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Author Topic: New ten meter Ham rig - Magnum 257HP  (Read 46292 times)
AK4KZ
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« Reply #15 on: October 18, 2011, 08:32:55 AM »

Part of the blame should go to the HAMs/ARRL for not fighting to keep 11m as a HAM band when the FCC created CB in the mid 1950's. Why not fight to keep a band that can work the world on 5 watts? Wish we had it back....

But think of all the cultural references we would have missed out on.. Smokey and The Bandit.. 10-4 good buddy.. I think we got us a Convoy..

I'm not sure the 70s would've been the same. :-)

73,
Chris
AK4KZ
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W8JI
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« Reply #16 on: October 18, 2011, 08:56:14 AM »

There is always a little unintended fallout when people push the limits of the law.

Look what the CB thing did to us.

 Roll Eyes Look what the FCC did to us.  They are the ones who created a Citizens band in the 27 MHz range.  What did they think was going to happen on a band where you can work the world on a few watts?

They put it next to a Ham band where Ham equipment and amplifiers were easily made or modified for the CB band.  They lost control of the CB band, expanded the number of channels, then eliminated licensing requirements.

The blame lies on the typical shortsightedness of the Government and the unintended consequences.

Gene


That's correct. The short sightedness started in earnest around 1983.

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N0YXB
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« Reply #17 on: October 18, 2011, 10:09:05 AM »

There is always a little unintended fallout when people push the limits of the law.

Look what the CB thing did to us.

 Roll Eyes Look what the FCC did to us.  They are the ones who created a Citizens band in the 27 MHz range.  What did they think was going to happen on a band where you can work the world on a few watts?

They put it next to a Ham band where Ham equipment and amplifiers were easily made or modified for the CB band.  They lost control of the CB band, expanded the number of channels, then eliminated licensing requirements.

The blame lies on the typical shortsightedness of the Government and the unintended consequences.

Gene


Sounds like excuses to me.  How about just doing the right thing instead of making excuses?  Sad.
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KE5JPP
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« Reply #18 on: October 18, 2011, 11:35:34 AM »

There is always a little unintended fallout when people push the limits of the law.

Look what the CB thing did to us.

 Roll Eyes Look what the FCC did to us.  They are the ones who created a Citizens band in the 27 MHz range.  What did they think was going to happen on a band where you can work the world on a few watts?

They put it next to a Ham band where Ham equipment and amplifiers were easily made or modified for the CB band.  They lost control of the CB band, expanded the number of channels, then eliminated licensing requirements.

The blame lies on the typical shortsightedness of the Government and the unintended consequences.

Gene


Sounds like excuses to me.  How about just doing the right thing instead of making excuses?  Sad.

WHAT MAKE BELIEVE WORLD DO YOU LIVE IN???

There would be no need for the FCC, or its rules, or any form of government for that matter, if people "just did the right thing"!

Gene
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W4KVW
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« Reply #19 on: November 15, 2011, 06:59:06 PM »

The FCC should have given away 10 meters & kept 11 meters but as usual they SCREWED UP! The MAGNUM 257 is a HIGH DOLLAR "OVER RATED" CB RADIO that is NOT a 10 meter radio.NOTHING wrong with talking on the CB band but ONLY on LEGAL CB radios just as we all should do what's LEGAL on the Ham Radio Bands! Find you an HTX-10 or HTX-100 * ENJOY the 10 meter band while it's WIDE OPEN almost EVERY DAY! Grin

Clayton
W4KVW
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N0YXB
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« Reply #20 on: November 16, 2011, 10:01:55 AM »



 Roll Eyes Look what the FCC did to us.  They are the ones who created a Citizens band in the 27 MHz range.  What did they think was going to happen on a band where you can work the world on a few watts?

They put it next to a Ham band where Ham equipment and amplifiers were easily made or modified for the CB band.  They lost control of the CB band, expanded the number of channels, then eliminated licensing requirements.

