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Author Topic: short wave listening as a hobby is finished.  (Read 67060 times)
K6JHU
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Posts: 27




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« Reply #45 on: May 05, 2015, 04:49:29 PM »

Just like there are people still using hardwired landline phones and others restoring old Model T's, AM and SW will never go away (unless WRC mandates it). AM and SW will still exist, and there will still be broadcasters, but both AM and SW will be relegated to the backwaters of communications. And not much can be done at this point to bring either back.
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KD8IIC
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Posts: 284




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« Reply #46 on: May 05, 2015, 09:29:02 PM »

  Interesting note on how times have changed and all. I was reading the history of the pioneer Christian SW broadcast station HCJB in Quito, Ecuador. Even the Good Lord has said move on to the internet as shortwave was finished as a way to spread the gospel with efficiency. HCJB is no longer broadcasting but is now internet based.
Dislike changes as we all may, we must come to grips with reality. 73   Smiley

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AE6RO
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Posts: 160




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« Reply #47 on: May 06, 2015, 08:32:52 AM »

Oh, I don't know. Not every country  has given up on shortwave radio or staked their fates on the Internet. I listened this morning and there were tons of stations on, despite the historically poor propagation we have now.

Trouble is, none of them are in English. Hardly any Spanish.  It's mostly Chinese, Korean, and a host of  other Asian languages.  Not so dumb, methinks. John
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K5TED
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Posts: 982




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« Reply #48 on: May 08, 2015, 07:33:39 PM »

Almost three years later, the OP is still wrong about SWL.
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KJ6ZOL
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Posts: 553




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« Reply #49 on: May 08, 2015, 11:54:42 PM »

Oh, I don't know. Not every country  has given up on shortwave radio or staked their fates on the Internet. I listened this morning and there were tons of stations on, despite the historically poor propagation we have now.

Trouble is, none of them are in English. Hardly any Spanish.  It's mostly Chinese, Korean, and a host of  other Asian languages.  Not so dumb, methinks. John

The Asian stn's used to play some traditional music. I remember about 15 years ago I was up really late into the night so I pulled out the trusty DX440. The only thing I heard was a Chinese domestic stn playing what apparently was a Chinese violin. It was kinda spooky TBH, hearing that music at 1 am Pacific time. I haven't heard Asian music in SW in a long time. The Russians don't seem to like playing music.
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HFCRUSR
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Posts: 168




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« Reply #50 on: May 09, 2015, 08:39:51 AM »

They still play a ton of music on Asian BCs. Right now I have 12025kHz Radio Free Asia doing that wacky violin stuff with all the banging too.
In my early morning, there are several down in the 80m ham band through 4-5megs too that play Asian music.
I can fire up the radio and catch Asian music pretty much any time of the day here.
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RENTON481
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Posts: 103




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« Reply #51 on: May 11, 2015, 04:39:36 PM »

They still play a ton of music on Asian BCs. Right now I have 12025kHz Radio Free Asia doing that wacky violin stuff with all the banging too.

You're probably hearing the Chinese jammer "Firedrake". It's a high powered Chinese station that jams Radio Free Asia and other broadcasts into China.

They play non-stop Chinese classical music, which is actually quite cool sounding music.

There are SW enthusiasts that actually track Firedrake broadcasts, because there have been times Firedrake has inexplicably been off the air. Also, they seem to have changed the recording they use - it sounds different from the one they played two years ago.

I often hear Arabic music during late afternoons and early evenings, usually on the 25 and 21 meter bands. And sometimes AIR India plays their 'movie music' -- All India Radio can sometimes be heard here on the west coast of the U.S. during early evening or early morning.
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HFCRUSR
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Posts: 168




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« Reply #52 on: May 11, 2015, 06:48:39 PM »

Ya think so? Could be, and I was assuming it was R Free Asia according to the NASWA at that time. It remains that I hear a bunch of Asian music here daily and being on the left coast makes them huge signals.
That Firedrake shows up in the strangest areas! Often below or above the usual SWBC bands.
That morning the signal was +30 over and I even heard some RTTY type jamming under it.
Maybe the jammer was jamming the jammer jamming the intended jamee Grin
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KJ6ZOL
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Posts: 553




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« Reply #53 on: May 12, 2015, 05:58:01 PM »

I often hear Arabic music during late afternoons and early evenings, usually on the 25 and 21 meter bands. And sometimes AIR India plays their 'movie music' -- All India Radio can sometimes be heard here on the west coast of the U.S. during early evening or early morning.

