Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Amature radio in the military  (Read 23895 times)
OLDWORLDER
Member

Posts: 20




Ignore
« on: September 19, 2011, 05:59:07 PM »

Can members of the armed forces own and use amature radio while on active duty?
Logged
KB6HOH
Member

Posts: 189




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2011, 02:00:23 AM »

Greetings!

           Being ExMilitary I will answer your Question BUT I would like to know your Callsign and Name 1st. Its always nice knowing who I am talking to.

                             de Steve KB6HOH
Logged
KA5N
Member

Posts: 4380




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2011, 03:56:28 AM »

Can members of the armed forces own and use amature radio while on active duty?


I don't know of anybody who uses "amature" radio.   Perhaps Amateur Radio. 

Allen
Logged
AA4PB
Member

Posts: 12897




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2011, 08:31:47 AM »

Yes they can but they have to follow the same rules as everyone else. If they are stationed in the U.S. then they are good to go except that they may need their COs permission if operating from base housing. If they are inside another country then they generally need permission from that country to operate as well.
Logged
OLDWORLDER
Member

Posts: 20




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: September 20, 2011, 11:20:20 AM »

Sorry my spelling is awful.  My name is Jermiah and my call is KI4SHR.
Logged
W3LK
Member

Posts: 5639




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: September 20, 2011, 12:51:58 PM »

Licensed amateurs on active duty can have a station with the permission of their command.

Other than this, and MARS stations, there is no military use of amateur radio.

Lon - NNN0OOR / NNN0AS1 THREE (Former MDE SMD, Deputy SMD, Assistant For Net Operations)
Southern New England Navy-Marine Corps MARS
Proudly Serving Those Who Serve
Logged

A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
N3WAK
Member

Posts: 279




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: September 21, 2011, 07:44:52 AM »

Jermiah:  I am retired Air Force, and was a ham before, an SWL during, and a ham after my 20 years on active duty. 

1.  Assuming you're not stationed overseas but living here, what you do off-base is your business, unless it's a violation of the law like driving while intoxicated.  If you're a ham, you are free to ham-it-up.  Nobody in the military cares what color your shirt is, what your shoe size is, or whether you're a ham, and you don't have to ask your commander for permission. 

2.  If you live on a military installation, as I did at Ellsworth AFB in South Dakota (and elsewhere), you will need to check the base/post/camp housing regulation to see if you can have a transmitter and/or outside antenna.  I read through the housing regulation at the time, and saw no prohibition on transmitters, and I don't recall any mention of an outside antenna.  I was an SWL when I was in SD, and had a random-length wire antenna in the back yard.  Relatively unobtrusive, and no problem. 

3.  If you live OCONUS in a foreign country, you should check with your base/post/camp/ship legal office and the local radio amateur licensing body to find out what operating restrictions, if any, there are.  I worked in a base legal office for 20 years, and read through a lot of regulations in my time, and never came across a prohibition on operating a ham radio station--at least stateside. 

4.  When I was traveling on military business ("TDY," or on temporary duty), which I did a lot--to Alaska, Hawaii, Germany, Saudi Arabia, Bosnia, and throughout the States, I did a lot of SWLing while staying in billeting.  I'd throw a long wire out of the window and use a general coverage receiver in my room.  I had a ball, and nobody said boo.

5.  Being in the military is great (at least, it's great about 98% of the time, but the other 2% might not be a lot of fun, depending on what you do, where you're stationed, and whether anybody is shooting at you).  There are usually few, if any, restrictions on ham radio operators, and what you do off-base is up to you--not your CO.   

73, Tony N3WAK
Logged
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6045




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: September 21, 2011, 12:03:05 PM »

The technicality of checking in with the base commander is a requirement simply so that if they receive interference or have a problem with the base electronics, they will know who to come to get--to shoot!   Grin

Seriously though, most of the time the base commander needs to know so if there is anything out of the ordinary happening, the base personnel are aware of your activities and can request you to temporarily stop operating on certain bands if needed.
Logged
AA4PB
Member

Posts: 12897




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: September 24, 2011, 12:14:33 PM »

When I was in Naval Aviation (1960s), one reason for the command wanting to know about amateur radio operations from the base was so that they could notify you to shut down your transmitter during times they were loading ordinance. For the same reason, you were NOT permitted to operate mobile while on base property. I used to get phone calls to cease operation fairly regularly so they did take it serious.

Every place I was stationed you were required to get command permission to operate an amateur station from anywhere on the base, including base housing. I don't think it was ever denied, they just need to know about it in case there is a problem of some type.
Logged
KG0RN
Member

Posts: 1




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2011, 08:47:56 AM »

Just a quick note -

Back in the late 70's I was stationed at Wurtsmith AFB in Michigan and lived in on-base military housing. I not only had permission to operate from my home, I had an approved work-order for Civil Engineering to provide me a 50' utility pole for an antenna. I worked MARS at the time and was considered a base resource for emergency communications.

The bad news - because of funding limits at the time, I never got my pole actually installed and shortly later transferred to Colo. so never was able to follow through. Went inactive in Colo and only recently started to get active again.

Steve
KG0RN
Logged
AC4RD
Member

Posts: 1235




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: October 06, 2011, 09:14:30 AM »

Assuming you're not stationed overseas but living here, what you do off-base is your business, unless it's a violation of the law like driving while intoxicated.  If you're a ham, you are free to ham-it-up.  Nobody in the military cares what color your shirt is, what your shoe size is, or whether you're a ham, and you don't have to ask your commander for permission. 

Tony, is that the "don't ask, don't tell" thing I keep hearing them talk about?   Wink
Logged
N3WAK
Member

Posts: 279




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: October 07, 2011, 07:41:56 AM »

Well, that's a bit different.  But now, you're free to take your ham gear out of the closet and proudly advertise the fact that you're not only in the United States armed forces, but you're a ham, to boot.  No need to hide your rig and antenna from the base commander, as there's finally been a recognition that there's nothing incompatible about being a ham and being a Soldier, Sailor, Airman or Marine. 

Who knows:  One day, we might even see "Ham Pride" parades, where lots of geezers in sensible shoes with velcro fasteners, wearing polyester pants with elastic waistbands, shuffle down Main Street or parade in front of the Commissary, celebrating both their hobby and their status as Veterans. 

Aim High!  73, Tony N3WAK
Logged
W3DCB
Member

Posts: 30




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: October 29, 2011, 06:28:42 PM »

I lived on base at Andrews AFB in Washington...Had several dipoles up a few hundred yards from Air Force-1 hanger --  no problem...
Daniel w3dcb
Logged
AA4PB
Member

Posts: 12897




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: October 30, 2011, 12:41:06 PM »

So are you saying you just did it without asking and got away with it or are you saying Andrews has no notification requirements for amateur radio operations on base?

Back in the 1960's the Navy had written requirements (even for Mobiles in private vehicles) because they were concerned about the remote possibility of inadvertently setting off armaments while loading and unloading the aircraft on the flight line.
Logged
W3HKK
Member

Posts: 596




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: November 05, 2011, 08:19:44 AM »

I was licensed some years ago through USAF base officials but  by the  countries FCC in which I lived.    This was in the late 60s when I was stationed  in France and Libya. 

I operated from a modest station located in my barracks in France, and from the  Collins-equipped MARS station in Libya.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!