. They're more efficient, last longer, and can be used anywhere a conventional incandescent is used.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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WY3X
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« Reply #11 on: August 31, 2011, 08:54:17 AM »

Quote
I have had good results with Compact FLourescent bulbs (CFLs) in most applications. "Regular" flourescents flicker at twice the line frequency (120 times per second for 60 Hz power), but CFLs operate up in the audio range.

I didn't know that, thanks for the education!

Quote
However CFLs can't be used everywhere (do NOT use one in a refrigerator or oven!). If you want to use a dimmer, be sure to get a special CFL that is dimmable.

I never thought about that- I wonder what everyone is going to do when the ban on incandescent bulbs kicks in? South Carolina is fighting it, trying to maintain the only remaining incandescent bulb manufacturer in the U.S. and "opt out" of the ban.

Quote
LEDs are even more efficient than CFLs, but the prices are still rather high.

I bought one of the new bulbs to experiment with. My wife and I installed it in a lamp in our living room, and we leave it on 24/7 because it uses so little electricity. It's been running for nearly 7 months now, with no noticeable degradation in light output.

73, -WY3X
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N2EY
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Posts: 3895




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« Reply #12 on: August 31, 2011, 09:51:04 AM »

I wonder what everyone is going to do when the ban on incandescent bulbs kicks in?

There are dimmable CFL and LED bulbs. If you don't like their prices or light, there's the Philips EcoVantage, which is a high-efficiency incandescent that meets the new regulations. Home Depot has them. a 72 watt EcoVantage gives the same light as a 100 watt conventional and lasts longer. $3 for a pack of two, but the electricity savings more than pay for the bulb.


South Carolina is fighting it, trying to maintain the only remaining incandescent bulb manufacturer in the U.S. and "opt out" of the ban.

IMHO, they would do better to retool the factory.

73 de Jim, N2EY

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K8AXW
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Posts: 3900




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« Reply #13 on: August 31, 2011, 10:19:14 AM »

Another option is doing what I'm doing.  HOARDING LIGHT BULBS!  I went through the horrible government mandated water efficient toilets..... and that is a long story, not fit to be printed here.

I'm now burning government mandated 15% ethanol in my old car even thought the manual says not to.....

I'm just getting damn sick and tired of the government dictating every aspect of my life.  My only option is to do what I can do to fight back for as long as I can and that's to hoard light bulbs.  Damn the inefficiency!  (Now you know what it's like to be a cantankerous old fart!)
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K7GLM
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Posts: 51




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« Reply #14 on: August 31, 2011, 10:21:46 AM »

I wouldn't bother with drilling in a nightlight. I would get a couple of LED's in a color range that suits your mood, use some emery cloth to rough up the diffusers a little and just hot glue them to the back side of the tube, shining up through the internal elements.

Actually, I have some antique tubes sitting on the shelf, and I might just undertake this one myself. Should be an easy ambient light for the shack and I can drive it off of the 12V supply with almost no current draw.

Thanks for getting me thinking about this!   Wink

Greg Mc
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