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Author Topic: Which distress/ Mayday frequencies? Anybody monitoring?  (Read 26560 times)
AB7KT
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Posts: 155




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« Reply #30 on: January 17, 2012, 11:01:46 PM »

I think, where you are would be a significant factor in what frequency would bring you help in a real emergency.
In urban areas, I think there are a lot more people monitoring the local 2 meter and 440 repeaters than you might think. You may think the repeater is dead, but I bet there are people out there listening. If you say something stupid, just watch how many people heard it that you didn't know were listening.
Out here in the southwestern US, once you leave the city, you are probably way out of range from any repeater. Simplex would be a long shot simply because the only person who might hear you would be another mobile ham operator passing within range AND listening to simplex. It's hard for most easterners to imagine being on a highway where you might be 75 miles from the closet house. Where you might be on a highway where a car might pass by every half hour. And that is if you are on the road. If you are off-roading or hiking or something, you have a big problem. And in the desert heat, being stranded IS a life threatening emergency.

I think it is a good idea to have access to a CB radio although I would really hate to depend on it if my fat was in the fire. Having one gives you another option. But, First of all, the frequency range of CB is pretty unreliable most of the time: part of that is due to the fact that there are layer upon layer of people talking on the frequency. Then there is the fact that a lot (not all) of the people you hear on CB radio are clowns and/or drunk clowns. Out in the middle of no-where I think you would have a better chance of a trucker on CB hearing you than anything on the VHF/UHF ham bands. And, obviously it allows you to comunicate with people who arn't hams.

If I was out in the middle of no-where and was in trouble, having an HF Ham Radio seems to me to be the way to go. You don't need an emergency frequency. Either break into an exisiting QSO or just call Mayday on whatever frequency is on the dial. Someone will hear you and be happy to help.
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I thought you said this was a weak signal mode ? I HAVE a weak signal and he still didn't hear me.

FWIW: My callsign is AB8KT
N5RWJ
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Posts: 461




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« Reply #31 on: January 18, 2012, 02:20:30 PM »

What is almost laughable is that with all the prep FEMA and ECCOM folks do, little do they figure out what common mode of communications nearly each and ever delivery truck in the nation has, a CB radio.

Mike
I have seen the FEMA list for HF, and its kept secret ,and shouldn't be talk about, now that was about 20 years back.
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KD0KZE
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Posts: 20




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« Reply #32 on: January 26, 2012, 01:20:38 PM »

For local emergencies on 2m,  at least in my area, I'd expect most traffic on the local radio club repeater.  After some severe weather last summer, a few of us scattered in the repeater range would start an informal "everyone ok?" ragchew.  If Skywarn is called up, that's a different repeater & operating protocol.  If all repeaters are down, all telephone is down, etc. then I guess it would be a toss up between the 2m emergency calling frequency or listening (simplex only) on the knocked-out repeater input and/or output frequency.

Now that I think about it, probably a simplex emergency calling frequency would be best, since it would be confusing to work a dead repeater freq. as a local watering hole.  Input vs. output frequency, some people would have offsets and PL tones programmed into their radios which would no longer serve a useful purpose, etc.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2012, 01:23:26 PM by KD0KZE » Logged
KF5GYX
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Posts: 6




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« Reply #33 on: January 26, 2012, 07:26:59 PM »

I've got an 8900 in my car. I've got all the local repeaters, calling freqs for 10m/6m/2m/70cm  frs, gmrs, murs programmed in. I've got my radio on medium power, EXCEPT for the 6 calling frequencies, which are on full power. I figure if I had to use those, I'd need the help.   By chance, I've also got several repeaters for outlying areas programmed in. I'm in Austin Tx. I happened to be on a road trip to Dallas when i got caught in a hail storm. I pulled under an overpass and flipped my radio on and hit a repeater up the road that was the NOAA  OEM  node for the area. We were able to trade info back and forth on the storm


So to recap, I'd suggest
the calling freqs for your area
local repeaters and repeaters from outlining areas you may be traveling to (I keep the pocket repeater guide in my car and in my go bag just in case)
'common' channels, meaning CB, FRS, GMRS, MURS, etc.  The yaesu 7r was my first radio just for this reason, it's got a wide band rx (and tx) and can cover all of those things
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NX5MK
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Posts: 65




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« Reply #34 on: January 28, 2012, 04:51:40 PM »

KF5GYX,

Do I understand it correctly that you have local 10m and 6m frequencies? I really like your suggestions.

vy 73 de Marcus KD0JKM
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KF5GYX
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Posts: 6




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« Reply #35 on: January 30, 2012, 09:06:55 PM »

my 8900 only does FM, so I've got the 10m calling freq..

For 6m, there are 3 repeaters in my area, so I've got those loaded up, as well as the 6m FM calling freq.

I personally don't like having call signs as the names, so I get creative with my display

10m-cal
6m-cal
6m-1 (repeater)
6m-2 (repeater)


and so on.    I got some 2m calling freq traffic over the weekend, which is pretty rare but picking up in my area of Texas.
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W5TTW
Member

Posts: 42




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« Reply #36 on: February 03, 2012, 07:12:16 AM »


But you do have your HF rig with you... Which frequencies will you try to call help on?