Saudi Arabia would broadcast morning prayers around 0300 UTC, years ago. It would come in, weak but audible, in California. Started out with Quranic chanting, then a newscast, then prayers until the rising sun in SA would wipe out the signal around 0430. Apparently that particular tx fell victim to budget cuts about 7 years ago or so. I guess some princeling needed a new set of gold faucets or something.  Roll Eyes But yeah, the Middle East is audible during late afternoon/early evening in the US, which is predawn for them. Once the sun rises on their end, the signals go away. I find that All India Radio is extremely difficult to catch in CA. I've only heard them once or twice.
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K8QV
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Posts: 63




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« Reply #54 on: May 16, 2015, 10:49:50 AM »

I miss the Cold War broadcasts. Propaganda from the soviets and propaganda from the VOA. Good times. I still can find some stations with mediocre ham antennas and even just a whip on the radio. There are fewer stations, however, in my estimation. I also have trouble finding 8-track tapes. Time/technology marches on!
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WW7KE
Member

Posts: 190




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« Reply #55 on: May 16, 2015, 05:55:24 PM »

I miss the Cold War broadcasts. Propaganda from the soviets and propaganda from the VOA. Good times. I still can find some stations with mediocre ham antennas and even just a whip on the radio. There are fewer stations, however, in my estimation. I also have trouble finding 8-track tapes. Time/technology marches on!

There are fewer broadcast stations that Americans and Europeans would be more likely to listen to.  The South American and African tropical band stations have moved to FM for the most part (but not all).  But the Asians are still thriving, and will be for many years to come, especially the Chinese.  But most foreign stations that might be of interest to "the first world" are online now.

There are more bands, they are wider, and in some cases the broadcasts are longer than in decades past, however.  It's just that SWBC's day in the English- and Spanish-speaking world is just about over.  Technology does march on in our world, but not yet on the other side of the planet.
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KC8MWG
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Posts: 99




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« Reply #56 on: July 11, 2015, 05:32:11 PM »

There are still a few shortwave stations in the USA, mainly Christian broadcasting from what I have heard, as well as (mostly) right-wing political shows along the same vein as Rush Limbaugh.
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KQ4YA
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Posts: 32


WWW

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« Reply #57 on: July 12, 2015, 05:07:05 AM »

SWL as a hobby has a distinct disadvantage not shared with most other hobbies. When it comes to shortwave listening, the hobbyist has no control over the inevitable dying out of commercial stations.

For ham operators, you can work toward attracting more members; same deal with almost any other hobby from collecting stamps to catching butterflies. The hobbyist can work toward keeping the hobby alive.

But the SWL hobbyist can work as hard as he wishes but still can't control the fact that the landscape is changing for the worse.

So the hobbyists will have to do the changing - instead of changing the hobby they'll have to change how they practice the hobby. For the time being there are utility stations, broadcast band DX, etc. But even much of that will disappear over time as information finds more efficient platforms for transport such as the Internet.

I'm not at all pleased with this, but it seems inevitable that the hobby will diminish greatly, even compared to what it has already dipped to now. Will it die? I don't think so. But it's already a tiny niche and that niche will contract even more.
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W7AIT
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Posts: 495




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« Reply #58 on: July 16, 2015, 02:49:12 PM »

See PBS NOVA TV episode on excessive space junk.  We are almost to the point where no more satellites can safely be orbited, and that happens in the next few years.  Guess what, when they can't get satellites up to support the web, cell phones, whatever, HF will become relevant again.  Just wait a few years.  And if the Chinese blow up more space satellites making 10,000 more pieces, it'll happen much sooner.  Give it time, bet SWL / HF comes back into vogue again.
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AE4RV
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Posts: 985


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« Reply #59 on: July 21, 2015, 12:32:57 PM »

See PBS NOVA TV episode on excessive space junk.  We are almost to the point where no more satellites can safely be orbited, and that happens in the next few years.  Guess what, when they can't get satellites up to support the web, cell phones, whatever, HF will become relevant again.  Just wait a few years.  And if the Chinese blow up more space satellites making 10,000 more pieces, it'll happen much sooner.  Give it time, bet SWL / HF comes back into vogue again.

I love HF and don't want SWLing to go away but, we'll cover the planet with fiber and cell towers before satellites become impractical. Or, very shortly after they do...

As for non-communication/tv sats, they are not typically in the crowded geosynchronous orbit. Maybe HF will regain popularity with ships...
« Last Edit: July 21, 2015, 12:35:53 PM by AE4RV » Logged
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