Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: What makes Amateur Radio "go" these days?  (Read 4498 times)
W3HKK
Member

Posts: 621




Ignore
« on: September 14, 2011, 11:11:57 AM »

What activities, modes, events,  do the most to keep  amateur radio going, or growing, or appealing?

The answer is likely a combination of things, and Im trying to see how that shakes out.  Why do we do what we do, and stay active in this hobby?  What brings in new hams?

Your thoughts please.
Logged
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3926




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2011, 02:17:00 PM »

It's really very simple.

Amateur Radio is about radio for its own sake. Radio as an end in itself, not as a means to an end. The journey more than the destination; the process more than the result. The sport, adventure and the challenge of actually doing, rather than simply getting a particular result.

This plays out in all sorts of ways, of course, but it's really what we're all about.

It's a bit like the person who runs, bikes, swims, canoes, etc., because they like doing those things, not because they have to get from A to B.

Consider baseball fans who want to watch the playoffs and the World Series on TV. 99.99% of them don't care how the game gets from the ballpark to their TV - it can be by radio, fiber, coax or any other medium. Their concern is only how much it's going to cost them and how good the picture is. The content - the games - are what matters.

Now consider the ham trying for WAS on 40 CW with QRP. The content of the QSOs is secondary; what matters primarily is making the QSOs on 40 with QRP CW (and getting the confirmations). 

Most people don't understand the concept. Not because they're dumb but because their value systems are different. Those who do understand are our target audience.

---

Some time back there was an article here on eham about something called "CQ100". It's an online simulator - people all over the world can use it to have "on line QSOs". No antenna problems, no rig, no RFI, no waiting for sunspots, etc. No license, no tests, either.

Just download the software, go online and start making "contacts". No radio at all.

Some folks don't understand the difference. Those who do are the ones who are potential hams.

Amateur Radio: Radio for its own sake.

73 de Jim, N2EY

Logged
KS2G
Member

Posts: 440




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2011, 02:52:22 PM »

There are DOZENS of aspects of Amateur Radio --  DXing, rag-chewing, contesting, satellites, EME, cw, ssb, am, digital modes, QRP, QRO, traffic handling, public service, ARES, RACES, SATERN, home-brewing, antenna building, bunny-hunting, repeaters, Echolink, IRLP, and on and on.

They ALL keep Amateur Radio going, growing and appealing!

73,
Mel - KS2G

Logged
STAYVERTICAL
Member

Posts: 875




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2011, 03:39:08 AM »

It's really very simple.

Amateur Radio is about radio for its own sake. Radio as an end in itself, not as a means to an end. The journey more than the destination; the process more than the result. The sport, adventure and the challenge of actually doing, rather than simply getting a particular result.
Amateur Radio: Radio for its own sake.

73 de Jim, N2EY

Amen Jim - you spoke a mouthful.

73s
Logged
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 4002




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2011, 10:59:26 AM »

It's really very simple.

Amateur Radio is about radio for its own sake. Radio as an end in itself, not as a means to an end. The journey more than the destination; the process more than the result. The sport, adventure and the challenge of actually doing, rather than simply getting a particular result.

This plays out in all sorts of ways, of course, but it's really what we're all about.

It's a bit like the person who runs, bikes, swims, canoes, etc., because they like doing those things, not because they have to get from A to B.

Consider baseball fans who want to watch the playoffs and the World Series on TV. 99.99% of them don't care how the game gets from the ballpark to their TV - it can be by radio, fiber, coax or any other medium. Their concern is only how much it's going to cost them and how good the picture is. The content - the games - are what matters.

Now consider the ham trying for WAS on 40 CW with QRP. The content of the QSOs is secondary; what matters primarily is making the QSOs on 40 with QRP CW (and getting the confirmations). 

Most people don't understand the concept. Not because they're dumb but because their value systems are different. Those who do understand are our target audience.

---

Some time back there was an article here on eham about something called "CQ100". It's an online simulator - people all over the world can use it to have "on line QSOs". No antenna problems, no rig, no RFI, no waiting for sunspots, etc. No license, no tests, either.

Just download the software, go online and start making "contacts". No radio at all.

Some folks don't understand the difference. Those who do are the ones who are potential hams.

Amateur Radio: Radio for its own sake.

73 de Jim, N2EY



Jim:

I've read many reasons for getting into amateur radio and I've heard and read many discussions on ham radio vs. the Internet.

Your analysis and answer to HKK is the best I've ever read!  Every ham should make a hard copy and keep it in his/her files to answer that same question whenever it comes up!

