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Author Topic: Movies with radio communication.  (Read 15262 times)
LB5KE
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Posts: 141




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« on: November 17, 2011, 03:25:27 PM »

What is you favorite movie scene involving radio communication?

Her are some i can think of :

1 The scene in Independence day where hams are helping out and communicating with CW.

2 Bruce Willis in Die hard using a simple FM transceiver.

3 I also like the start of Alien, where Sigourney Weaver are calling Antarctica.

4 The thing, where the radio operator is unable to get any contact
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KD8FTH
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« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2011, 09:41:04 AM »

The movie Frequency.  The entire concept of the movie is a guy talking via ham radio to his father in the past.  Because of this communication they are able to alter the present.  Has Dennis Quaid as the dad.  If you haven't seen it it is a very good movie.

Just my two cents....

73

Ron
KD8FTH
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N2EY
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Posts: 3880




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« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2011, 10:36:07 AM »

Contact

The Dish

Island In The Sky

On The Beach (well, sort-of)

Kon-Tiki (you can watch the entire documentary on YouTube)

The Dambusters (the 'Star Wars' Death Star attack sequence is a tribute to it)

A Night To Remember

73 de Jim, N2EY
« Last Edit: November 18, 2011, 12:13:52 PM by N2EY » Logged
2E0OZI
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« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2011, 11:56:48 AM »

I used to live near (well 100 kms) near Parkes Radio Telescope and "The Dish" always brings a tear to my eye. I visited 3 times and its a nice little museum/facility.

I very much identify with Ellie Arroway - despite being of the opposite gender and never making it as a scientist....
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AE4RV
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Posts: 961


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« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2011, 12:19:09 PM »

Contact

The Dish

Island In The Sky

On The Beach (well, sort-of)

Kon-Tiki (you can watch the entire documentary on YouTube)

The Dambusters (the 'Star Wars' Death Star attack sequence is a tribute to it)

A Night To Remember

73 de Jim, N2EY

Good list, Jim. I read Kon Tiki as a child and the radio contacts were fascinating and unforgettable. I also vividly remember some scenes from a made for TV movie about Amelia Earhart when they were trying to re-establish contact with her at the end.

How about Apollo 13?
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N2EY
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« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2011, 02:16:05 PM »

I read Kon Tiki as a child and the radio contacts were fascinating and unforgettable. I also vividly remember some scenes from a made for TV movie about Amelia Earhart when they were trying to re-establish contact with her at the end.

How about Apollo 13?

The KT movie is pretty good. I never realized how tiny the raft really was until I saw the movie. The radio ops did some pretty amazing things during WW2, as well.

Amelia Earhart was the textbook example of a bold pilot who never became an old pilot. It is pretty clear that she really didn't understand radio all that well, particularly RDF, and tossed out valuable gear (like the trailing-wire radio antenna) that could have saved their lives. She also repeatedly ignored what her navigator tried to tell her.

Apollo 13 is a good one.

Add "633 Squadron" to the list.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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KE4DRN
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« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2011, 03:44:58 PM »

hi,

War of the Worlds, 1938 Radio Program
War of the Worlds, 1953 Movie

2001: A Space Odyssey 1968
Dr. Floyd makes a video call to his daughter via AT&T
while on Space Station  #5.

I also agree Apollo 13, interesting article on Apollo 13

http://www.universetoday.com/62339/13-things-that-saved-apollo-13/

73 james
« Last Edit: November 18, 2011, 04:04:40 PM by KE4DRN » Logged
AC4RD
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Posts: 1235




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« Reply #7 on: November 19, 2011, 07:03:17 AM »

Amelia Earhart was the textbook example of a bold pilot who never became an old pilot. It is pretty clear that she really didn't understand radio all that well, particularly RDF, and tossed out valuable gear

