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Author Topic: What was your first shortwave radio?  (Read 110194 times)
VE9DAN
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Posts: 1




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« Reply #135 on: August 09, 2014, 05:22:00 AM »

My first receiver was a 1968 TRIO 9R-59 complete with big knobs, and a wide dial.
I don't recall it being too good for SSB.
Radio Havana Cuba DX Club was a great program, as were others from Sophia, London, and Berne.
Great memories!
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KK5DR
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Posts: 57


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« Reply #136 on: August 10, 2014, 02:58:08 PM »

I was in the 7th grade. My dad was a junk collector, went to the landfill weekly to look for "good stuff" as he called (yes, they would let the public come in and take stuff out back then). He found an old Panasonic receiver (don't recall the model), it didn't work. Me, being a tinkerer with intense interest in all things electrical, I opened it up and found a broken wire from the battery holder. This wire also fed power from the AC mains power supply to the receiver. Fixing the wire got the unit going again.
The radio had several bands some of which were 80,41,40,21,20,11,10,6mtrs & FM broadcast bands. It was AM/FM only.
Next I attached a long wire to the telescopic antenna and strung it out my bedroom window and up a big tree there. I spent many hours listening to hams, truckers, CAP, and broadcasts on HF.
I thought about how cool it would be to do what these folks were doing.
I was a novice back when I was in the 5th grade, and CW seemed to come easy to me back then, so I would listen in on the CW sections also, deciphering the code as if it was covert messages in WW2. My novice ticket had lapsed a few years earlier and my family didn't have money to buy me any radio gear to transmit on. Besides, I had other priorities at that age.
I recall that doing SWL light the spark in me to one day get a ham ticket and keep at it till I could do what those cool guy were doing.
Now, I do just that.
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KX4OM
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Posts: 11




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« Reply #137 on: August 17, 2014, 06:45:20 PM »

Hammarlund SP-400 Super Pro. It was also my Novice receiver in 1960. My 7175 kilocycles crystal in the Heathkit DX-20 shared the frequency with Radio Moscow at night. Twinlead 40m folded dipole at 15' suspended from the eaves of the house to a bamboo pole. That super Pro was a real beast. The separate power supply weighed about 70 pounds. The SP-600 that I was gifted by my XYL's uncle Bob, WB4MHG (SK) was a portable receiver in comparison.

Ted, KX4OM
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KB0RDL
Member

Posts: 26




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« Reply #138 on: August 18, 2014, 05:18:45 AM »

Mine was a National NC-60.  It looked sophisticated for the time (1960) but it was a very basic shortwave receiver with a VFO for listening to sideband.  It cost about $100.  I knew nothing about radio when I bought it but learned the basics in short order.  I had it for about 10 years.  I have an ICOM R75 Now.

Laird Wilcox, kb0rdl
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W2MR
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Posts: 4




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« Reply #139 on: August 25, 2014, 11:26:29 AM »

My dad borrowed a Hallicrafters S-40B receiver from my uncle. Later he bought me my very own Hallicrafters Sx-25.   
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WA2ISE
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Posts: 143




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« Reply #140 on: September 04, 2014, 12:45:40 PM »

I had a console pull 5 or 6 octal tube SW set, with a power transformer.  The sort sold just before WW2.  I'd receive the big flamethrowers like the station from South Africa, with the chirping bird or such just before the top of the hour.  This around the early 70's. 
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K5WLR
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Posts: 98




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« Reply #141 on: September 04, 2014, 01:22:18 PM »

Well, back in 1966, when the SAT was accomplished on stone tablets and dinosaurs ruled the earth, my parents gave me a phonograph with a radio that included shortwave bands. Got to listen to shortwave broadcasts. Then my friend Greg sold me his old Knightkit Star Roamer when he purchased a Realistic DX-150. The Star Roamer was kind of deaf (10 uv sensitivity) but I got to hear more shortwave bands. Then I got my own DX-150 and I was off to the races!!!!

BTW, I have a Star Roamer and a DX-160 down in the basement!