The blame lies on the typical shortsightedness of the Government and the unintended consequences.

Gene

[/quote]

Sounds like excuses to me.  How about just doing the right thing instead of making excuses?  Sad.
[/quote]

WHAT MAKE BELIEVE WORLD DO YOU LIVE IN???

There would be no need for the FCC, or its rules, or any form of government for that matter, if people "just did the right thing"!

Gene

[/quote]

I live in the real world and strive to always do the right thing.  Many others live this way too.  Thankfully we have laws for those who won't.
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W8JI
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« Reply #21 on: November 21, 2011, 03:25:27 AM »



 Roll Eyes Look what the FCC did to us.  They are the ones who created a Citizens band in the 27 MHz range.  What did they think was going to happen on a band where you can work the world on a few watts?

11 meters, at the time the decision was made, was an ideal choice of a low-cost necessary personal and business communications band.

It was a sound and logical choice, given the trends and technology at the time of creation.

73 Tom
 
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N3JBH
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« Reply #22 on: November 21, 2011, 09:29:29 AM »

Did they not at one time consider a area around 220 mhz for the CB band ? Seems to me i had a old midland radio that was being manufactured for the CB band, But this move never happened?
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W8JI
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« Reply #23 on: November 21, 2011, 10:03:11 AM »

Did they not at one time consider a area around 220 mhz for the CB band ? Seems to me i had a old midland radio that was being manufactured for the CB band, But this move never happened?

AFAIK there was a 450 MHz band and the 11 meter band.

At one time I had a couple regenerative receiver rigs for the old UHF CB band.
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AE6ZW
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« Reply #24 on: December 03, 2011, 12:09:34 AM »

I guess , it is a loop hole of the rule,  FCC does not require any certification of transmitter marketed for parts 97 service.  just receiver if , only has SCANNING capability, it require FCC parts 15 certification.  I guess the question is radio cover ham band and beyond can consider ham radio ?  I think many ham radio are capable of transmitting outside of HAM band, such as my old TEN TEC radio, which has 500kHz wide VFO ( 5.0 to 5.5 MHz ) , and mixed with band switching crystal OSC.   and BFO OSC, etc  for TX.    technically, many HAM radio is capable of transmitting frequency regulated by regulation other than parts 97.   I guess if  anyone want to prevent anyone to marketing the radio,  which also cover other than frequencies regulated by parts 97 , it require rule changes.  some country , it is against a law to even own transmitter capable of transmitting in frequency they don't have license for. if such law is passed in US, many of the current HAM radio become illegal, including my old TEN TEC  Or, may be FCC can make any commercially manufactured parts 97 transmitter must require certification.  just like scanner can not be modified to listen for cellular frequency.  Or, make it requirement that seller of amateur radio must check buyer has valid amateur radio license. buyer must show ham radio license of the proper class eligible to transmit that person intended to buy. in this case, general Class licensee can not buy transmitter which are capable of transmit in Extra/Advanced class band.    right now, I suppose, if radio cover any parts of parts 97 frequency, seller can say it is amateur radio transmitter, therefore can sell / market such device without any certifications.  I have seen some equipments are sold as  CW HAM transmitter , where it probably can be easily modified to be work as amplifier, however, it is not illegal with parts 97 rules. as  Ham Transmitter does not require FCC certification.  just the amplifier below 144 MHz do.
« Last Edit: December 03, 2011, 12:13:19 AM by AE6ZW » Logged
KD8GTP
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Posts: 77




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« Reply #25 on: December 11, 2011, 05:33:40 AM »

I have a Connex 3300HP and am looking at the Magnum for a xmas present for myself. Youtube has some reviews of the Magnum and from what I can see it looks like a nice unit. I see they have switched over to the blue display from the older yellow which is a welcome change. The fact that it comes with a power mic is also nice but you need to open the mic to get at the pot to make adjustments, what were they thinking? The radio also has a nice feature - the ability to program buttons to memorize channels and modes. With a few simple steps you can program the buttons for your favorite channels and modes making it easy to switch between, nice touch. The fact that it has SSB in such a small radio makes it look like a nice replacement for my Connex.
Thx
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N5RWJ
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« Reply #26 on: December 29, 2011, 10:43:55 AM »

"FCC APPROVED" for What???
If it is used for AMATEUR use, it should not require any such approvals.  If it were to be used on CB or other "COMMERCIAL" services, it would have to be "Type ACCEPTED" but not for use on HAM FREQUENCIES by HAM OPERATORS!

