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Author Topic: will metal siding on my house affect indoor antenna?  (Read 3684 times)
KD0WVC
Member

Posts: 32




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« on: October 29, 2011, 10:33:33 AM »

I also have metal studs.
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KB1GMX
Member

Posts: 713




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« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2011, 10:37:22 AM »

Yes.

The combined metal makes it an approximation of a Faraday cage.

IF your doing VHF (2m/440) operate from or near a window that points toward the
repeater of interest.

For best results outdoors antenna.  Second best is in the attic assuming the roof
isn't metal or  other conductive material.

Allison
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K6AER
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Posts: 3483




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« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2011, 10:42:16 AM »

yes...Yes...YES...YES....YES!
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KD0WVC
Member

Posts: 32




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« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2011, 12:02:39 PM »

then, would it be reasonable to make the siding my antenna? this is for receiving only.
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W8JI
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WWW

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« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2011, 03:54:27 PM »

then, would it be reasonable to make the siding my antenna? this is for receiving only.

Well, you could.

Peel two 20 foot pieces off the house and mount them on the roof, and feed them like a dipole.

Seriously, can't you install anything outside?
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KD0WVC
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Posts: 32




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« Reply #5 on: October 29, 2011, 04:11:39 PM »

Most people here that reply to my questions give good answers. Then there is W8JI. At this time, no, I can't install anything outdoors. Thanks to the others for your constructive feedback.
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KB4QAA
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« Reply #6 on: October 29, 2011, 04:22:20 PM »

Most people here that reply to my questions give good answers. Then there is W8JI. At this time, no, I can't install anything outdoors. Thanks to the others for your constructive feedback.
I apologize for W8JI.   He meant to say you should feed the panels as an inverted Vee.

Wink
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KD0WVC
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Posts: 32




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« Reply #7 on: October 29, 2011, 04:31:02 PM »

A couple of jokers, huh? Just to make it clear, I'm not offended or anything, it was a joke and that's how I took it. Gotta have a sense of humor.
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N4NYY
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Posts: 4742




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« Reply #8 on: October 29, 2011, 04:59:59 PM »

Quote
I apologize for W8JI.   He meant to say you should feed the panels as an inverted Vee.

What if he connects his coax to the siding and runs ground radials?

OK, I am kidding. Don't really do this.
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K7KBN
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Posts: 2764




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« Reply #9 on: October 29, 2011, 05:05:18 PM »

Since you don't like some of the answers you've received, and since there's no law against experimenting, why not go ahead and install your antenna indoors.  After you've tried that, connect the siding as your antenna. See what works and what doesn't.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
KD6KWZ
Member

Posts: 276




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« Reply #10 on: October 30, 2011, 01:04:52 AM »

I read an article years ago in Electronics Illustrated, where they were seeing how far they could reach on
11 meters CB from an airplane. They found the hard way the plane was a great Faraday cage. They had
to use a wire hanging out of the plane, problem solved.

And, from my AM BCB DX'ing experience, concrete buildings with metal rebar is also rather shielding of RF.
Even metal foil backed fiberglass insulation will weaken RF.
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WA3SKN
Member

Posts: 5437




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« Reply #11 on: October 31, 2011, 11:58:33 AM »

Yes, it will affect it.
Although it has been used as an antenna, it really is not a very practical one.  It is best to get the antenna clear of the house and high.  Note that most siding installations are grounded in some form.
If you describe your situation, we might be able to offer you suggestions.  What are you trying to receive?

-Mike.
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AA4HA
Member

Posts: 1378




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« Reply #12 on: November 01, 2011, 09:32:22 AM »

When my house was built it was wrapped in a thin foam backing with a metal foil backing. I had that wrapped with the Tyvekk vapor barrier wrap before they put in the windows or added the siding. Mostly it was to keep the house from being drafty and to add a little bit of R value to the walls. The siding I have is really concrete board that looks like siding.

Since the house was purchased 90% complete I had to add flooring and put down aluminum foil topped with Tyvekk (had lots of extra Tyvekk from the outside work). Then the wood flooring was put on top of the tyvekk/ aluminum foil.

The windows are all covered with the metallic film tint (for privacy and to keep the heat out).

All of it makes a noticeable difference in signal levels. On my front porch I can get four bars on my cellphone and hit the local 2 m and 70 cm repeaters on my HT. Inside the house the cellphone is 1 bar with spots where there is no signal and my HT cannot hit the repeaters, even when standing in front of one of the bay windows on the second floor.

It sort of makes me the tin-foil hat crowd. Over the last ten years I have probably saved more money due to energy efficiency than I spent on the house wrap. To keep the house quieter than usual the inside walls and floors also have fiberglass insulation so I cannot hear someone walking on the floor upstairs.

This winter I am going to tyvekk the floor joists (from underneath) in the crawl space to help keep the fiberglass batting in place and to make it whiter down there (pretty dark area). A few well placed LED lighting strips and the crawl space becomes a workable area. The front half of my crawl space has a 9 foot floor to ceiling, back half is at 4 feet (live on the side of a hill). If I had a means of getting into the front space from outside I could build a pretty good tornado shelter/ radio room in the crawl space area as there is a 15'x15' area that has a very high ceiling.
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
KD0NFY
Member

Posts: 75




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« Reply #13 on: November 01, 2011, 10:14:56 AM »

A loop under the eaves could make a decent receiving antenna and it wouldn't show.
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K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3669




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« Reply #14 on: November 01, 2011, 10:16:36 AM »

LEO6912:  
Quote
Most people here that reply to my questions give good answers. Then there is W8JI.

Quote
A couple of jokers, huh? Just to make it clear, I'm not offended or anything, it was a joke and that's how I took it.

My wife and I used to play CB.  She would talk all day on the CB but NEVER on my ham radio.  Why?  She said, "Because hams have no sense of humor and don't like to joke around."

Now, we have a could guys injecting a little humor and although you said "you're not offended" it sure as hell sounds like it!  Lighten up a little OM.  It isn't like you have flood waters lapping at your behind and you're trying to get an antenna up to yell for help!

You have a very interesting and valid question.  However, as ideas are presented, your situation become more complicated than originally stated or thought.  And so the attempts at humor.

Hang around and be patient. There's no doubt in my mind you'll either get a workable solution to your unique problem or an answer that is simply, "forget it."

« Last Edit: November 01, 2011, 10:19:28 AM by K8AXW » Logged
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