Grin

Well, the Star Roamer and the DX-160 are now out of the basement and hooked up in the ham shack/bedroom. The old Star Roamer might have been deaf, but it sure does pull the AM stations in. Too bad the pickings are so slim these days. The DX-160 has to have the most generous S meter in the world... it pins on just about every signal. Sure does look nice, though!

Just having fun reminiscing.....  Smiley

73!

Will Rogers
K5WLR
Almost 40 years of hamming and just getting started!
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N3WAK
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Posts: 278




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« Reply #142 on: September 04, 2014, 02:28:36 PM »

Will:  Good for you setting up those old rigs again!  I'm with you!  I'm all for the nostalgia factor, too. Those rigs of our youth just sound better than ever.

73, Tony
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K5WLR
Member

Posts: 98




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« Reply #143 on: September 04, 2014, 02:48:08 PM »

Will:  Good for you setting up those old rigs again!  I'm with you!  I'm all for the nostalgia factor, too. Those rigs of our youth just sound better than ever.

73, Tony

Thanks, Tony. You should see my HR-10B, HW-16, DX-60B, Drake 2B, and SB303/SB401 rigs... lots of nostalgia there.

73!

Will
K5WLR
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K4JPN
Member

Posts: 18




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« Reply #144 on: September 14, 2014, 04:21:53 AM »

My first radio was a one tube battery powered regenerative, that K1EII helped me build for Boy Scout Radio Merit Badge in 1960.  I heard Radio Moscow announce the U2 spy plane being shot down on it.  I could pick up hams and SW stations and I was hooked.   I later in 1960 built on my own a Knight Kit Span Master, I heard all sorts of SW signals and hams.  This led to getting my license as KN1VKW at 15 years old in 1962.  Later in 1962 I passed my General and became K1VKW.  All this I owe to that simple 1 tube regenerative receiver.  Smiley  K4JPN
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K5NOK
Member

Posts: 19




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« Reply #145 on: September 14, 2014, 03:09:12 PM »

At age 13, I found an old tube AM broadcast radio receiver in the attic. It had an antenna post in the back and I hooked up a piece of wire from it to my curtain rod. I was fascinated that I could hear stations all over the US at night from Houston.
I graduated on to a Realistic DX 160 and heard Radio Moscow, Radio ROK, HCJB and many others. I also strayed into the  ham bands and heard guys talking about their Drakes, Collins and Yaesu radios.
I was hooked on pulling signals out of the air with just a piece of copper. Unfortunately, it was 30 years before I became a ham.
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K1ZJH
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Posts: 978




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« Reply #146 on: September 15, 2014, 10:14:51 AM »

Lafayette KT-200 (HE-10 kit version) around 1960 or 1961. Moved up to a HR-10 when I got the novice license. For nostalgia, I recently picked up a HE-10 and even a HE-30 to relive those early days... time sure gives us rose colored glasses when viewing the past.  I can't imagine what young novices went through to make contacts back in those days with such horrible ham rigs.

Pete
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K1FPV
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Posts: 33




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« Reply #147 on: September 15, 2014, 02:32:10 PM »

I started with the Knight Kit Span Master, later graduated to a Knight Kit R-55 and eventually used a T-60 with it as a novice. I still use the Span Master from time to time. I have since bought a used HE-10 and KT-320 for nostalgia sake and restored them. Real radios that glow in the dark!   Wink

Bill/K1FPV
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KD8UEI
Member

Posts: 5




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« Reply #148 on: September 16, 2014, 12:51:56 PM »

My first somewhat serious shortwave receiver was the Radio Shack Realistic DX-100. By today's standards, it was nothing to write home about. Through the years, I've had many radios that included SW bands on them, many as an afterthought, but my favorite SW radio was the Grundig Yacht Boy 400. Most recently, I have the Tecsun PL-660.
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ONAIR
Member

Posts: 1741




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« Reply #149 on: September 17, 2014, 06:22:31 PM »

Remember getting a battery powered pegboard electronics kit from Lafayette Radio.  One project on it was a one tube AM receiver, with coils for either the BCB or SW bands!  To my surprise (after throwing a long wire antenna out my window), Radio Australia came barreling in!!  Still remember hearing that bird they played at the beginning of their broadcasts.
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