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Author Topic: So who else is lookig forward to the ARRL 10 meter contest this year?  (Read 12846 times)
AE4RV
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« Reply #15 on: December 09, 2011, 07:21:37 AM »

I've been doing them for fun for awhile now and I'm always search and pounce. I have yet to sit on a frequency and call CQ and run through a bunch of ops calling me. I don't know if I'd ever get the hang of that.

Oh, you definitely can but you're right it's a slightly different skillset than just pure S&P. Try the NAQCC sprint for practice, then the NAQP's, then the ARRL sweepstakes and other domestic contests. Usually there will be zero or one guys responding to your CQ, but occasionally you'll get 2 or 3 or 4 and have to sort through them and you will build up some skill getting the one you want to send his call in the clear.

Tim.

Exactly! The NAQCC monthly sprints is where I finally got the courage to hold frequencies. Such great practice (and fun!).
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ONAIR
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« Reply #16 on: December 09, 2011, 10:32:24 PM »

The contest has begun!  Even though the sun has set, local hams on the east coast are making nearby 10 Meter contacts.
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KD8NGE
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« Reply #17 on: December 10, 2011, 05:07:01 AM »

It's a poor carpenter who blames his tools, so let me state for the record
(ahem!)
(assumes stuffed shirt posture)
(raises finger for emphasis)
I seem to have a mechanical problem my QTH, so far 10 meters is absolutely silent.
I say it's a mechanical problem because there's a fair to middlin' chance it has to do with the loose nut holding the microphone!
I have 53 feet of wire at about a 40 degree angle, through a tuner ... maybe I should hang out a wet string instead ...?
(20, 40 and 80m work fine.  60 meters does too, as long as radar doesn't come muttering in again ...)
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K9NW
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Posts: 445




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« Reply #18 on: December 10, 2011, 05:26:28 AM »

Quote
so far 10 meters is absolutely silent.

Find about 17' of wire.  Cut it in half.  Find a chunk of coax.  Attach one piece of wire to the center conductor.  Attach the other piece of wire to the braid.  Hang somewhere relatively in the clear...the higher the better but don't worry so much about that right now. 

I predict the band will suddenly come to life.
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ONAIR
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Posts: 1741




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« Reply #19 on: December 10, 2011, 07:41:06 AM »

It's a poor carpenter who blames his tools, so let me state for the record
(ahem!)
(assumes stuffed shirt posture)
(raises finger for emphasis)
I seem to have a mechanical problem my QTH, so far 10 meters is absolutely silent.
I say it's a mechanical problem because there's a fair to middlin' chance it has to do with the loose nut holding the microphone!
I have 53 feet of wire at about a 40 degree angle, through a tuner ... maybe I should hang out a wet string instead ...?
(20, 40 and 80m work fine.  60 meters does too, as long as radar doesn't come muttering in again ...)
    It wasn't your fault, it was just the airwaves!  Try it now, the sun is up, and 10 is as crowded as 11 Meters was in the '70s!
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G7MRV
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« Reply #20 on: December 11, 2011, 09:53:41 AM »

Well, the band is now closed for me here in the UK, but despite only being able to 'dip in' now and then, and having a very modest set-up, ive come away with 72 QSOs, 9 new states, and a few new countries. My total operating time was probably no more than a couple of hours, and much of that was interupted! 100w to a doublet, or a j-pole.

One thing i did notice was the number of ops with echo-mics etc. Sorry, but if you were using one of these then you wont find me in your log! Not only do they sound apalling anyway, but those using them were all but unintelligible.

That said, most ops were very good, polite and patient, including one Russian who managed to rag-chew a contest exchange! Grin

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DJ1YFK
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« Reply #21 on: December 11, 2011, 01:41:29 PM »

One thing i did notice was the number of ops with echo-mics etc. Sorry, but if you were using one of these then you wont find me in your log! Not only do they sound apalling anyway, but those using them were all but unintelligible.

I don't think anyone used an echo-microphone this weekend, but the propagation was sometimes "too good", causing multiple echoes to be heard of some stations. This morning, it was quite difficult to work most of the European stations because their signals arrived over two or three paths at the same time. Turning the antenna into a "wrong" direction sometimes helped. Thanks to having antennas into three directions (2*5el to the US, 6el to Asia, 2el to South America) to switch immediately helped a lot.

My time was quite limited this weekend, but about 390 QSOs and only 34 DXCCs and 41 states/provinces went into my log in about four hours (3h run while the band was open to the US, 1h S&P after it closed).

73
Fabian DJ1YFK
« Last Edit: December 11, 2011, 01:44:03 PM by DJ1YFK » Logged

N7SMI
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Posts: 330




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« Reply #22 on: December 11, 2011, 04:49:38 PM »

This morning, it was quite difficult to work most of the European stations because their signals arrived over two or three paths at the same time. Turning the antenna into a "wrong" direction sometimes helped.

Us poor folks with verticals really had problems. It was cool how some stations would come in on top of themselves multiple times.