Gary - W5GNB

I think you will find it is leagel

Search "illegal CB" here:

http://search2.fcc.gov/search/index.htm?job=search&start=15&q=illegal%20cb%20&as_epq=&as_oq=&as_eq=&as_filetype=&site=fcc_all&as_occt=&num=15&ref=f

According to Section 95.603(c) of the Commission’s rules, a CB transmitter is a transmitter that operates or is intended to operate at a station authorized for the CB service. 47C.F.R. § 95.603(c). The Commission’s equipment authorization experts in the FCC Laboratory have determined that the transceivers listed herein and other similar models at issue here are intended for use on the CB frequencies as well as those in the amateur service because they have built-in capability to operate on CB frequencies. This capability can be readily activated by moving or removing a jumper plug, cutting or splicing a wire, plugging in a connector, or other simple means. Thus, all the transceivers listed herein and similar models fall within the definition of a CB transmitter. See 47C.F.R. § 95.603(c). A CB transmitter must be certificated by the FCC prior to marketing or importation. 47 C.F.R. §§ 95.603(c); 2.803.

Moreover, the dual use CB and amateur radios of the kind at issue here may not be certified under the Commission’s rules. Section 95.655(a) states: "….([CB] Transmitters with frequency capability for the Amateur Radio Services … will not be certificated.)" See also Amendment of Part 95, Subpart E, Technical Regulations in the Personal Radio Services Rules, FCC 88-256, 1888 WL 488084 (August 17, 1988). This clarification was added to explicitly foreclose the possibility of certification of dual use CB and amateur radios, see id, and thereby deter use by CB operators of frequencies allocated for amateur radio use.

In addition, the Commission’s equipment authorization experts have determined that these devices violate or appear to violate a number of the rules governing CB devices. For example, they may use emission types not permitted, or emit RF power at a level in excess of the levels permitted in the CB radio service. See 47 C.F.R. § 95.639.

In view of the foregoing, the following "10-meter" transceivers are not acceptable for importation or marketing into/within the United States. Importation and marketing of these units is illegal pursuant to Section 302(b) of the Communications Act and Section 2.803 of the rules. Willful violations of the Rules and the Act may subject the violator to a monetary forfeiture of not more than $11,000 for each violation or each day of a continuing violation. The Commission continues to review this type of equipment, and additional makes and models may be added to this list in the future.