I've read most of the books about Earhart, and the only recent one that I'd recommend to anybody else is by W7FT and his wife--there was a mention of it in CQ back when the Longs' book came out.  Long did a great job of finding source material, and a great job of writing it up clearly.   Long's analysis of what realy happened is well-reasoned and (IMO) entirely convincing.   And he says pretty much the same as you did, about AE's indifference to radio, and the results.   _Amelia Earhart: The Mystery Solved_ is (IIRC) the name of the book, and it's fascinating reading if you're interested in radio communications OR Earhart.  Thumbs up!  
« Last Edit: November 19, 2011, 12:28:12 PM by AC4RD » Logged
ONAIR
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Posts: 1744




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« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2011, 10:47:44 AM »

What is you favorite movie scene involving radio communication?

Her are some i can think of :

1 The scene in Independence day where hams are helping out and communicating with CW.

2 Bruce Willis in Die hard using a simple FM transceiver.

3 I also like the start of Alien, where Sigourney Weaver are calling Antarctica.

4 The thing, where the radio operator is unable to get any contact
  Not sure of the name of the film, but there is an old Will Rogers movie where Rogers works at some kind of a radio station, delivers batteries to people with radio receivers, and is involved with a strange radio apparatus.
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K5WLR
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« Reply #9 on: November 19, 2011, 12:27:32 PM »

Well, Independence Day was interesting. Can you imagine the "glass arms" created by holding your arm straight out to the top of the consoles while sending CW? Five minutes of that would make my arm fall off!!!

 Grin
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20599




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« Reply #10 on: November 19, 2011, 12:47:04 PM »

Well, Independence Day was interesting. Can you imagine the "glass arms" created by holding your arm straight out to the top of the consoles while sending CW? Five minutes of that would make my arm fall off!!!

 Grin
I thought it was great that they mentioned ham radio operators, this was a huge plus for that movie, to me.

But if you watched them sending on straight keys, it looked like they were going about 10 wpm and the "message" they were sending would have taken an hour!



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MAGNUM257
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Posts: 159




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« Reply #11 on: November 20, 2011, 04:43:36 AM »

"Phenomenon" with John Travolta. He breaks a secret code while listening to his friends HAM radio, then gets taken in by the Government and his friends radio equipment is confiscated. I wonder if he got it back?
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AD6KA
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Posts: 2237




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« Reply #12 on: November 23, 2011, 10:51:12 AM »

Well, not exactly a movie.....

But I enjoy the WWII history programs on
the Military Channel where they show various resistance
groups in occupied countries who used simple CW gear cleverly
hidden in everyday items, like books. They were used to communicate
enemy troop & equipment movements through that sector,
and to relay messages from other resistance cells.

If the Germans found such radios (and they searched
for them) it was a death sentence for the radio operator
or anyone having such a radio....sometimes the whole family
was killed as an example if it was the SS who caught them.

Those resistance fighters had stones.

Same for the guys (usually one or two, often just
one) encamped on small islands in the Pacific
in Japanese waters. They watched for enemy ship
and aircraft operations and transmitted the info to
HQ or a ship relay. Not a cushy job, those islands were
diffcult to supply, and conditions were miserable.
The Japanese knew the watchers were around and
often swept those islands with troops if they could DF
the signals. Many of those Coastal Watchers were Aussies.

73, Ken  AD6KA
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N2EY
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Posts: 3880




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« Reply #13 on: November 23, 2011, 12:14:24 PM »

I used to live near (well 100 kms) near Parkes Radio Telescope and "The Dish" always brings a tear to my eye. I visited 3 times and its a nice little museum/facility.

I live almost as far away as one can get from Parkes and I get choked up....The scene where Sam Neill as an old man visits.....

Folks make a big deal about "beauty" in the form of paintings, sculptures, natural features and such. And I agree with most of them.

But I see something like The Dish and it is beautiful too.

A visit to Parkes is on my bucket list.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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LB5KE
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Posts: 141




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« Reply #14 on: January 03, 2012, 03:24:46 PM »

Alistair MacLean's Bear Island.
 
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0078836/

There a several scenes with HF radios.
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