Any freq where I hear activity.  If that doesn't work, I'd go to 60m and call DX or ask if anyone is interested in a ragchew.  That will get the ham-police's attention.
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ONAIR
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Posts: 1738




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« Reply #37 on: February 03, 2012, 11:00:14 AM »


But you do have your HF rig with you... Which frequencies will you try to call help on?



Any freq where I hear activity.  If that doesn't work, I'd go to 60m and call DX or ask if anyone is interested in a ragchew.  That will get the ham-police's attention.
   Whenever you can't seem to get anyone to answer you on a repeater, there is a simple trick to magically make loads of contacts!  Simply yell:  "Breaker-by channel.  Are there any good buddies out here on this repeater, who got conditions on this mud duck?"
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KD0PBO
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Posts: 67




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« Reply #38 on: February 04, 2012, 10:39:28 PM »

Just to put it out there..

Missouri Highway Patrol still actively monitors CB 9 while on patrols. One of the few law enforcement groups left to do so (that I know of).

As some have mentioned earlier, having at least two outlets for communications is a really smart idea. The above fact about CB 9 is one reason I still have my CB in truck still (aside from having alittle fun out on the farm with the cousins Wink). Its extra piece of mind and in my personal experience I have traveled up and down Interstate 44 in Missouri and had more action on the CB than on my 2m rig. I'll be honest and say it is the opposite when I venture away from the interstate with more hits on the 2m than on the CB. But again, having a reliable outlet on and off the major interstates is nice!  Grin

Miles
KD0PBO
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W1JKA
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Posts: 1621




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« Reply #39 on: February 05, 2012, 02:39:56 AM »

  Search and Rescue KISS:CB for notification,reflective mirror/small lifevest type strobe light for day/nite location by air.I know, I've been there.
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ONAIR
Member

Posts: 1738




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« Reply #40 on: February 06, 2012, 08:10:30 PM »

Just to put it out there..

Missouri Highway Patrol still actively monitors CB 9 while on patrols. One of the few law enforcement groups left to do so (that I know of).

As some have mentioned earlier, having at least two outlets for communications is a really smart idea. The above fact about CB 9 is one reason I still have my CB in truck still (aside from having alittle fun out on the farm with the cousins Wink). Its extra piece of mind and in my personal experience I have traveled up and down Interstate 44 in Missouri and had more action on the CB than on my 2m rig. I'll be honest and say it is the opposite when I venture away from the interstate with more hits on the 2m than on the CB. But again, having a reliable outlet on and off the major interstates is nice!  Grin

Miles
KD0PBO
   I believe that police in NY and CT still monitor Channel 9 CB as well.
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K5SBR
Member

Posts: 2




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« Reply #41 on: February 07, 2012, 08:56:04 PM »

If the cell is dead, as well as VHF/UHF, then CB is also worthless. In over 50 years as a ham, I have never began a QSO, emergency or otherwise, on ANY so-called emergency calling frequency. At sea (a lot, solo under sail), 14300 is great, if there is propagation. The 7268 East Coast Waterway net at 0745 Eastern time is also great, if within range.

However, in my experience and that of many ham radio friends, you go find somebody you can hear and break into their QSO. At first, they may not believe your story...but stay with it. It at first you don't succeed, then try, try, try again.

All the "comments" (read: BS) about the "law" etc. doesn't make a hill of beans when YOU are in trouble and need communications. You, as a communicator, make it work.

Take it from one who has been there.

73 & best DX,

Ed, K5SBR
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K1DA
Member

Posts: 481




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« Reply #42 on: February 12, 2012, 08:42:54 AM »

I'm sure "Bonnie Encom" is monitoring 60 meters at all times.  Frankly, 14.300 is the place to find help.  CB can actually be useful far away from big cities when the band isn't open. Otherwise you have to put up with every nutjob on the planet.  If you can bring up a repeater, the regulations suggest a control op OUGHT to be listening.   
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ONAIR
Member

Posts: 1738




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« Reply #43 on: February 12, 2012, 10:59:33 AM »

I'm sure "Bonnie Encom" is monitoring 60 meters at all times.  Frankly, 14.300 is the place to find help.  CB can actually be useful far away from big cities when the band isn't open. Otherwise you have to put up with every nutjob on the planet.  If you can bring up a repeater, the regulations suggest a control op OUGHT to be listening.   
  If you are traveling across country and you get stuck near just about any road where there is truck traffic, you can usually catch one of them on CB channel 19.  Most truckers seem to keep their CBs on most of the time, so your chances of making a contact with one of them is actually quite good.
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KC8OYE
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Posts: 297




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« Reply #44 on: February 13, 2012, 11:29:04 PM »

to be honest, if 146.520 didn't work..

I'd probably start with 155.070 (local city police dispatch) yes, they are one of the VERY few places still running analog VHF.
since my mobile rigs are Motorola commercial radios, going outside the ham bands is no big deal...

county fire dispatch is on analog vhf still too.. in a true emergency, i'm positive I could attract some attention there! I can't recall the freq. right off the top of my head.. but it's in the mobile Smiley

I keep an 11m rig in the car.. 'just in case'.. it comes in handy while traveling at times... while not a good idea for regular use, I believe my 10m antenna is tuned closed enough to 11m to get the job done w/o smoking the 11m radio... (it's dead-on for 29.600) (I usually just listen to 11m when i need to)

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