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Author Topic: All mode radio for 50 MHZ and above?  (Read 3207 times)
N5RWJ
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Posts: 461




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« on: November 07, 2011, 04:41:16 PM »

What capability would you want from this all mode 50 MHZ and above radio ,and what would you expect to pay for it?
  Note: This only to show manufacture what you want.
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KD5KFL
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« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2011, 06:16:28 PM »

the ability to operate dual band - 144 uplink, 432 downlink - for satellites
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KQ6EA
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« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2011, 09:54:51 PM »

Geeez.....how many threads are you going to start on this topic?
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KA1MDA
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« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2011, 12:20:25 AM »

I would want it to have all the features of my Kenwood TS-2000X.. maybe throw in a really nice general coverage receiver, maybe HF band coverage.. and it should be priced well below the cost of an Icom 910..

Oh , wait- the TS-2000X already does all that, and already sells for way below an Icom 910..
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N5RWJ
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« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2011, 09:25:50 AM »

Geeez.....how many threads are you going to start on this topic?
I didn't post this here, site boss did?
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N5RWJ
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« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2011, 09:27:26 AM »

I would want it to have all the features of my Kenwood TS-2000X.. maybe throw in a really nice general coverage receiver, maybe HF band coverage.. and it should be priced well below the cost of an Icom 910..

Oh , wait- the TS-2000X already does all that, and already sells for way below an Icom 910..
This radio is for 50 MHZ and above.
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KQ6EA
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« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2011, 09:58:00 AM »

My mistake. There's another thread over in "Satellites" regarding a new radio, and along with the post on the (defunct) Ten Tec 526, I got them all jumbled together.

I agree, a new 50 and up all-mode radio would be a wonderous thing to have if it was a good one.
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20636




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« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2011, 06:52:56 PM »

The TS-2000 fills this application pretty well.  It also covers HF, but that's easy to ignore if you don't want to use it.

I cannot imagine the possibility of making a 50-144-432-1296 rig that could be manufactured for a lower cost point.

I have an FT-736R that covers those four bands, but adding the 50 and 1296 MHz modules was expensive, and the resulting rig cost about $2500 or so which is probably why there aren't millions of them out there.
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N5RWJ
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« Reply #8 on: November 12, 2011, 03:36:19 PM »

It will cost less without HF and have less noise.
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KB1GMX
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« Reply #9 on: November 12, 2011, 06:25:39 PM »

>It will cost less without HF and have less noise.

What makes you say that?     The only down side to having HF is a bias to HF  and the likelihood of features that VHF and UHF users may not need or desire.  The flexibility for other modes and
bands is hard to dispute. 

Right now  do everything radios exist and the TS2K is not the only one but it is getting
long in the tooth.

HF is valid and who knows if someone will put up another sat like the RS series that had
10M!

On the other end a good radio for a more limited set of bands and a dual receive that can run on split bands is very useful for SAT work.  That and transverters for higher bands is a known way to build a good station on UHF and up.  The real trick is having a radio with a transverter friendly interface (TR signal, low TX power like 1mW and resetable tuning).  A radio like that can be cheaper to make.


Allison
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K9KJM
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« Reply #10 on: November 12, 2011, 11:09:40 PM »

I would want it to have all the features of my Kenwood TS-2000X.. maybe throw in a really nice general coverage receiver, maybe HF band coverage.. and it should be priced well below the cost of an Icom 910..

Oh , wait- the TS-2000X already does all that, and already sells for way below an Icom 910..

YEP!  Exactly. 

Yes, The TS 2000 IS getting kind of old and in some ways outdated.  But as of right now, NO ONE makes a replacement radio that can do all that the TS2K can!  At least anywhere near the same low cost.
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K9KJM
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« Reply #11 on: November 12, 2011, 11:19:01 PM »


Right now  do everything radios exist and the TS2K is not the only one but it is getting
long in the tooth.

Allison


Show me another radio besides the TS 2000 that has true dual receive (Is actually two radios in one box) and can cross band repeat in the same price range.

I suspect lots of folks simply do not understand the many advantages of being able to cross band repeat- Being able to monitor (And talk back) on 6 meters from a hand held on UHF,   Continue on with a 75 meter net while walking around the neighborhood with a little hand held, Extend the range of your hand held on VHF from your tall base antenna while loafing around the house with a small hand held, Etc etc etc.  Cross band repeat gives you a "wireless" microphone/speaker for your base station radio that can range a long ways out.
Many miles out from a base to a mobil. Many blocks out to a flea powered hand held with rubber duck antenna.
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #12 on: November 14, 2011, 09:06:07 AM »

It will cost less without HF and have less noise.

That's not true at all.

VHF-UHF "all mode" transceivers actually are HF transceivers, converted to VHF/UHF by additional mixing and filtering.  The only ones that aren't are single-band very simple stuff like the MFJ low powered transceivers.  Even the "VHF-UHF ONLY"  FT-736R, a favorite among weak signal operators, is actually an HF transceiver inside.  It has four VHF-UHF transverter circuits that switch in to follow what is essentially an HF rig in the chassis; it just has no external HF antenna connection (nor any HF power amplifiers or filters).  It's done this way because it's an easy, inexpensive, versatile, high-performance way to do it.

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