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Author Topic: Nichrome wire  (Read 7199 times)
G3RZP
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« Reply #15 on: September 28, 2011, 08:19:04 AM »

We really need to know the application, and indeed, the material. 'Nichrome' can cover a lot of sins....
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W8JI
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« Reply #16 on: September 29, 2011, 05:22:48 AM »


I recall taking my laundry dryer apart because the heater element had opened up. I did notice that the connections were all welded. Unfortunately the break was in the middle of the element and the heater box was a sealed unit. It cost around $40 to replace the entire heating assembly but as long as the lint filter is kept clean it will not overheat again. Scary that the thermal cut-outs did not open up when the element became so hot as to break the nichrome element.

You need a new butler if he is not keeping your lint traps clear..
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KB1LKR
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« Reply #17 on: October 01, 2011, 02:32:39 PM »

"You need to define 'silver solder'. There are some silver loaded solders that are often called silver solder that have quite low melting points - under 200 degC. The stuff I'm talking about melts at about 610 deg C."

In this context "a silver brazing alloy" of which there are many (colloquially known as "silver solders" in spite of melting points much higher than true solders -- melt points below (often far below) about 400°C).

As an aside: highest melting point solders I'm aware of are Pb93.5/Sn5/Ag1.5 "HMP" (a bit of Silver & Tin but mostly Lead -- M.P. 296-301°C; difficult to use compared to 60/40  or 63/37 -- doesn't wet as easily, and Au88/Ge12 (Gold/Gallium) M.P. 356°C -- EXPENSIVE!!! Used for specialty [extra!] high temperature electronics packaging applications I believe, clearly not an option here!
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G3RZP
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« Reply #18 on: October 02, 2011, 01:50:22 AM »

'Silver brazing alloys' are universally referred to over here as 'silver solder', even by the manufacturers. The low melting point stuff is a relatively recent product.
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