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Author Topic: And you think the code is dead ? think again !  (Read 7780 times)
STAYVERTICAL
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« Reply #30 on: November 09, 2011, 10:54:14 PM »


I am a solid digimodes user, but about six months ago, decided to dust off the paddle and refresh my cw skills, but did not expect to find much activity these days.
How wrong I was, there is more activity on CW than on the PSK31 bands.
For the last few months I have had a great time on CW and one of the interesting things I have discovered is the wider "spread" of CW operators compared to PSK31 ops.
When you have operated digimodes for many years you find the same group of guys (and gals) on the mode, and even bands.
But I notice that the "herd" of CW ops seems much larger.
In a few months of operating, I have worked about 10-20 different CW stations every day, on bands ranging from 40m to 10m.
10m for example on CW is much more active than 10m (28.120Mhz) psk31.
Now, I have FLdigi running on the PC, but strictly as a logging program, the CW is so much fun.

I have also found the average CW sending (and probably receiving speed) is about 20WPM, so you old timers and ex-pro's, please slow down for the new CW ops and give them a good experience.

For those who think CW is too hard - take me as an example - my brain is modelled on a fossilised exhibit in the museum of natural history, but I still managed to learn CW and am now at around 35WPM.
You can do it too, it just takes time and determination.

73s
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AE4RV
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« Reply #31 on: November 10, 2011, 07:34:17 AM »


I am a solid digimodes user, but about six months ago, decided to dust off the paddle and refresh my cw skills, but did not expect to find much activity these days.
How wrong I was, there is more activity on CW than on the PSK31 bands.

Understatement of the year. I think there are at least ten times more active CW ops than digimode users of all stripes. (Of course I wouldn't believe that during a RTTY contest...)

It really seems to me that the people who think CW is on the wane are not users.

And congrats to Stayvertical for 35WPM! I can copy callsigns at that speed but I can not carry on a conversation like that...
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K8AXW
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« Reply #32 on: November 10, 2011, 08:04:52 AM »

Quote
It really seems to me that the people who think CW is on the wane are not users.


Partly true..... I think the people who think CW is on the wane are the ones too impatient to learn CW.  Notice I didn't say, "Can't learn CW?"

It is the human factor that ridicules and demeans others to excuse ones own inadequacies rather it be laziness or impatience.

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AK7V
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« Reply #33 on: November 10, 2011, 09:22:21 AM »

I hope it's not dead.  I've got (hopefully) about 45 more years of hamming in front of me, as someone in his mid-30s, and I'm 99% CW.  No problems finding QSOs now.  Hope that won't change too much when I retire.

Maybe I'll be talking to CW ops using computers or cell phones or cybernetic brain implants -- but I'll keep to the paddles and enjoy the chat.
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N4MJG
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« Reply #34 on: November 12, 2011, 03:23:10 PM »

Guys !

I was listen on 3550  last night and the code still going !

At the same time i was still relearning again  so hopely i'll get hang of it again !!!!!  Grin

Jackie
N4MJG
Been Hamming 10 years !
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K8AXW
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« Reply #35 on: November 12, 2011, 08:54:46 PM »

I would like to inject another thought in this thread.  As I get older I find my fingers simply don't follow commands from the brain.  Or if they do, they're out of sync. 

This is a time to break out the keyboard to stay on CW.  I have also learned that there isn't anything better than the brain and ears, with suitable audio enhancement, either by hearing aids or an external processor to copy code.  No matter what the age.

The point I'm trying to make here is, if you need some electromechanical help with either sending or receiving then go for it.  Just don't give CW up. 

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PA0WV
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« Reply #36 on: November 13, 2011, 05:33:50 AM »

I would like to inject another thought in this thread.  As I get older I find my fingers simply don't follow commands from the brain.  Or if they do, they're out of sync.  

This is a time to break out the keyboard to stay on CW.  I have also learned that there isn't anything better than the brain and ears, with suitable audio enhancement, either by hearing aids or an external processor to copy code.  No matter what the age.

The point I'm trying to make here is, if you need some electromechanical help with either sending or receiving then go for it.  Just don't give CW up.  



Sure,

I designed a device (named MKB) using an old IBM PC keyboard, to produce CW (and also Feld Hell) plus 12 instantly changeable messages under F1 thru F12, and all the prosigns, and a contest counter. You can find it at
http://pa0wv.home.xs4all.nl/zelfbouw.html by clicking the link MKB.

Receiving is human work, the ability increases with age, because the bandwidth of your ears decreases. So nature helps you with increasing age with a CW filter. Only thing you have to do is choose the right pitch in the passband.

Remember the world champion produces 70 wpm on a home brew bug, rag chewing above 45 wpm is mostly and above 60 wpm  always done with keyboards. So don't feel embarrassed. Your code is better copied when generated by keyboard.
« Last Edit: November 13, 2011, 05:39:55 AM by PA0WV » Logged

Using an appliance without CW is just CB
N2EY
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Posts: 3879




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« Reply #37 on: November 13, 2011, 06:03:20 AM »

there is more activity on CW than on the PSK31 bands.

