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Author Topic: USA Brings Home Gold at 2011 High Speed Telegraphy World Championships  (Read 3925 times)
AE4RV
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« on: November 06, 2011, 07:21:52 AM »

http://www.arrl.org/news/usa-brings-home-gold-at-2011-high-speed-telegraphy-world-championships

FTA:  Individuals all over the world compete in High Speed Telegraphy (HST) events where they are challenged to correctly receive and copy Morse code transmissions sent at very high speeds, upwards of 300 characters a minute. HST is very popular in Eastern Europe, but it is gaining ground all over the world, including the US.

How cool is that?

It's interesting to note that freely available software, RufzXP and Morse Runner are used in the competitions, and anyone can download and try them out.

73, Geoff
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WX7G
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« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2011, 01:35:12 PM »

Most excellent
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K9FV
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« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2011, 03:10:43 PM »


Let me say first of all that I am NOT a code person - 15 wpm is about the max I can think of sending, but I guess I'm missing something here, There are talking about speeds "upwards of 300 characters per minute" - at 5 characters per word, that's only 60 wpm - I sure was thinking there were folks who did "head copy" at that speed?  I must be wrong - what is the max "normal" copy for real hot shot code folks?

There was a line saying "100 letters per minute is equivalent to 25 words per minute" - that's only 4 characters per word, so maybe my 60 wpm statement above is not correct?

Fun to read about that stuff.

73 de Ken H>
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AK7V
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« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2011, 12:11:29 PM »

Congratulations!  I've been following the HST competition for several years and it's great to see a US team take home some medals!
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STAYVERTICAL
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« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2011, 07:14:27 PM »

I can't even think that fast!
Congratulations to the U.S. team.

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NI0C
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« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2011, 05:21:42 AM »

K9FV asked:
Quote
what is the max "normal" copy for real hot shot code folks?

Ken, see this article by W4BQF: http://sites.google.com/site/tomw4bqf/copyingcwover70wpm

73,
Chuck  NI0C
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W8JI
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« Reply #6 on: November 26, 2011, 05:12:10 AM »

K9FV asked:
Quote
what is the max "normal" copy for real hot shot code folks?

Ken, see this article by W4BQF: http://sites.google.com/site/tomw4bqf/copyingcwover70wpm

73,
Chuck  NI0C


If true, that tells me they are not really copying much of what is sent, and thus claiming copy is not entirely accurate.

This is from that page:
Quote
Although you will not be conscience of copying dots ad dashes, if the sender mis-spells a word, somehow your brain will notice that. Say the sender sends the word 'will' as w'E'll, your mind will notice that one dit that was missed, but you will have trained your brain to ignore that one missed dit, and it will continue copying. I'm not truely sure of this but I think somewhere above about 70 or 80 wpm, since your mind is now really in the 'flow of the conversation', you probably are not literally copying every word that is sent to you, but your brain is copying enough to make sense out of what is being said!]]
 


I'm disappointed that being able to put things in context of an exchange is considered copying high speed.

If that is true, I can easily copy 100 WPM or more. I don't consider that accurate, because I can only actually understand word groups at 60 WPM or so, and spelling slightly less.
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STAYVERTICAL
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« Reply #7 on: November 26, 2011, 05:53:04 AM »

I think that the brain is an adaptive wonder.
I have been slowly increasing my speed to where I can now read about 48WPM in my head.
I found that once you exceed about 35WPM increasing the speed is relatively easy, perhaps a psychological barrier has been breached, or perhaps the brain has allocated a section for code by that time.
It would be interesting to see what sections of the brain light up on a brain imaging scanner when a ham is listening to code, or language etc.
I am not however, volunteering!

Since I only read in my head, only writing down callsigns and name into my logger, I have found that I simply don't even have any awareness of dits and dahs anymore.
The whole experience, as I am sure many others will confirm, is like talking on voice, and after a day I could not tell you whether a particular conversation was voice or CW.

I especially notice when I am listening to a fist with a big "swing" that the normal cadence of CW copying disappears, and the words are just "sensed". I guess this is how high speed code guys work, but I am nowhere their their expertise, so this is just conjecture.

My technique of increasing speed is the "incompetence method", where I increase the speed of my sent code until I become unable to copy it, then continue listening until I start to pick out characters and words.
I then back off the speed slightly and find I can now read higher speeds than before.

