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Author Topic: New ten meter Ham rig - Magnum 257HP  (Read 43944 times)
WB9YCJ
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Posts: 283




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« on: October 10, 2011, 04:42:51 AM »

I submitted my review of the new RF Limited Magnum 257HP to Eham product review as a new radio and my submission was denied or ignored.

The Eham staff member who runs product review didnt reply to me.

Review submission policy states:
Reviews of equipment considered
by eHam to be primarily for
CB/Freeband operation or
non FCC approved may be removed.


My best guess is it may not be FCC approved?
If it is approved, it would enjoy a spot in "reviews" in my opinion.


The similiar Radio Shack HTX ten meter series however indeed is in the product reviews.

Ken
« Last Edit: October 10, 2011, 05:10:29 AM by WB9YCJ » Logged
NA4M
Member

Posts: 61




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« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2011, 05:55:43 AM »

I submitted my review of the new RF Limited Magnum 257HP to Eham product review as a new radio and my submission was denied or ignored.

The Eham staff member who runs product review didnt reply to me.

Review submission policy states:
Reviews of equipment considered
by eHam to be primarily for
CB/Freeband operation or
non FCC approved may be removed.


My best guess is it may not be FCC approved?
If it is approved, it would enjoy a spot in "reviews" in my opinion.


The similiar Radio Shack HTX ten meter series however indeed is in the product reviews.

Ken

I don't recall receiving any email regarding a recent review for this product.  But I could have missed it as I was traveling for several days recently. My apologies if your email was overlooked.

The Magnum 257 is a CB/freeband radio disguised as a 10m radio and easily converted to coverage outside 10m as are other radios of this type.  

Quote from a CB/Export radio forum review:

"This radio comes from the manufacturer set for 10 meter operation. It can be easily modified - by the purchaser - for frequencies between 25.165 to 29.699mhz."

A quick search with Google reveals the true target market for these radios.

eHam prefers not to support reviews of this type radio.  We'll take a look at the RS product mentioned. It may have slipped thru the cracks.

Phil NA4M
eHam Product Reviews Manager

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ONAIR
Member

Posts: 1741




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« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2011, 03:57:03 PM »

  I believe that the Radio Shack HTX-100 is a true ham radio.  Thousands of these units were sold all over the United States by Radio Shack, and it operates only on SSB and CW (not AM).  I don't think it is readily or easily modified to cover CB frequencies.
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K0OD
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Posts: 2557




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« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2011, 04:23:48 AM »

"
Quote
The new radio then came with a blue display and Magnum also started including Top Gun technology on the radios by adding the Top Gun Compressor."

Quote
Frequency range: 4 different jumper mods for freqs. I won't list the road map, but in freeband mode it covers from 25.165 to 29.655 in 10 bands of 40channels each. One mod for 10meters, one mod for standard 40channel CB, and two different freeband mods.

Shucks, Top Gun Magnum technology!  But no CW. Maybe they could call CW "Maxim Machine Gun Silencer Technology" (a nod to W1AW and his dad)
« Last Edit: October 12, 2011, 04:32:00 AM by K0OD » Logged
W5GNB
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Posts: 419




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« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2011, 01:31:31 PM »

"FCC APPROVED" for What???
If it is used for AMATEUR use, it should not require any such approvals.  If it were to be used on CB or other "COMMERCIAL" services, it would have to be "Type ACCEPTED" but not for use on HAM FREQUENCIES by HAM OPERATORS!

Gary - W5GNB
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W8JI
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« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2011, 02:00:56 AM »

"FCC APPROVED" for What???
If it is used for AMATEUR use, it should not require any such approvals.  If it were to be used on CB or other "COMMERCIAL" services, it would have to be "Type ACCEPTED" but not for use on HAM FREQUENCIES by HAM OPERATORS!

Gary - W5GNB


Search "illegal CB" here:

http://search2.fcc.gov/search/index.htm?job=search&start=15&q=illegal%20cb%20&as_epq=&as_oq=&as_eq=&as_filetype=&site=fcc_all&as_occt=&num=15&ref=f

According to Section 95.603(c) of the Commission’s rules, a CB transmitter is a transmitter that operates or is intended to operate at a station authorized for the CB service. 47C.F.R. § 95.603(c). The Commission’s equipment authorization experts in the FCC Laboratory have determined that the transceivers listed herein and other similar models at issue here are intended for use on the CB frequencies as well as those in the amateur service because they have built-in capability to operate on CB frequencies. This capability can be readily activated by moving or removing a jumper plug, cutting or splicing a wire, plugging in a connector, or other simple means. Thus, all the transceivers listed herein and similar models fall within the definition of a CB transmitter. See 47C.F.R. § 95.603(c). A CB transmitter must be certificated by the FCC prior to marketing or importation. 47 C.F.R. §§ 95.603(c); 2.803.