For another data point, just look at the ARRL Field Day results. Compare the number of reported CW, digital and 'phone QSOs.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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W6RMK
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« Reply #38 on: November 14, 2011, 06:34:25 AM »

there is more activity on CW than on the PSK31 bands.

For another data point, just look at the ARRL Field Day results. Compare the number of reported CW, digital and 'phone QSOs.

73 de Jim, N2EY

that's not a particularly random or well selected example if you're looking for relative quantities of operators.. It brings out a distinctly different population of operators than some random weekend day, for instance.

The 2x boost in points for CW Qs and the speed of contacts also pushes for it on a competitive FD operation.  In a contest, not only are the rules set up for CW, but you have a "critical mass" issue.  If you want a high score, you need to be operating a mode where there are others also seeking a high score AND in a good geographic location.

Maybe if you looked at FD, and looked at all the folks looking for a good time and non-competitive (i.e. throw out the top 10-15 in each bucket..and then look at the stats)
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N2EY
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« Reply #39 on: November 14, 2011, 06:56:24 AM »

there is more activity on CW than on the PSK31 bands.

For another data point, just look at the ARRL Field Day results. Compare the number of reported CW, digital and 'phone QSOs.

73 de Jim, N2EY

that's not a particularly random or well selected example if you're looking for relative quantities of operators.. It brings out a distinctly different population of operators than some random weekend day, for instance.

The 2x boost in points for CW Qs and the speed of contacts also pushes for it on a competitive FD operation.  In a contest, not only are the rules set up for CW, but you have a "critical mass" issue.  If you want a high score, you need to be operating a mode where there are others also seeking a high score AND in a good geographic location.

Maybe if you looked at FD, and looked at all the folks looking for a good time and non-competitive (i.e. throw out the top 10-15 in each bucket..and then look at the stats)

Digital QSOs count 2x on FD, same as CW. Digital is also a separate "band" from both 'phone and CW. Been that way for many years now - so where are the digital ops on FD?

I could see back in the early days when a computer cost more than a rig, but with inexpensive lappers nowadays that factor is gone.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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W5ESE
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« Reply #40 on: November 14, 2011, 09:49:14 AM »

Quote
that's not a particularly random or well selected example if you're looking for relative quantities of operators.. It brings out a distinctly different population of operators than some random weekend day, for instance.

I disagree with this; Field Day is a well-selected example precisely
because it draws out a large number of operators that do not
regularly participate in contests, and so it is a much more accurate
reflection of the hobby than the DX Contests, WPX, etc.
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STAYVERTICAL
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Posts: 864




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« Reply #41 on: November 14, 2011, 01:56:11 PM »

On using a keyboard for CW, I heartily agree.
I use a paddle or hand pump at the moment, but if I were to have physical problems which prevented me from sending CW
with them, I would certainly go to P.C. keying of CW to maintain my participation in this wonderful mode.

Sending is the public face of your CW ability and receiving the private side.
Many people place too much importance in the sending method and ignore the receiving side since it is normally invisible
to the public.
Morse is both an art and science, and is much more like learning a foreign language and customs than learning a technology.

From my participation in both the digimode and morse universes, morse is certainly alive and well.

May the morse be with you!

73s
 
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PA0BLAH
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« Reply #42 on: November 15, 2011, 10:06:37 AM »

Back to topic.

Is the code dead? No it is not.

Will the code be dead? Yes it will be (according to my opinion within 30 years)

Why ?
1. Because all present people that want the code be alive, I am one of them,  learned it COMPULSARY, as I did with amazing primitive circumstances listening to coastal  stations, without courses and training methods whatsoever.
When there was  no need to learn it in order to become a ham, or get the profession of radioOFFICER, they should not have done that. (I should not have learned it, sure not)
2. On www.lcwo.net you could in the past, when Koch lesson results were still public, easy see that from the 30000 subscribers right now, less than 1% finished the course, so that they can start to try to make a QSO.
3. On www.rufzxp.net you can notice young people streaming in,  photographs available, a hand full, but they are only interested in a sport and competition, not in communicating on the ham bands with moderate speeds or rag chewing   below 50 wpm, only in competing and outperforming  the other the top guys/gals. Exercising and training with personal and group coaches.

So what. What is the drive of people to educate other people the way of life THEY appreciate and like? You find it in religions and now also in a hobby which we, you and I, appreciate?

Every generation has its new reasons of fulfillment, May be contesting or being best in AVALARLY WEAPONS, one or other computer game that challenges eye ear hand coordination till they find Zen like experiences because the knobs of the blackberry becone a part of their body, just the reason your body is functioning the way it is because it is all in your brains to exitate the limbs till they are felt as part of your body.

« Last Edit: November 15, 2011, 10:36:20 AM by PA0BLAH » Logged
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