Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2] 3 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Why are all HT 5watt or less?  (Read 10471 times)
KB2HSH
Member

Posts: 229


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #15 on: November 30, 2011, 05:52:14 AM »

20 years ago, while in college, I bought an Alinco DJ-120T that could do 7+ with an external power supply or the BIG battery.  When it was in high power setting, the back got VERY hot.  Great rig though.  Worked MIR with it.

John KB2HSH
Logged
AA4PB
Member

Posts: 12980




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: November 30, 2011, 07:30:41 AM »

The difference between 5W and 7W is only 1.46dB (about 1/4 of an S-Unit). You'd likely never notice the difference on the receive end. Its not worth the extra battery consumption and the heat generation - which is why most mfgs just stick with 5W. Also, considering that overall the transmitter is probably about 50% efficient you have to supply an additional 4W of DC power to create the extra 2W of RF power.

Logged
N1CX
Member

Posts: 135




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: December 04, 2011, 05:48:48 AM »

Commercial stuff is limited to 6 watts I believe on certain bands and I think all others are 5 watts by FCC rule/certification.

Not sure if ham stuff is the same way..
Logged
KD5KFL
Member

Posts: 55




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: December 07, 2011, 12:22:15 PM »

compare the length of your brain stem, from base of skull to bottom of tailbone, to a half wavelength at 2 meters
Logged
W3LK
Member

Posts: 5639




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: December 08, 2011, 03:36:36 PM »

Commercial stuff is limited to 6 watts I believe on certain bands and I think all others are 5 watts by FCC rule/certification.

Not sure if ham stuff is the same way..

No. With the exception of 30m and 60m, 1,500w is legal on most all amateur frequencies. There are some restrictions on 70cm around certain military radar installations.

Information like this was apart of your written license exams. Smiley
Logged

A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
K7RBW
Member

Posts: 398




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: December 09, 2011, 06:37:07 AM »

I think he's talking about handhelds. Even Ham handhelds are rarely more than 7w, for all the practical reasons stated above (power supply size/weight, heat dissapation, proximity to the grey matter between your ears, etc.) more than any legal limitation.

I'd love to see a 1500w handi-talkie, but I wouldn't want to carry it. Smiley
Logged
W3LK
Member

Posts: 5639




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: December 09, 2011, 01:22:20 PM »

I think he's talking about handhelds. Even Ham handhelds are rarely more than 7w, for all the practical reasons stated above (power supply size/weight, heat dissapation, proximity to the grey matter between your ears, etc.) more than any legal limitation.

I'd love to see a 1500w handi-talkie, but I wouldn't want to carry it. Smiley

I read him correctly. While there MAY be some FCC power restrictions for commercial HTs (I don't think so, but I could be wrong) there is NO FCC power-restriction on amateur HTs - the limit is all practical.
Logged

A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
LB5KE
Member

Posts: 141




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: December 17, 2011, 01:23:58 PM »

I found this on ebay.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/YAESU-VX-7R-3-band-10-WATT-VERSION-Black-UNLOCKED-TRANSMIT-RECEIVE-/170749168470?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item27c1718b56

It's software upgraded. Why diden't they have that option for all of them in the first place i wonder.
Logged
KG4NEL
Member

Posts: 443




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: December 18, 2011, 03:30:24 PM »

I'd love to see a 1500w handi-talkie, but I wouldn't want to carry it. Smiley

I'd save me on gym membership, at least Smiley
Logged
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6055




Ignore
« Reply #24 on: December 27, 2011, 07:39:07 AM »

Microwaves (higher than the 440 mhz band) can cause tissue heating, and even the smallest microwave oven is rated at around five HUNDRED watts.  To have any effect on the human body, that body would have to be exposed to far more than 5--or even 10--watts of power from a handheld VHF radio.

Some people just worry too much.
Logged
WX7G
Member

Posts: 6198




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: December 27, 2011, 08:07:48 AM »

And there's more than 500 watts in a microwave oven. It is a relatively high-Q box with the stored energy being many times 500 watts.
Logged
ONAIR
Member

Posts: 1747




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: December 27, 2011, 10:21:57 AM »

I think he's talking about handhelds. Even Ham handhelds are rarely more than 7w, for all the practical reasons stated above (power supply size/weight, heat dissapation, proximity to the grey matter between your ears, etc.) more than any legal limitation.

I'd love to see a 1500w handi-talkie, but I wouldn't want to carry it. Smiley
  What about the batteries?  Smiley
Logged
ONAIR
Member

Posts: 1747




Ignore
« Reply #27 on: December 27, 2011, 10:24:17 AM »

And there's more than 500 watts in a microwave oven. It is a relatively high-Q box with the stored energy being many times 500 watts.
   So that's what they mean when they talk about a "Q multiplier"!  Smiley
Logged
NO2A
Member

Posts: 822




Ignore
« Reply #28 on: December 27, 2011, 11:40:18 AM »

If you ever want to feel what hot is try using a TH-F6 on 12v with the batteries removed. The back of it is bare metal. Ouch! And you want 10 watts?.... Cheesy
Logged
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6055




Ignore
« Reply #29 on: December 28, 2011, 11:37:39 AM »

And there's more than 500 watts in a microwave oven. It is a relatively high-Q box with the stored energy being many times 500 watts.

THANK YOU!  I was referring to certain cheap microwaves which are rated 500 watts, but, as you say, there is much more power than that stored there.  Even with microwave leakage, you don't hear anything of people getting hurt while standing near an operating microwave oven.  It's just more proof that 5 watts out of a VHF handheld radio isn't going to harm anyone. 
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 [2] 3 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!