It must really suck to live in the Midwest US during a contest like this. I only heard a couple Midwest states. I imagine they were propagating right over the top of both coasts. The Mountain West to East coast corridor was amazing. I heard an Alabama call say he had worked 100 Arizona stations in a few hours. I only worked a couple hours and quickly worked every state east of the Mississippi - but only heard a couple states this side of it. I didn't hear a single West coast station - and I'll usually trade 10 K6's for any other station.
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KB3LIX
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Posts: 1107




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« Reply #23 on: December 11, 2011, 07:16:55 PM »

One thing i did notice was the number of ops with echo-mics etc. Sorry, but if you were using one of these then you wont find me in your log! Not only do they sound apalling anyway, but those using them were all but unintelligible.

I don't think anyone used an echo-microphone this weekend, but the propagation was sometimes "too good", causing multiple echoes to be heard of some stations. This morning, it was quite difficult to work most of the European stations because their signals arrived over two or three paths at the same time. Turning the antenna into a "wrong" direction sometimes helped. Thanks to having antennas into three directions (2*5el to the US, 6el to Asia, 2el to South America) to switch immediately helped a lot.

My time was quite limited this weekend, but about 390 QSOs and only 34 DXCCs and 41 states/provinces went into my log in about four hours (3h run while the band was open to the US, 1h S&P after it closed).

73
Fabian DJ1YFK

Hi Fabian,
I was your number 319 on CW.
I thought that call was familiar.
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KQ0C
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Posts: 25




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« Reply #24 on: December 11, 2011, 09:20:20 PM »

For running a frequency it is really not that hard... you type about half of the other station's data while they are talking and the other half while you are responding to them. It only takes a few until you get the hang of it. But in most contests probably 80% of the people only S&P and just a few CQ. So you can pick the style that you prefer. Funny, in this weekend's 10 meter contest I got more rare DX while calling CQ than I did while chasing multipliers S&P.

On the low bakds you need a pretty big signal to carve out a frequency to CQ. But on 10 meters you can always just go a bit higher. I think the band goes forever, but there is some rumor that it quits at 30 MHz.
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AH6RR
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Posts: 803




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« Reply #25 on: December 11, 2011, 09:33:58 PM »

Yes lots of multi-path signals today and yesterday but what a blast!! I was working North, Central and South America, South Africa, South Pacific and Aisa at the same time. Worked all 50 states but never heard a peep out of Europe :-(. Still all in all a great contest with fantastic propagation thanks to El Sol.

73 and Merry Christmas

Roland AH6RR
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WS4T
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Posts: 182




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« Reply #26 on: December 12, 2011, 02:14:27 AM »

Re. "echo-mics": A month or so ago when I first started noticing echoes, I thought my own receiver was broken. I was relieved to finally figure out it wasn't me. All of the big Siberian stations seem to have echoes here, especially around midday. Multipath propagation? Or are we possibly hearing short path AND long path at the same time?

I managed to work 17 US states from here. Conditions seemed worse than in CQ WW CW, and I didn't hear many stations beyond the east coast. But the day is terribly short here now: Only 6 h 11 min of sun today.

Biggest thrill was ZP5X on long path. I couldn't break the short-path pile-up the first day, but on Sunday I heard him via long path with no pile-up and he got me after a couple calls. Long live 10 meters!

73,
Gary, ES1WST
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N2SLO
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Posts: 65




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« Reply #27 on: December 12, 2011, 07:44:51 AM »

"Us poor folks with verticals really had problems. It was cool how some stations would come in on top of themselves multiple times." Yes, probably true for midwest locations. Location is everything. I was able to log my highest number of contacts ever for any contest, whether VHF or HF. My modest station is an IMAX 2000 at 35 FT, and only 50 watts on 10M. 210 contacts, (all on phone) and I set a goal to make at least make 200 contacts for this contest. I probably didn't win, but the challenge of low power, and endurance needed for the two days is well worth the chance to participate and learn some contest skills. For those of you who I made a contact, thanks for a great contest. 73   David



« Last Edit: December 12, 2011, 08:09:29 AM by N2SLO » Logged
G7MRV
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« Reply #28 on: December 12, 2011, 07:53:56 AM »

I agree there was some multipath (something im well used to in my professional career - UHF broadcasting), but the stations im refering to were coming by the same paths as others in the same region, even the same city, that where perfectly clear. Unless thats some special propagation unique to 10m, since ive never encountered that above and below on the various commercial/government links ive worked on around 25 and 30MHz.

Anyway, thoroughly enjoyable, just wish i had more time and better antennas!
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NN4F
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Posts: 51




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« Reply #29 on: December 12, 2011, 11:18:29 AM »

What amazed me were how many ops gave non 59 reports, out of 1092 contacts, I have 47 contacts with reports ranging from 53 to 58.... most stations i worked were 20 over 9 but we gave the "standard contest" 59.

Propagation was pretty amazing, but soon as the sun set in EU, they just vanished...as if by magic..

Agree with the echo's some crazy multi-path and back-scatter, definetly not echo-mics. I was amazed to work close in states, just missed a few, and I was also blown away by the number of AZ/CO stations.. wow
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