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Author Topic: Multiple Hustler resonators on mast - so how does that work?  (Read 5309 times)
HS0ZIB
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« on: November 27, 2011, 07:01:33 AM »

I've read that it's possible to install more than one Hustler resonator on a single mast - to enable operation on 2 bands without using a screwdriver antenna.

I recently purchased several secondhand Hustler resonators and stingers, and this included a metal mount for up to 3 resonators.

So how does this work?  Right now, I have a 20 meter band resonator installed on my 24 inch mast, and the stinger has been adjusted for resonance at 14.250 MHz (midband SSB).  If I added a 10 meter band resonator, surely I would need to tweak the stinger every time that I want to operate on 10 meters?

Just trying to get my head round all this.  20 meter mobile is fun, but I hear that 10 meters is GREAT fun right now

Simon
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AC4RD
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« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2011, 09:01:21 AM »

I have a 20 meter band resonator installed on my 24 inch mast, and the stinger has been adjusted for resonance at 14.250 MHz (midband SSB).  If I added a 10 meter band resonator, surely I would need to tweak the stinger every time that I want to operate on 10 meters?

Simon, I played with multiple resonators on my mast for a bit.  Getting them tuned turned out to be more bother than it was worth, in my opinion.   But the idea is that you get your 20m resonator and a 15m and a 10m (or whatever bands you want), all three resonators on that little bent adaptor piece.  And once you get all three tuned and re-tuned until all three are resonant where you want them, then you can operate any of the three bands without ANY fuss--energy flows through the resonant resonator, not the others.   It's a good idea and a lot of people have made it work, so the fact that I gave up on it is NOT a reason not to try it yourself.

What I do is just to keep one standard mast on my car, and have resonators tuned for each band I want to work.  To change bands, I change resonators.  A lot of people think this is not good, but it works nicely for me.   Description at    http://www.duke.edu/~kuzen001/ac4rdmobile.htm  if you want to see it.

K0BG points out that Hustler resonators aren't terribly sturdy, and can be expected to start falling apart at some point.  I'm sure he's right, but I've got a bundle of them, and I'm always changing things anyway, so I'm satisfied with my current arrangement.  (And I'll probably have some other arrangement by next spring.)   :-)  73!
« Last Edit: November 27, 2011, 02:11:07 PM by AC4RD » Logged
N6AJR
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« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2011, 11:52:18 AM »

How they work is a lot like a fan dipole.  RF is lazy so if you send it up the pipe on say 15 meters and there is a 10 a 15 and a 20 m tip on the mast, it will choose the 15 m tip as it has an  impeadance of around 50 ohms, and the other two could be several hundred or even thousands of ohm of impeadance because the  are cut for a different band.  So most of the power will go up the 15 m  tip.

As an antenna, they work "ok", but physically they are a bit of a hassle.  That is a lot of wind resistance and will probably need a fishing line to keep it from blowing over.

I used on on the pickup for a while, and also tried  ham sticks and ended up with a DK-3  screwdriver.  I hope this helps.
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K0BG
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« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2011, 12:54:05 PM »

I agree that they're a mess to tune, but that is not the biggest problem—that's the mast itself.

The fold over one isn't worth the effort, and it is not uncommon to see one with a jumper across the mast coupling. The 3/8x24 threaded ferrules are a press fit. They have a hard time supporting a single coil over time, much less three of them. If that wasn't enough, the large coils are actually losses than the little ones because of their large end caps.

As Tom alluded to, you're much better off with a decent screwdriver.
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AC4RD
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« Reply #4 on: November 27, 2011, 02:16:58 PM »

I agree that they're a mess to tune, but that is not the biggest problem—that's the mast itself.
The fold over one isn't worth the effort...
As Tom alluded to, you're much better off with a decent screwdriver.

I'm using the DX Engineering masts, and they're working just fine.  I've found it's worth the time to take the mast and mount apart every couple of months and hit 'em with a wire brush, to clean out any corrosion.  

