Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Icom IC-R75 Rx is being discontinued  (Read 14074 times)
K0OD
Member

Posts: 2757




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: April 15, 2016, 08:54:20 AM »

" Very recent model, stand alone but SDR features as well"

But the costly receiver you're trying to sell is about 2% of what a modern SDR should be. It's highly portable with good battery life, but a $80-$160 Tecsun is too.     

I'm sure some affluent SWLs will buy the brand new ICOM IC-9300 transceiver just for its receiver which is truly a full featured "SDR in a Box" (and under 10 lbs). It boasts a 4.3" color TFT TOUCH SCREEN, 1 MHz bandscope, waterfall and audio scope. A tuner is built-in. Coverage is 30 KHz to 74 MHz. Specs rank the 9300 above most professional communications receivers of a few years ago. Incredibly, the 9300 is billed as an "Entry Level Radio." 




Will ICOM or one of the other majors bring out a receive-only "IC-9300" in a smaller, lighter package?
Logged
RENTON481
Member

Posts: 124




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: April 15, 2016, 03:07:57 PM »

One thing to bear in mind is that the economy isn't terrific right now. I looked at the indicators on both US government websites that cover such stats and things are a bit flat.

Hence, the market for receivers may be influenced by the possibility that a lot of people are a bit tighter with their money than they were before the Recession hit.

If the economy were better, perhaps the receiver market would be a bit more robust.

Then again, maybe technology and HF's slowish decline may be a bigger factor.
Logged
KC2QYM
Member

Posts: 524




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: April 19, 2016, 09:03:12 AM »

Like many of you I was an avid SWL prior to getting my ticket.  I have an old SX-110 that works like a champ but the issue is that English language stations beaming to North America have declined to the point that there just isn't anything worth listening to.  There used to be great excitement in SWLing during the cold war.  Those days are gone and I believe that SW radio has declined enough for me to place my Hallicrafters on the dead radio shelf for display in my personal museum.
Logged
K0OD
Member

Posts: 2757




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: April 20, 2016, 05:51:37 AM »

Is there any active ham these days who has used a panadaptor (bandscope) and would part with that feature?

One obvious benefit is to spot signals on bands with rare openings such as 10 or 6 meters. With the IC-7300, for example, you can see an entire 1 MHz of activity at a glance. On HF the bandscope is an essential tool for finding the subject of a pileup, or for locating callers when the DX station's frequency is known. During contests I tend to tune more with my eyes than my ears using my Flex-5000. And now with the IC-7300 these very useful features add almost nothing to cost.


"They seem to cater now for kids who know naff all about radio but they have a head full of / digital / computers / touch screens / mobile phone bells and whistles. "
Sorry you wasted $600 on the feature-less CR-1a and can't find anyone to buy it.
Logged
HAMSTUDY
Member

Posts: 144




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: April 23, 2016, 12:50:40 AM »

Is there any active ham these days who has used a panadaptor (bandscope) and would part with that feature?

Seems unlikely (maybe someone would give up a small built-in LCD panadapter but it's hard to imagine giving up an external panadapter on the type of displays normally used with computers).

Quote
One obvious benefit is to spot signals on bands with rare openings such as 10 or 6 meters. With the IC-7300, for example, you can see an entire 1 MHz of activity at a glance. On HF the bandscope is an essential tool for finding the subject of a pileup, or for locating callers when the DX station's frequency is known. During contests I tend to tune more with my eyes than my ears using my Flex-5000. And now with the IC-7300 these very useful features add almost nothing to cost.


On a SDRPlay with free HDSDR software you can see an entire 8 MHz Smiley of activity at a glance while tuning from 100 kHz to ~2 GHz.
Of course, unlike the IC-7300 and Flex-5000 you can only receive not transmit but for $150 it's still a pretty good deal.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2016, 12:53:29 AM by HAMSTUDY » Logged
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!