Good job!
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20666




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: September 17, 2011, 01:02:00 PM »

Ham radio is a 100 year-old (and a bit more) hobby at this point.  To me, it's like stamp collecting, coin collecting, building ships in bottles, or sailing...or many other "old" hobbies.

Even with the most modern technologies available, it's still "old" by nature, as we rely on propagation and other things beyond our control and only patience and sheer will makes it all work.

It's for geeks. Cheesy

I think anyone who is not into shortwave listening probably doesn't get it.

The "public service" aspects are admirable, but almost everyone I know who's a ham and heavily involved in public service work (emergency traffic handling, etc) really knows very little about ham radio.  That's fine, and I'm glad they do this stuff, but they could be doing the same thing on public service frequencies by joining the local police reserves, first aid squad or other organizations that have their own bands and frequencies to use.

Logged
ONAIR
Member

Posts: 1747




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: September 19, 2011, 09:30:28 PM »

   It's the magic of radio.  Either it gets you or it doesn't!  If it does, you're in for a great ride.
Logged
AA4HA
Member

Posts: 1640




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: September 21, 2011, 07:25:41 AM »

Hmm "what makes amateur radio go these days"....

ExLax   Grin
Logged

Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 4002




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: September 21, 2011, 09:56:03 AM »

No S..t Tisha !
Logged
W3HKK
Member

Posts: 621




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: September 29, 2011, 04:46:47 AM »

From the replies to date, it sounds like  consensus is that we cant put our fingers on a "Top Ten" list of reasons why people come into ham radio, or stay with it, that there are too many to mention, too many to rate, and  therefor the reason why the hobby remains popular, if not dynamically growing,  is a  blur of things.

I was hoping those involved in attracting newcomers might have a  feel for why it is that new folks come into the hobby.
ie back in the  mid to late 50's the Space Program energized a  large number of kids to  enter  HF communications. the availability of military surplus gear in piles along the sidewalks of major cities made it  relatively affordable, and the  ability to   reach The World from your own bedroom or basement made it exciting.  Heck, listening to  broadcast radio stations  like WTOP in DC, WBZ in Boston, KDKAin Pittsburgh, WSM Nashville, etc  was exciting and fun. 

But that rush of new blood is long gone, even though some of those factors remain.  I think you  have to include the  substantial  upgrading of CBers into ham radio as a major factor in recent decades.  Plus VHF/UHF technical progress to open those frontiers  to us.  Certainly the economic growth of the World has brought the majority of DX on the air, and continues to be a driving force  in most places but here.  And I m sure Ive missed  quite a few other "major" factors.
Logged
STAYVERTICAL
Member

Posts: 875




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: October 02, 2011, 02:51:21 PM »

From the replies to date, it sounds like  consensus is that we cant put our fingers on a "Top Ten" list of reasons why people come into ham radio, or stay with it, that there are too many to mention, too many to rate, and  therefor the reason why the hobby remains popular, if not dynamically growing,  is a  blur of things.

I was hoping those involved in attracting newcomers might have a  feel for why it is that new folks come into the hobby.
ie back in the  mid to late 50's the Space Program energized a  large number of kids to  enter  HF communications. the availability of military surplus gear in piles along the sidewalks of major cities made it  relatively affordable, and the  ability to   reach The World from your own bedroom or basement made it exciting.  Heck, listening to  broadcast radio stations  like WTOP in DC, WBZ in Boston, KDKAin Pittsburgh, WSM Nashville, etc  was exciting and fun.  

But that rush of new blood is long gone, even though some of those factors remain.  I think you  have to include the  substantial  upgrading of CBers into ham radio as a major factor in recent decades.  Plus VHF/UHF technical progress to open those frontiers  to us.  Certainly the economic growth of the World has brought the majority of DX on the air, and continues to be a driving force  in most places but here.  And I m sure Ive missed  quite a few other "major" factors.

Yes, in a way, a person seeks out ham radio, rather than the hobby "kibitzing" for followers.
If someone is not mentally disposed towards the hobby, it would take a lot of conditioning (no disrespect intended) to make them
wish to pursue it.
The same holds true for me for example, towards taking up fitness training!

In the end, the person  chooses the hobby not the other way around.

73s
« Last Edit: October 02, 2011, 03:11:56 PM by STAYVERTICAL » Logged
ONAIR
Member

Posts: 1747




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: October 11, 2011, 11:07:05 PM »

  Back in the '60s, kids would hear us chatting on AM on their CB Walkie Talkies with regenerative receivers.  That gave us loads of free advertising and sparked a lot of interest.  To have the same effect today, we would probably need a ham radio Iphone app!
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!