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Author Topic: Nichrome wire  (Read 7066 times)
5B4AET
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Posts: 41




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« on: September 26, 2011, 11:04:20 AM »

Probably this is a "silly" question but unfortunately I dont know the answer.

How do I solder a nichrome wire? Is there a specific method?

Thanks

Panicos
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KA4POL
Member

Posts: 1856




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« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2011, 11:27:26 AM »

You need acid core solder. Are you by any means in the explosives business Grin Nichrome is usually used for ignition systems.
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G3RZP
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Posts: 4322




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« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2011, 11:37:06 AM »

Better is a blow pipe, silver solder (say Easiflo #1) and a suitable flux. Then anneal it at 120C for a couple of hours.
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5B4AET
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Posts: 41




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« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2011, 12:08:34 PM »

Difficult!!!

Thanks for help and info!

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WB6BYU
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Posts: 12978




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« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2011, 01:13:42 PM »

The biggest problem with using solder is that, generally, nichrome wire is going to get hot in the application,
and solder will melt.  Depending on your application, some other method of joining it may be better.
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KA4POL
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Posts: 1856




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« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2011, 10:03:49 PM »

As ignition wiring it does not play much of a role  Cheesy

As long as the temperature stays below 350° F there is no big issue with solder.
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W8JI
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Posts: 9304


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« Reply #6 on: September 27, 2011, 05:44:53 AM »

Probably this is a "silly" question but unfortunately I dont know the answer.

How do I solder a nichrome wire? Is there a specific method?

Thanks

Panicos

You haven't bought into that silly nichrome parasitic suppression Jonestown kool-aid have you Panicos?

No good comes from peppering an amplifier with witchcraft.
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AA4HA
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Posts: 1377




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« Reply #7 on: September 27, 2011, 07:48:34 AM »

Now I need to take apart the toaster to see how they have done it. Last time I had the toaster open was to remove the melted end of a butter knife that was jammed in there to get out a stuck piece of bread.

I was "shocked" by how it was all put together. <p>

They either use compression crimps or screw terminals on a ceramic block.
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3597




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« Reply #8 on: September 27, 2011, 09:41:37 AM »

Panicos: To solder Nichrome wire you will need a either liquid or paste acid flux, (a very small amount applied to the spot to be soldered) and low temperature silver solder. Use a solder gun.  Some pencil soldering irons don't get hot enough to flow even low temp silver solder.

Tisha.. you'll find they "spot weld" the connections inside the toaster.  "Butter knife in the toaster thing"..... shame on you.   Grin
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WB6BYU
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Posts: 12978




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« Reply #9 on: September 27, 2011, 09:46:55 AM »

Quote from: AA4HA
Now I need to take apart the toaster to see how they have done it...


The last time I had to repair a heater element like that, I twisted the two ends together and added
baking soda before powering it on.  Don't remember where I read that, but it got our dinner cooked,
and lasted for at least a few months until we moved out.  (I think it was a spiral oven element,
which certainly would be expected to operate above 350°F.)  A crimp splice would have been
more permanent, but sometimes you have to improvise in the field.
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N2EY
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Posts: 3833




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« Reply #10 on: September 27, 2011, 02:36:16 PM »

No good comes from peppering an amplifier with witchcraft.

I would think that depends on the specific witchcraft. For example, it can't hurt to point a hot soldering iron at a modified amp and yell "Expelliarmus" before removing all the nichrome....

73 de Jim, N2EY
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K1ZJH
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Posts: 884




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« Reply #11 on: September 27, 2011, 08:08:03 PM »


No good comes from peppering an amplifier with witchcraft.

Really shouldn't read these boards with a mouth full of coffee.
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G3RZP
Member

Posts: 4322




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« Reply #12 on: September 28, 2011, 03:53:59 AM »

You need to define 'silver solder'. There are some silver loaded solders that are often called silver solder that have quite low melting points - under 200 degC. The stuff I'm talking about melts at about 610 deg C. If no proper flux is available, use powdered borax, mixed to a very thick paste with water.
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KA4POL
Member

Posts: 1856




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« Reply #13 on: September 28, 2011, 05:03:19 AM »

May be Panicos will tell us what actually he wants to use that joint for. It seems there is just to much unnecessary speculation.
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AA4HA
Member

Posts: 1377




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« Reply #14 on: September 28, 2011, 07:47:38 AM »

You need to define 'silver solder'. There are some silver loaded solders that are often called silver solder that have quite low melting points - under 200 degC. The stuff I'm talking about melts at about 610 deg C. If no proper flux is available, use powdered borax, mixed to a very thick paste with water.
I have seen that too, some of the eutectic mixtures have a 1-3% silver content and a very low melting point. They are called "silver solders" (Cardas is one example). I think of silver solder more along the lines of brazing solder with a MAPP gas torch (MAP gas is not available any more) and oxygen to get the connection really hot. I have a few dozen of those silver ribbons for "hard soldering" (brazing). I only use it on ground connections where normal solders could melt under lightning currents.

I recall taking my laundry dryer apart because the heater element had opened up. I did notice that the connections were all welded. Unfortunately the break was in the middle of the element and the heater box was a sealed unit. It cost around $40 to replace the entire heating assembly but as long as the lint filter is kept clean it will not overheat again. Scary that the thermal cut-outs did not open up when the element became so hot as to break the nichrome element.
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
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