Moreover, the dual use CB and amateur radios of the kind at issue here may not be certified under the Commission’s rules. Section 95.655(a) states: "….([CB] Transmitters with frequency capability for the Amateur Radio Services … will not be certificated.)" See also Amendment of Part 95, Subpart E, Technical Regulations in the Personal Radio Services Rules, FCC 88-256, 1888 WL 488084 (August 17, 1988). This clarification was added to explicitly foreclose the possibility of certification of dual use CB and amateur radios, see id, and thereby deter use by CB operators of frequencies allocated for amateur radio use.

In addition, the Commission’s equipment authorization experts have determined that these devices violate or appear to violate a number of the rules governing CB devices. For example, they may use emission types not permitted, or emit RF power at a level in excess of the levels permitted in the CB radio service. See 47 C.F.R. § 95.639.

In view of the foregoing, the following "10-meter" transceivers are not acceptable for importation or marketing into/within the United States. Importation and marketing of these units is illegal pursuant to Section 302(b) of the Communications Act and Section 2.803 of the rules. Willful violations of the Rules and the Act may subject the violator to a monetary forfeiture of not more than $11,000 for each violation or each day of a continuing violation. The Commission continues to review this type of equipment, and additional makes and models may be added to this list in the future.

LIST OF TRANSCEIVERS ILLEGAL TO IMPORT OR MARKET

ALBRECHT - model: AE-497
COBRA - model: 200 GTL DX
CONNEX - models: 3300, 3300 HP, 3300HP-ZX, 3300 PLUS, CX-3800, 4300 HP, 4300 HP 300, 4400, 4400 HP, 4600 Turbo, 4800 DXL, 4800 HPE, Deer Hunter, General Lee, General Washington
DRAGON - model: SS-497
EAGLE - models: 2000 (same radio as the Saturn) and 5000 (same radio as the Saturn Turbo).
GALAXY - models: 33HML, 44V, 45MP, 48T, 55, 55V, 66V, 73V, 77, 77HML, 88HL, 93T, 95T, 99V, 2517, 2527, 2547, DX94HP, Melaka, Saturn and Saturn Turbo
GENERAL - General Jackson, Grant, Stonewall Jackson, Lee, Washington, A.P. Hill, Longstreet, Sherman
INTEK - model: Multicom-497
MAGNUM - models: 257, 357DX, Alpha force, Delta Force, Mini, Omega Force,S3, S3RF, S6, S9,
MIRAGE - models: 33HP, 44, 88, 99, 2950, 2950EX, 2970, 6600, 88H/L, 9900,
NORTH STAR - models: NS-3000 and NS-9000
PRESIDENT - models: Grant, J.F.K., Jackson, Lincoln, HR-2510 and HR-2600
PRO STAR - model: 240
RANGER / RCI - models: AR-3500, RCI-2900, RCI-2950, RCI-2950-DX, RCI-2970, RCI-2970-DX, RCI-2980-WX, RCI-2985-DX, RCI-2995-DX, RCI-6300, RCI-6300 Turbo, RCI-6300F-25, RCI-6300F-150, RCI-6900, RCI-6900 Turbo, RCI-6900F-25, RCI-6900F-150, RG-99, Voyage VR-9000
STRYKER - model: 440
SUPERSTAR - model: 121, 122, 36, 3700, 3900, 3900HP, 3900 American Spirit, 3900 HP G, 3900 Gold, 3900GHPA, 3900GHPM, 4800, Grant
TEK - model: HR-3950
UNIDEN - models: HR-2510 and HR-2600
VIRAGE - model: 3300, 3300 HP, VX-38, VX-39,
« Last Edit: October 15, 2011, 02:35:30 AM by W8JI » Logged
W8JI
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Posts: 9296


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« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2011, 02:12:45 AM »

IThe similiar Radio Shack HTX ten meter series however indeed is in the product reviews.

Ken

The HTX is not obviously intended for use on CB, and is not on the FCC's banned radio list.
The Magnum is considered to be an illegal pirate CB radio by the FCC.

Even if it were not banned, the Magnum is a dirty radio that does not even use a linear RF transistor. Who would want to run something like that on a Ham band?

Anyone supporting use of a Magnum and other banned radios is really supporting bootleggers who operate on ten meters, because they are feeding money back to people who sell things to CBers, who then operate outside the CB band.

Anyone buying or supporting Magnum radios and other banned radios is really supporting truck drivers and others who use ten meters illegally. They more radios like that they sell, the more effort they will make to import them.
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KE5JPP
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Posts: 0




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« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2011, 06:20:57 AM »

Just do a video review of the radio and place it on YouTube.   More and more user reviews are being done this way and you actually get to see the product. 

Eham's reviews are a joke anyhow and with other places to actually "see" a review such as YouTube, Eham is becoming more and more irrelevant and old (like the general Ham population in the US).