LIST OF TRANSCEIVERS ILLEGAL TO IMPORT OR MARKET

ALBRECHT - model: AE-497
COBRA - model: 200 GTL DX
CONNEX - models: 3300, 3300 HP, 3300HP-ZX, 3300 PLUS, CX-3800, 4300 HP, 4300 HP 300, 4400, 4400 HP, 4600 Turbo, 4800 DXL, 4800 HPE, Deer Hunter, General Lee, General Washington
DRAGON - model: SS-497
EAGLE - models: 2000 (same radio as the Saturn) and 5000 (same radio as the Saturn Turbo).
GALAXY - models: 33HML, 44V, 45MP, 48T, 55, 55V, 66V, 73V, 77, 77HML, 88HL, 93T, 95T, 99V, 2517, 2527, 2547, DX94HP, Melaka, Saturn and Saturn Turbo
GENERAL - General Jackson, Grant, Stonewall Jackson, Lee, Washington, A.P. Hill, Longstreet, Sherman
INTEK - model: Multicom-497
MAGNUM - models: 257, 357DX, Alpha force, Delta Force, Mini, Omega Force,S3, S3RF, S6, S9,
MIRAGE - models: 33HP, 44, 88, 99, 2950, 2950EX, 2970, 6600, 88H/L, 9900,
NORTH STAR - models: NS-3000 and NS-9000
PRESIDENT - models: Grant, J.F.K., Jackson, Lincoln, HR-2510 and HR-2600
PRO STAR - model: 240
RANGER / RCI - models: AR-3500, RCI-2900, RCI-2950, RCI-2950-DX, RCI-2970, RCI-2970-DX, RCI-2980-WX, RCI-2985-DX, RCI-2995-DX, RCI-6300, RCI-6300 Turbo, RCI-6300F-25, RCI-6300F-150, RCI-6900, RCI-6900 Turbo, RCI-6900F-25, RCI-6900F-150, RG-99, Voyage VR-9000
STRYKER - model: 440
SUPERSTAR - model: 121, 122, 36, 3700, 3900, 3900HP, 3900 American Spirit, 3900 HP G, 3900 Gold, 3900GHPA, 3900GHPM, 4800, Grant
TEK - model: HR-3950
UNIDEN - models: HR-2510 and HR-2600
VIRAGE - model: 3300, 3300 HP, VX-38, VX-39,

I think you will find it's not only legal to import your list of radios, but sale them as well( Per fed court court order ). The FCC can only get involved, when the radio it use illegally,
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K3WEC
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« Reply #27 on: January 06, 2012, 01:15:38 PM »

Seriously, who really cares about CB this much?  I have one (not souped up) and it's a good tool...and sometimes fun.  I will probably get another someday.  It is not ham radio.  It is CB.  I haven't heard any interference on 10m, but don't doubt that it happens.   Just tune away from it because you're not going to stop them and neither is the FCC.   We can revisit this thread 10 years from now and I guarantee the same situation will exist.   CB is not going away, and neither are these radios.   

There ARE good operators on CB just as there are poor.  There ARE poor operators in Ham just as there are good.     
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NC4TB
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« Reply #28 on: January 13, 2012, 05:46:44 AM »

I too put a CB radio in my car on trips. Couldn't tell you how much time this unit has saved me by allowing reroutes around accidents. We went to New Orleans several years ago, monitored the alleged ham call freq 146.52 all the way. Heard absolutely NO activity on it, nor could I get anyone to answer me. Lets stop griping about about CBers and their activities, legal or otherwise, as long as they stay off the 10 mtr band and don't interfere with our communications. If they are over power or on an illegal frequency [not on 10 mtrs] I could care less. That issue is between them and the FCC. I have yet to find a CBer who wouldn't talk to me if they could hear me, which is more than I can say about some hams, a fair number of which have "know it all", condescending attitudes. Don't get me wrong, most of us are decent, friendly folk but some are just jerks. That some CBers have equipment that can talk around the world shouldn't concern us. Is this some form of jelousy that we chose to go through a licensing process and learn more about our hobby than they did? That the 11 mtr band is out of control is due to bad choices by the FCC. I think we can see some of their bad operating methods on our bands as well, and we are supposedly better than they are. I wonder.......
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REGNAR
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« Reply #29 on: January 18, 2012, 02:47:31 PM »

I use the Magnum 257 and a homebrew 200 watt amp in my mobile ON 10 METERS,so why isn't it a 10 meter radio ? The radio operates fine on 10 meters and I have contacts all over the US and other countries on it,so how can it not be a 10 meter radio if I am using it on 10 meters ? Is it easily modified for 11 meters,yes,but so are ALL of the major brans of ham radios,ALL OF THEM !I can't believe e-Ham would censor a review on this radio,I'm glad the HAM RADIO STORE where I purchased mine at said they were pretty good,small sized mobile 10 meter radios at at a fairley inexpensive price.WTF is wrong with some people,if the radio works on 10 meters it IS a 10 meter radio !
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