When you read code, I think you are really exercising your brain, making new pathways, and increasing your memory ability - probably making you more intelligent and less prone to brain diseases of aging.

And if nothing else, you will have a skill which is still mysterious to the public at large, who don't even realise that nokia messaging sends SMS when receiving a text message!

73s

« Last Edit: November 26, 2011, 05:58:02 AM by STAYVERTICAL » Logged
NI0C
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« Reply #8 on: November 26, 2011, 07:56:40 AM »

Responding to Tom, W8JI's comments above--

I agree with you concerning use of the word "copy."  What is described in the article is conversational CW at high speeds, using head copy.  Of course the context of a conversation helps one to provide mental "fills" for an occasional word that was missed at first.  If you want to practice copying uncorrelated words where decoding each letter of a word is mandatory, try the "Word Training" option at Learn CW Online: http://lcwo.net/  

I think the point of Tom's (W4BQF) excellent article was to encourage others how to develop their code skills.  I used to spend a lot of time listening to his QRQ conversations on 40 meters, as it provided good practice.  Thus, his honesty in the article did not disappoint me at all.

73,
Chuck  NI0C
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NI0C
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« Reply #9 on: November 26, 2011, 10:23:40 AM »

STAYVERTICAL wrote:
Quote
When you read code, I think you are really exercising your brain, making new pathways, and increasing your memory ability - probably making you more intelligent and less prone to brain diseases of aging.

I don't know if there's any evidence for what are saying, but I do hope you are right!

73,
Chuck  NI0C
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W5UXH
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« Reply #10 on: November 26, 2011, 02:25:34 PM »



I'm disappointed that being able to put things in context of an exchange is considered copying high speed.

If that is true, I can easily copy 100 WPM or more. I don't consider that accurate, because I can only actually understand word groups at 60 WPM or so, and spelling slightly less.

Curious: are you saying that you can understand a conversation at 100 WPM?  Pretty impressive, not many can do that.  I know W4BQF at least used to be able to qso at such speeds.  From my perspective it is valid for one to say they are "copying" at what ever speed information is clearly exchanged in a qso. 

I have a daily qso with a friend at 60 wpm, usually for about an hour.   But I have zero interest in being able to copy call signs at high speeds or random word groups etc. at any speed (and am unable to do either).  My interest in operating CW is to use it on the air in qso at whatever speed.  I can't begin to do it at 100 wpm though.  I can't even follow another qso at 80 wpm, so my "copy" limit (using my definition) is in the 60 to 65 range max.

73,

Chuck, W5UXH


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K0TF
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« Reply #11 on: December 11, 2011, 11:30:34 PM »

http://www.arrl.org/news/usa-brings-home-gold-at-2011-high-speed-telegraphy-world-championships

FTA:  Individuals all over the world compete in High Speed Telegraphy (HST) events where they are challenged to correctly receive and copy Morse code transmissions sent at very high speeds, upwards of 300 characters a minute. HST is very popular in Eastern Europe, but it is gaining ground all over the world, including the US.

How cool is that?

It's interesting to note that freely available software, RufzXP and Morse Runner are used in the competitions, and anyone can download and try them out.

73, Geoff

Funny, just rechecked http://rufzxp.net/toplist.htm and failed to see any of the gold medalists call signs in the list. How cool is THAT?
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WA8JXM
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« Reply #12 on: December 12, 2011, 06:32:41 AM »

FWIW, I've heard that the old press wireless ops could copy 100 wpm on the mill, and carry on a conversation at the same time.

I know when I used to print copy, sometimes my mind would wander and I would have to look down at the paper to see what had been said.  I believe my brain was processing the sounds and my fingers would move in response to that.   It's not hard to imagine someone's fingers hitting the keyboard in auto response to certain sound combinations.

Ken
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AE4RV
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« Reply #13 on: December 13, 2011, 11:14:46 AM »

Funny, just rechecked http://rufzxp.net/toplist.htm and failed to see any of the gold medalists call signs in the list. How cool is THAT?

I found all of the USA team's calls there, including W2UP who took home Gold in the pileup competition and Bronze in the RUFFZ competition. I also see your callsign very high on the Toplist. Congratulations.

73, Geoff

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