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Author Topic: What was your first shortwave radio?  (Read 123365 times)
N0PQK
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« Reply #150 on: September 17, 2014, 06:41:38 PM »

Hallicrafters SX-140 (Here is a picture listed below that I found on the internet.)

http://n4trb.com/DaytonHamvention2007/images/dayton_0105_hallicrafters_sx_140.jpg
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M5AEO
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« Reply #151 on: September 18, 2014, 02:27:58 PM »

My first shortwave set was a Russian Vega portable.  It had about 8 shortwave bands and a terrible pointer type frequency readout that was actually marked in Metres.  At that time Radio Moscow only read out their frequencies in metres anyway!  I heard my letter read on Moscow Mailbag when I was about 10 years old, what a thrill!   My first 'real' radio was the Yaesu FRG-7, which was great: I could get the frequency to within about 10Khz then!  I owned several receivers over the years, and always regretted selling the old 'Frog', but last Christmas my XYL managed to get me and old FRG-7!, so I'm back to where I started!

Jonathan, M5AEO, London.

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K7QQH
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« Reply #152 on: October 01, 2014, 04:48:12 PM »

My first one - at the tender age of 10 while living in Livingston, Montana was an old Zenith TransOceanic (I don't remember the model, but it was about a '46-'50 vintage). My dad bought it from a guy at a gas station for five bucks, and he was VERY supportive of my becoming an SWL (the year was 1956). Got my Novice ticket as KN7NID in Hermiston, Oregon in 1959 at age 13 (the required code speed to pass the exam was 5 WPM).

After getting the Novice ticket, I "moved up" to the venerable National NC-60. Wow! I now had a radio to copy CW, and with a homebrew transmitter (built on a cake pan chassis), I was chasing the airwaves on 80 and 40 meters with the few crystals I could scrounge up from my kid-ham pals! Life was good!

Oh, such pleasant memories...

73's to all, and CW forever,

Roger C.
K7QQH
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WB6NGC
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« Reply #153 on: October 02, 2014, 08:26:35 AM »

Echophone EC-1A
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N3AZH
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« Reply #154 on: October 04, 2014, 12:31:34 AM »

My first SW was a Lloyd's multiband portable a neighbor gave me in 1973. It was pretty crappy but it got the ball rolling. My favorite receiver was a National NC-183D I got in the 80's which was restored to like new condition. It had killer audio. Now (besides my ham rig) I have a Hallicrafters s-108 and a Hammarlund HQ-129x by no means Cadillac rigs, they glow like real radios do Wink Mostly these days I use them for MW and 75 meter AM. Also I have to mention I built one of those Radio Shack "science fair" regens back in the 70's. Used to have a killer SWL/Ute Qsl collection but that was sadly lost in a household disaster in 2005, along with many other treasures. Tongue
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WA4HBK
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« Reply #155 on: October 07, 2014, 04:29:10 PM »

Zenith Transoceanic.
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W8IFI
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« Reply #156 on: October 09, 2014, 10:22:27 PM »

My first radio in the early fifty's was a big council job that someone had  removed the cabinet. So I had a chassis, speaker and could play it. I remember cold winter nights when I would climb up the attic stairway (and it was cold!!) into the attic and take some wire I found and string the wires around the rafters to see what I could pick up. (mom used to store apples near the stairs and I can still smell them) . We had an oil forced air heating system. At Christmas I would place the radio near the air ducts in the basement and beautiful Christmas music would filter in every room in the house. There was great Christmas music from Germany, Slovakia, Switzerland, Britain, Hungary,
Holland, Italy,and Scandinavia. Last Christmas I couldn't fin a European station playing the music. Later I built a Knight Kit Space Spanner with and old soldering Iron. We were poor and couldn't afford the frivolity of a soldering gun.
Warm memories never the less.
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WB2TQC
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« Reply #157 on: October 13, 2014, 06:22:41 PM »

First time I listened to Shortwave was on an old console model radio that my dad picked up off the street. He wanted the console for something. I took the tubes to be tested and replaced two bad ones. I took the innards out and placed it in a small box. It didn't have a glass face so I really never knew what Frequency I was on but the first station that caught my attention was the Time Station from Ottawa Canada. CHU. I used to listen to it for a long time even though all it did was beep at me.  Smiley The Bartender in the Bar my Father frequented sold me my second Radio. An Old Lafayette HE-15. Went from there to an Old National and then a Hallicrafters S-108. Many years later I purchased and still have a Hallicrafters SX-110. I loved being an SWL. When Popular Electronics formed a SWL Club I applied for membership and received call letters WPE2LPQ. Still remember it like it was yesterday.
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WA8UEG
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« Reply #158 on: October 18, 2014, 02:34:24 PM »

Knight Kit Span Master, also 1st kit I built. It stills sits on the top shelf in my shack and I turn it on every couple of months. Ist Super Het was a Hallicrafters S119 Sky Buddy and it sits next to the Span Master and listened to every couple of months also.
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K2TGI
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« Reply #159 on: October 19, 2014, 10:22:21 AM »

Ours was a Knightkit Spanmaster my Dad and I built, we thought we were in heaven
listening to all the stations . . . .
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W9ALD
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« Reply #160 on: Yesterday at 07:56:14 AM »

As a kid growing up in Southern Minnesota whose father ran a Cities Service gas station and later when Cities Service was was bought out by Gulf Oil I had a front row seat to what then was a common marketing practice.  The reduced price item unrelated to fuel for your car.  Most of the time it was a piece of glassware of some sort.  I remember a wooden handled brown glass root beer mug with western theme items printed on the surface ... cowboy boots, branding irons and the like.

One summer the item was a three band radio!  AM & FM plus SW.  It had two speakers on the front for the stereo FM and the cool telescoping antenna.  While I helped out pumping gas as a very young boy, dad was not about to give one of those away.  You had to earn it and get a fill of gas.  I had been mowing my grandparents lawn all summere and at $.50 a week it didn't add up too fast, especially when you had an addiction to Mountain Dew at $.10 a bottle.  Well the big day finally arrived, I had the money all saved up, but alas, I had nothing that burned gasoline and certainly did not have anything I could drive in and fill up with.  But, Grandpa Clyde had an idea.  He lived about half a mile from the gas station and told me to be at his house at 9:00 a.m.  He filled the mower with gas and sent me on my way to dad's gas station and the waiting fuel pumps and MY Ross three band radio.  Clyde got in his '61 Ford Galaxie and beat me there and was waiting by the pop machine when I drove over the alarm bell hose  Dad promptly ran out only to find me on the riding mower.  "Fill it up please ... and I think I would like one of those three band radios you are offering with a fill of gasoline!  Clyde bought the soda pop for us all that day.

Like most of SWLers of that era we listened to Radio Moscow, HCJB Voice of the Andies, Radio Habana, The BBC World Service, The Voice of America Breakfast Show, Daybreak Africa and the list goes on and on.

Now, I am not the sharpest tack in the box.  I did not go through the rebellious teen years even though I was a teen once upon a time.  And I enjoyed the company of older folks (read W.W. I Vets) more than kids my own age.    I seem to have been always paying more attention to world events than the local news and gossip.  AND it only took me about a month to figure out how the SW radio I fell asleep listening to every night in my bed would wind up on my dresser turned off in the morning!

I am afraid that little ride on a lawnmower cost me more than the $.13 for gasoline and $6.95 for the radio.  Batteries were not cheap!
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