Gene
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KE5JPP
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Posts: 0




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« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2011, 07:24:34 AM »



The Magnum 257 is a CB/freeband radio disguised as a 10m radio and easily converted to coverage outside 10m as are other radios of this type.  


What modern transceiver from ICOM, KENWOOD, ALINCO, or YAESU is NOT "easily converted to coverage outside 10m as are other radios of this type"?  To get general coverage transmit on these Ham radios requires no more effort than what is required to expand the coverage of these 10 meter radios.  I am not supporting illegal out of band operation, but lets be honest about this.  The problem does not only involve these 10 meter type radios.

Gene
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W8JI
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« Reply #9 on: October 17, 2011, 10:54:53 AM »

What modern transceiver from ICOM, KENWOOD, ALINCO, or YAESU is NOT "easily converted to coverage outside 10m as are other radios of this type"?  To get general coverage transmit on these Ham radios requires no more effort than what is required to expand the coverage of these 10 meter radios. 

That's not true at all.

Also, the problem is the INTENT of the radio. Obviously the Magnum is marketed primarily as a CB radio. It is almost exclusively sold in CB shops or CB websites by CB dealers who offer on-site conversions or simple instructions.

If that isn't enough, the FCC defines it as an illegal CB-style radio.   
 
If that isn't enough, the Magnum, because they pushed the power limit to impress CB'ers with no regard for occupied bandwidth, is not a good radio to load Ham bands up with.

Quote
I am not supporting illegal out of band operation, but lets be honest about this.  The problem does not only involve these 10 meter type radios.

That is true for sure!  The problem also involves people who don't care about ten meters, and/or don't care what the FCC tells us. If the Magnum was a clean radio designed for SSB and marketed for amateur use, no one would be critical of it. When you truckers on ten meters, you can be sure they are likely using a radio just like the Magnum. 

73 Tom
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N0MKC
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Posts: 68




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« Reply #10 on: October 17, 2011, 03:30:10 PM »

I'm kinda sorry the FCC included the President HR2600 in the list; as an evolution of the HR2510, Uniden went out of their way to keep it from being modified for CB, to the point that the only way to modify it to the CB frequencies was by replacing the entire CPU with a ChipSwitch CPU.  This was not a trivial task - 64 pins on .06" centers!

On top of that, it WAS marketed primarily to hams - ads in QST, 73, & CQ, and I don't recall seeing it sold anywhere other than ham outlets.  Solar activity was quite high at the time, and they were rather popular, along with the Radio Shack HTX 10-meter rigs.

While they are not high-end contest rigs, they do have pretty good specs, certainly better than the "CB in 10 meter disguise" rigs...  Their MSRP was significantly higher than the CBs of the time, as well.

The HR2510 was also aimed at hams, but it didn't take long for experimenters to figure out what CPU pin to connect to ground, which explains the FCC's displeasure, and Uniden's reworking to become the HR2600.
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W8JI
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« Reply #11 on: October 17, 2011, 03:48:02 PM »

There is always a little unintended fallout when people push the limits of the law.

Look what the CB thing did to us.
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KE5JPP
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Posts: 0




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« Reply #12 on: October 17, 2011, 05:24:06 PM »

What modern transceiver from ICOM, KENWOOD, ALINCO, or YAESU is NOT "easily converted to coverage outside 10m as are other radios of this type"?  To get general coverage transmit on these Ham radios requires no more effort than what is required to expand the coverage of these 10 meter radios.

That's not true at all.

73 Tom

I disagree.  Most modern Ham radios are very easily modifiable for general coverage transmit - including transmit within the CB band.  

For example the IC 7600/7700/7800 general coverage tx mod involves removing a few diodes.

Gene
« Last Edit: October 17, 2011, 05:31:07 PM by KE5JPP » Logged
KE5JPP
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Posts: 0




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« Reply #13 on: October 18, 2011, 03:21:36 AM »

There is always a little unintended fallout when people push the limits of the law.

Look what the CB thing did to us.

 Roll Eyes Look what the FCC did to us.  They are the ones who created a Citizens band in the 27 MHz range.  What did they think was going to happen on a band where you can work the world on a few watts?

They put it next to a Ham band where Ham equipment and amplifiers were easily made or modified for the CB band.  They lost control of the CB band, expanded the number of channels, then eliminated licensing requirements.

The blame lies on the typical shortsightedness of the Government and the unintended consequences.

Gene
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MAGNUM257
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Posts: 159




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« Reply #14 on: October 18, 2011, 08:18:43 AM »

Part of the blame should go to the HAMs/ARRL for not fighting to keep 11m as a HAM band when the FCC created CB in the mid 1950's. Why not fight to keep a band that can work the world on 5 watts? Wish we had it back....
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