The single mast and resonator works fine for me.   The Hustler system is inexpensive, flexible, and simple, and it gives me decent performance on 20, 17, 15, 12, and 10; those are the only bands I use mobile.   It's certainly not for everybody, but it suits me just fine. 
« Last Edit: November 28, 2011, 04:07:41 AM by AC4RD » Logged
K5TVC
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« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2011, 06:35:46 AM »

I have used Hustler resonators since the 60's.  I use a 40 and 20 meter resonator on the short Hustler mast using a home made mount to mount the two together.  Never had a problem tuning them and have worked all counties with this set-up.  I also use a 200 pf disc cap at the base of the mount as an L network. Wife approved (almost)........
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KQ6Q
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« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2011, 01:36:41 PM »

You can even use two of the adapter plates one one mast, mount one corner of each to the mast, and mount four resonators on the outer four corners. Not great for mobile, but I use it with a triple magmount on a metal mobilehome roof. Ok for 20 through 10 (pick 4).
I tried the triple mount with 80, 40, and 30, and there was too much wind drag (this is on a roof, not mobile!) and it would blow over. So below 20m, each resonator needs its own mast. N4AJR's comment holds for paralleling the antennas at the feedline also. I've got a 40m single resontor on a mast, on a coax tee so one feedline has the 20-10 cluster and also othe 40m single, and it works nicely.  Again, this works on a roof, not necessarily on a vehicle!
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W4FID
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« Reply #7 on: December 11, 2011, 01:48:14 PM »

Hustler has made a LOT of antennas for MANY years ............. so obviously they are doing stuff right. However the comments already here are valid. With 3 resonators on that triangular angle plate and one straight up you have a LOT of wind resistance and momentum as the vehicles starts, stops, and gets hit with turbulence passing a truck. All of which lead to mechanical failure. A "guy" is usually used but it has issues too like attaching it and if it is too tight or too loose and not effective. And the coils in the resonators are more "dense" than the ones in say a ham stick so they are less efficient. All in all a lot of stuff to contend with at a fairly high cost.

The idea of a single band on a quick disconnect is a good one. Much easier to use and that solves most of the multi-band issues ................... at a trade off on needing to make a physical change while stopped to change bands Vs the band switch on your rig while moving. But if that's your strategy why not use ham-sticks (generic -- several makers) at a lot lower cost and the same radiation efficiency? I have used a set of them for years. Have 40 - 20 - 15 - 10 for SSB mobile and 40 - 30 CW for when we're parked and I'm in the travel trailer. The 6 of them are about half or a third the cost of a comparable Hustler set up.

Which ever you do plan on spending a while with an analyzer and doing some pruning/tuning to get them resonant in a frequency in the middle of where you will usually operate. Expect fairly narrow bandwidth since they are shortened/loaded antennas. A tuner will keep the rig happy -- but resonant is efficient and non resonant is non efficient and with any compromise antenna you need all the efficiency you can get.
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AA4PB
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« Reply #8 on: December 11, 2011, 02:04:22 PM »

RF follows Ohm's law like any other electric current. If you put a 50 Ohm resistor in parallel with a 1000 Ohm resistor the majority of the current flows in the 50 Ohm resistor. It takes the path of least resistance - maybe that's being lazy or maybe its just being smart  Grin Anyway, Mr. Ohm found out about it a long time ago.

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Bob  AA4PB
Garrisonville, VA
WB6BYU
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« Reply #9 on: December 12, 2011, 03:37:03 PM »

Quote from: HS0ZIB
So how does this work?  Right now, I have a 20 meter band resonator installed on my 24 inch mast, and the stinger has been adjusted for resonance at 14.250 MHz (midband SSB).  If I added a 10 meter band resonator, surely I would need to tweak the stinger every time that I want to operate on 10 meters?


You mount two or three resonators on the bracket (or more with larger brackets - I've seen up to 5
at a time) and adjust each for resonance in the desired part of the band with the second resonator
in place.  Once you do that, you don't have to make any adjustments when changing bands.
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